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All (9)

All (9) (9 of 9 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114678
    Description:

    This study provides information on the number of Canadians who reported that they ever had to temporarily live with family, friends, in their car, or anywhere else because they had nowhere else to live—a situation referred to as ‘hidden’ or ‘concealed’ homelessness. It also examines the characteristics of those who had experienced hidden homelessness at some point in their life.

    Release date: 2016-11-15

  • Technical products: 12-002-X201500114147
    Description:

    Influential observations in logistic regression are those that have a notable effect on certain aspects of the model fit. Large sample size alone does not eliminate this concern; it is still important to examine potentially influential observations, especially in complex survey data. This paper describes a straightforward algorithm for examining potentially influential observations in complex survey data using SAS software. This algorithm was applied in a study using the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey that examined factors associated with family physician utilization for adolescents.

    Release date: 2015-03-25

  • Technical products: 12-002-X201400111901
    Description:

    This document is for analysts/researchers who are considering doing research with data from a survey where both survey weights and bootstrap weights are provided in the data files. This document gives directions, for some selected software packages, about how to get started in using survey weights and bootstrap weights for an analysis of survey data. We give brief directions for obtaining survey-weighted estimates, bootstrap variance estimates (and other desired error quantities) and some typical test statistics for each software package in turn. While these directions are provided just for the chosen examples, there will be information about the range of weighted and bootstrapped analyses that can be carried out by each software package.

    Release date: 2014-08-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111475
    Description:

    The Female Population chapter of Women in Canada presents the socio-demographic and ethno-cultural characteristics of women and girls living in this country. Understanding the current trends related to an aging, and an increasingly diverse female population, can help inform policy and planning. Topics examined in this chapter include the distribution of the female population across the provinces and territories and across age, and the share with an Aboriginal identity. In addition, aspects of diversity within the female population, including immigrant status and visible minority status, will be presented as well as residential mobility, language-related characteristics, and religious affiliation and religiosity. Where appropriate, trends over time will be analyzed and comparisons will be drawn with the male population in order to highlight existing similarities and differences.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060069229
    Description:

    The post-war surge of women into the labour force has slowed in recent years, mostly in western Canada. Participation rates east of the Ottawa River continue to increase, reflecting differences between east and west in day care, education, job composition, immigration and the age of women.

    Release date: 2006-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036006
    Description:

    This article looks at whether there are regional differences in giving and volunteering.

    Release date: 2001-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000035715
    Description:

    This study explores why female university students, who outnumber male students, remain underrepresented in several professions, including engineering.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013569
    Description:

    The intergenerational fairness and long-term sustainability of Canada's social programs, such as pensions and health care, have recently re-emerged as an issue. The last time this issue had any prominence was more than a decade ago, as part of Canada's "great pension debate" of the late 1970s and early 1980s. As before, the issue is being driven by concerns over population aging.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013569
    Description:

    The intergenerational fairness and long-term sustainability of Canada's social programs, such as pensions and health care, have recently re-emerged as an issue. The last time this issue had any prominence was more than a decade ago, as part of Canada's "great pension debate" of the late 1970s and early 1980s. As before, the issue is being driven by concerns over population aging.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

Analysis (6)

Analysis (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114678
    Description:

    This study provides information on the number of Canadians who reported that they ever had to temporarily live with family, friends, in their car, or anywhere else because they had nowhere else to live—a situation referred to as ‘hidden’ or ‘concealed’ homelessness. It also examines the characteristics of those who had experienced hidden homelessness at some point in their life.

    Release date: 2016-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111475
    Description:

    The Female Population chapter of Women in Canada presents the socio-demographic and ethno-cultural characteristics of women and girls living in this country. Understanding the current trends related to an aging, and an increasingly diverse female population, can help inform policy and planning. Topics examined in this chapter include the distribution of the female population across the provinces and territories and across age, and the share with an Aboriginal identity. In addition, aspects of diversity within the female population, including immigrant status and visible minority status, will be presented as well as residential mobility, language-related characteristics, and religious affiliation and religiosity. Where appropriate, trends over time will be analyzed and comparisons will be drawn with the male population in order to highlight existing similarities and differences.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060069229
    Description:

    The post-war surge of women into the labour force has slowed in recent years, mostly in western Canada. Participation rates east of the Ottawa River continue to increase, reflecting differences between east and west in day care, education, job composition, immigration and the age of women.

    Release date: 2006-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036006
    Description:

    This article looks at whether there are regional differences in giving and volunteering.

    Release date: 2001-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000035715
    Description:

    This study explores why female university students, who outnumber male students, remain underrepresented in several professions, including engineering.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Technical products: 12-002-X201500114147
    Description:

    Influential observations in logistic regression are those that have a notable effect on certain aspects of the model fit. Large sample size alone does not eliminate this concern; it is still important to examine potentially influential observations, especially in complex survey data. This paper describes a straightforward algorithm for examining potentially influential observations in complex survey data using SAS software. This algorithm was applied in a study using the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey that examined factors associated with family physician utilization for adolescents.

    Release date: 2015-03-25

  • Technical products: 12-002-X201400111901
    Description:

    This document is for analysts/researchers who are considering doing research with data from a survey where both survey weights and bootstrap weights are provided in the data files. This document gives directions, for some selected software packages, about how to get started in using survey weights and bootstrap weights for an analysis of survey data. We give brief directions for obtaining survey-weighted estimates, bootstrap variance estimates (and other desired error quantities) and some typical test statistics for each software package in turn. While these directions are provided just for the chosen examples, there will be information about the range of weighted and bootstrapped analyses that can be carried out by each software package.

    Release date: 2014-08-07

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