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All (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-544-X
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 1992 General Social Survey of Time Use. It examines the daily behaviour patterns and inherent time stress of key population groups among Canadians aged 15 and over. Men and women have been grouped into four broad age categories: youths, 15 to 24; baby boomers, 25-44; mid-agers, 45-64; and seniors, 65 and over. Key population cohorts were subsequently created by combining the significant dimensions that make up the various roles that individuals play over the life cycle (e.g., main activity, sex, marital status, child status and for seniors, living arrangements).

    Inter-group differences are explored in the average time spent on both paid and unpaid work activities, personal care and the time left for leisure activities. A number of issues are investigated such as equality of work and leisure within the family, the impact of the influx of women into the labour force, the responsibility for care giving of children and elderly parents, and more general concerns related to the aging of the population. As well, inter-group differences in the tensions arising from the effort to balance work and educational responsibilities with personal needs and family obligations are examined. The concluding chapter provides a snapshot of Canadian men and women at work and at play at various stages over the life cycle.

    Release date: 1995-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031637
    Description:

    In the midst of extensive restructuring and downsizing, women have continued to enter male-dominated occupations, albeit more slowly than before. This study explores women's occupational crossovers from 1986 to 1991 and compares them with earlier developments between 1971 and 1986.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995079
    Description:

    The key hypothesis of this paper is that time use data bases make possible a broader view of the benefits and costs of human capital than is otherwise possible. This achievement is enabled by a set of integrated information on not only educational attainment but also on time devoted to formal and informal study, to paid and unpaid work of economic value, to work of civic value, to leisure activities, and to the educating of children by parents. It is argued that such information is central to human capital theory, though much of it, especially on the leisure costs of investment in human capital, has been hitherto ignored. This new information is important because it can be used to inform the debate over the key issues in this field -- for example, the value of increased public support to formal education -- by measuring previously overlooked aspects of the benefits and costs of investment in human capital.

    Release date: 1995-07-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89F0029X
    Description:

    The Bibliographic employment equity database is an annotated bibliography of available research and studies containing employment equity data related to the four designated groups covered by the Employment Equity Act: Aboriginal Peoples, Persons with Disabilities, Visible Minorities and Women. The research and studies included were published in 1982 or later, refer to Canadian data and include statistical data or analysis of data.

    Release date: 1995-02-28

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  • Journals and periodicals: 89-544-X
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 1992 General Social Survey of Time Use. It examines the daily behaviour patterns and inherent time stress of key population groups among Canadians aged 15 and over. Men and women have been grouped into four broad age categories: youths, 15 to 24; baby boomers, 25-44; mid-agers, 45-64; and seniors, 65 and over. Key population cohorts were subsequently created by combining the significant dimensions that make up the various roles that individuals play over the life cycle (e.g., main activity, sex, marital status, child status and for seniors, living arrangements).

    Inter-group differences are explored in the average time spent on both paid and unpaid work activities, personal care and the time left for leisure activities. A number of issues are investigated such as equality of work and leisure within the family, the impact of the influx of women into the labour force, the responsibility for care giving of children and elderly parents, and more general concerns related to the aging of the population. As well, inter-group differences in the tensions arising from the effort to balance work and educational responsibilities with personal needs and family obligations are examined. The concluding chapter provides a snapshot of Canadian men and women at work and at play at various stages over the life cycle.

    Release date: 1995-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031637
    Description:

    In the midst of extensive restructuring and downsizing, women have continued to enter male-dominated occupations, albeit more slowly than before. This study explores women's occupational crossovers from 1986 to 1991 and compares them with earlier developments between 1971 and 1986.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995079
    Description:

    The key hypothesis of this paper is that time use data bases make possible a broader view of the benefits and costs of human capital than is otherwise possible. This achievement is enabled by a set of integrated information on not only educational attainment but also on time devoted to formal and informal study, to paid and unpaid work of economic value, to work of civic value, to leisure activities, and to the educating of children by parents. It is argued that such information is central to human capital theory, though much of it, especially on the leisure costs of investment in human capital, has been hitherto ignored. This new information is important because it can be used to inform the debate over the key issues in this field -- for example, the value of increased public support to formal education -- by measuring previously overlooked aspects of the benefits and costs of investment in human capital.

    Release date: 1995-07-30

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89F0029X
    Description:

    The Bibliographic employment equity database is an annotated bibliography of available research and studies containing employment equity data related to the four designated groups covered by the Employment Equity Act: Aboriginal Peoples, Persons with Disabilities, Visible Minorities and Women. The research and studies included were published in 1982 or later, refer to Canadian data and include statistical data or analysis of data.

    Release date: 1995-02-28

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