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All (18)

All (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044043
    Description:

    This profile of unionized women covers demographic and labour characteristics, wages, benefits and work arrangements. Also included are selected union statistics for both men and women. (This is an updated version of an article released shortly before Labour Day, 1998).

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980024078
    Description:

    Educational attainment is an important determinant of one's job opportunities and relative well-being. One influence on the level of education children attain is the level of education attained by parents.

    Release date: 1998-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980024077
    Description:

    In this article we describe changes in the pay and rank of women in Canadian universities over a period when universities evolved from small institutions serving a priveledged minority to much larger and more diverse institutions.

    Release date: 1998-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014027
    Description:

    I examine three questions in this paper : 1. Does existing knowledge about intergenerational transfers, both public and private, provide the basis for effective policy choices? What is missing? What is needed, in particular by Canada's statistical system? 2. With an aging society, rapidly shifting labour markets, and shrinking social transfers in Canada, is a new generational compact emerging? and 3. What are the roles of differing models of inter-generational transfers, indeed of the demo-graphic concept of generation itself, in defining the field of policy options for Canadians in the late 1990s? In addressing these questions, I rely on analyses and a framework developed in McDaniel (1997).

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014028
    Description:

    To gain a perspective on the issues that have and have not been covered by the authors I propose to note the key elements in the legacy that younger generations should hope to receive from their predecessors. In view of the comments that I will make later about the elderly I should make it clear that central aspects of the prevailing life cycle are taken as given : children live with a parent or parents and acquire education and skills until late adolescence or young adulthood when they enter the labour market and form their own household more or less at the same time.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998001
    Description:

    Rural and small town Canada continues to grow. Rural and small town growth rates vary widely among the provinces. Much of the growth within rural and small town areas is in the small towns. Sub-provincial data show wide regional differences within each province. The population in larger urban centres is growing faster. Thus, the share of Canada's population living in rural and small town areas has declined to 22 percent in 1996. Newfoundland is the only province with over 50 percent of its population living in rural and small town areas.

    Release date: 1998-10-14

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998013
    Description:

    This paper outlines the existing poverty and income measures and summarizes the recent developments of new measures.

    Release date: 1998-09-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980023922
    Description:

    This article examines the relationship between attendance at religious services and overall well-being, health and marital behaviour, and the attitudes of Canadians toward children, marriage and family relationships.

    Release date: 1998-09-15

  • Public use microdata: 12M0011X
    Description:

    Cycle 11 collected data from persons 15 years and older and concentrated on help given or received during temporary difficult times or out of necessity due to long-term health or physical limitations in daily activities either inside or outside the household. The target population of the General Social Survey consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1998-08-28

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19970004871
    Description:

    During the century now coming to a close, the structure of Canada's population has changed, chiefly as a result of the slow decline in fertility, which has narrowed the base of the age pyramid and broadened its peak. This steady evolution was interrupted for about 20 years by a still-unexplained phenomenon - the baby boom. Between 1946 and 1965, fertility and natality hit levels considered irretrievably lost, resulting in the famous explosion of births.

    Release date: 1998-06-24

  • Table: 85-224-X19980005290
    Description:

    Homicide is the most tragic form of family violence. Between 1977 and 1996, there were 12,666 victims of homicide in Canada. One-third involved victims and offenders who were related to each other by marriage, common-law union or kinship, another 49% involved acquaintances and 17% involved strangers.

    Release date: 1998-05-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 21F0016X
    Description:

    Based on a presentation by Dr. Ivan Fellegi to the Federal Deputy Ministers' Committee on the Economic Renewal of Rural Canada in September l996, Understanding rural Canada uses charts and maps to present information on: rural demography showing population change and net migration by census division for the most recent 5-year period (l989 to l994); a focus on rural youth including information on education attained, plans for further education and ablility to use computers; rural employment, rural unemployment, rural employment in growing sectors and rural employment by small businesses; a classification of census divisions by level of average incomes and change in average incomes to show that many rural areas have lower incomes and their incomes are falling further behind; and, a typology of census divisions where rural areas are classified to rural nirvana areas, agro-rural areas, rural enclave areas, rural resourced areas and native north areas. This presentation was an outgrowth of the publication Rural Canada: a profile published by the federal Interdepartmental Committee on Rural and Remote Canada in March, l995.

