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All (33) (25 of 33 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20020009227
    Description:

    The first assesses how the fertility of immigrant women evolved between 1976-1981 and 1996-2001. It examines whether the fertility behaviour of immigrant women is tending to converge with that of Canadian-born women, and if so, how rapidly this is occurring for different immigrant groups. It also estimates the fertility of immigrants' children, the second-generation of Canadians.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003001
    Release date: 2003-12-19

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2003065
    Description:

    This paper investigates the key characteristics of the farm operators and farm businesses that influence computer use.

    Release date: 2003-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002008
    Description