    Release date: 1998-04-01

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013571
    Description:

    "Intergenerational equity" is a term that can be interpreted in the sense of either: [1] equity between persons in the intergenerational transmission of economic status - often judged by the norm of "equality of opportunity"; or [2] equity in the intergenerational division of aggregate resources, considering all members of each generation as a group. Many of the papers in the companion volume (Corak, 1998) of intergenerational social mobility has long been a central issue in sociology and politics. This volume has focussed on the second interpretation, and espoused a "new" type of measurement of "Generational Accounting."

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013562
    Description:

    Statistics Canada regularly produces data dealing with government finances, the deficit, and national accounting. Indeed, in a sense, these data have been one of the historical mainstays of all statistical organizations.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013569
    Description:

    The intergenerational fairness and long-term sustainability of Canada's social programs, such as pensions and health care, have recently re-emerged as an issue. The last time this issue had any prominence was more than a decade ago, as part of Canada's "great pension debate" of the late 1970s and early 1980s. As before, the issue is being driven by concerns over population aging.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013570
    Description:

    In the following remarks I argue that Generational Accounting is a central tool for conducting fiscal policy in the long-term, and that in order to break the fixation of politicians with annual budgetary measures independent government agencies should be directly responsible for calculating the Generational Accounts.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013568
    Description:

    Many governments have adopted policies aimed at reducing public debt. Although the long-run fiscal dividends of such policies largely depend on the size of the debt-to-GDP cut, the short and medium run effects are more dependent on the type and speed of measures taken.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1997109
    Description:

    In addition to confirming a wage gap between Canadian workers as a whole and those of Aboriginal origin, our research also generated new findings: there is greater disparity in the distribution of wages among Aboriginals than among Canadian workers as a whole, even after allowing for demographic differences.

    Our analysis does not stop there. Indeed, this analysis can hide considerable wage dispersions between Aboriginal groups since appreciable wage gaps were noted between these groups. Having said this, wage dispersion is most likely greater for certain Aboriginal groups than others. Since this aspect has never been studied before, the purpose of this paper is to document differences in wage dispersion for the four main Aboriginal groups. Our results show that North American Indians living on reserves are the most disadvantaged Aboriginal group because their earnings are substantially lower than those of the other groups.

    Release date: 1998-01-14

Data (7)

Data (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Public use microdata: 12M0011X
    Description:

    Cycle 11 collected data from persons 15 years and older and concentrated on help given or received during temporary difficult times or out of necessity due to long-term health or physical limitations in daily activities either inside or outside the household. The target population of the General Social Survey consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1998-08-28

  • Table: 85-224-X19980005290
    Description:

    Homicide is the most tragic form of family violence. Between 1977 and 1996, there were 12,666 victims of homicide in Canada. One-third involved victims and offenders who were related to each other by marriage, common-law union or kinship, another 49% involved acquaintances and 17% involved strangers.

    Release date: 1998-05-28

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013571
    Description:

    "Intergenerational equity" is a term that can be interpreted in the sense of either: [1] equity between persons in the intergenerational transmission of economic status - often judged by the norm of "equality of opportunity"; or [2] equity in the intergenerational division of aggregate resources, considering all members of each generation as a group. Many of the papers in the companion volume (Corak, 1998) of intergenerational social mobility has long been a central issue in sociology and politics. This volume has focussed on the second interpretation, and espoused a "new" type of measurement of "Generational Accounting."

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013562
    Description:

    Statistics Canada regularly produces data dealing with government finances, the deficit, and national accounting. Indeed, in a sense, these data have been one of the historical mainstays of all statistical organizations.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013569
    Description:

    The intergenerational fairness and long-term sustainability of Canada's social programs, such as pensions and health care, have recently re-emerged as an issue. The last time this issue had any prominence was more than a decade ago, as part of Canada's "great pension debate" of the late 1970s and early 1980s. As before, the issue is being driven by concerns over population aging.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013570
    Description:

    In the following remarks I argue that Generational Accounting is a central tool for conducting fiscal policy in the long-term, and that in order to break the fixation of politicians with annual budgetary measures independent government agencies should be directly responsible for calculating the Generational Accounts.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013568
    Description:

    Many governments have adopted policies aimed at reducing public debt. Although the long-run fiscal dividends of such policies largely depend on the size of the debt-to-GDP cut, the short and medium run effects are more dependent on the type and speed of measures taken.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044043
    Description:

    This profile of unionized women covers demographic and labour characteristics, wages, benefits and work arrangements. Also included are selected union statistics for both men and women. (This is an updated version of an article released shortly before Labour Day, 1998).

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980024078
    Description:

    Educational attainment is an important determinant of one's job opportunities and relative well-being. One influence on the level of education children attain is the level of education attained by parents.

    Release date: 1998-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980024077
    Description:

    In this article we describe changes in the pay and rank of women in Canadian universities over a period when universities evolved from small institutions serving a priveledged minority to much larger and more diverse institutions.

    Release date: 1998-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014027
    Description:

    I examine three questions in this paper : 1. Does existing knowledge about intergenerational transfers, both public and private, provide the basis for effective policy choices? What is missing? What is needed, in particular by Canada's statistical system? 2. With an aging society, rapidly shifting labour markets, and shrinking social transfers in Canada, is a new generational compact emerging? and 3. What are the roles of differing models of inter-generational transfers, indeed of the demo-graphic concept of generation itself, in defining the field of policy options for Canadians in the late 1990s? In addressing these questions, I rely on analyses and a framework developed in McDaniel (1997).

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014028
    Description:

    To gain a perspective on the issues that have and have not been covered by the authors I propose to note the key elements in the legacy that younger generations should hope to receive from their predecessors. In view of the comments that I will make later about the elderly I should make it clear that central aspects of the prevailing life cycle are taken as given : children live with a parent or parents and acquire education and skills until late adolescence or young adulthood when they enter the labour market and form their own household more or less at the same time.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998001
    Description:

    Rural and small town Canada continues to grow. Rural and small town growth rates vary widely among the provinces. Much of the growth within rural and small town areas is in the small towns. Sub-provincial data show wide regional differences within each province. The population in larger urban centres is growing faster. Thus, the share of Canada's population living in rural and small town areas has declined to 22 percent in 1996. Newfoundland is the only province with over 50 percent of its population living in rural and small town areas.

    Release date: 1998-10-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980023922
    Description:

    This article examines the relationship between attendance at religious services and overall well-being, health and marital behaviour, and the attitudes of Canadians toward children, marriage and family relationships.

    Release date: 1998-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19970004871
    Description:

    During the century now coming to a close, the structure of Canada's population has changed, chiefly as a result of the slow decline in fertility, which has narrowed the base of the age pyramid and broadened its peak. This steady evolution was interrupted for about 20 years by a still-unexplained phenomenon - the baby boom. Between 1946 and 1965, fertility and natality hit levels considered irretrievably lost, resulting in the famous explosion of births.

    Release date: 1998-06-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 21F0016X
    Description:

    Based on a presentation by Dr. Ivan Fellegi to the Federal Deputy Ministers' Committee on the Economic Renewal of Rural Canada in September l996, Understanding rural Canada uses charts and maps to present information on: rural demography showing population change and net migration by census division for the most recent 5-year period (l989 to l994); a focus on rural youth including information on education attained, plans for further education and ablility to use computers; rural employment, rural unemployment, rural employment in growing sectors and rural employment by small businesses; a classification of census divisions by level of average incomes and change in average incomes to show that many rural areas have lower incomes and their incomes are falling further behind; and, a typology of census divisions where rural areas are classified to rural nirvana areas, agro-rural areas, rural enclave areas, rural resourced areas and native north areas. This presentation was an outgrowth of the publication Rural Canada: a profile published by the federal Interdepartmental Committee on Rural and Remote Canada in March, l995.

    Release date: 1998-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1997109
    Description:

    In addition to confirming a wage gap between Canadian workers as a whole and those of Aboriginal origin, our research also generated new findings: there is greater disparity in the distribution of wages among Aboriginals than among Canadian workers as a whole, even after allowing for demographic differences.

    Our analysis does not stop there. Indeed, this analysis can hide considerable wage dispersions between Aboriginal groups since appreciable wage gaps were noted between these groups. Having said this, wage dispersion is most likely greater for certain Aboriginal groups than others. Since this aspect has never been studied before, the purpose of this paper is to document differences in wage dispersion for the four main Aboriginal groups. Our results show that North American Indians living on reserves are the most disadvantaged Aboriginal group because their earnings are substantially lower than those of the other groups.

    Release date: 1998-01-14

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

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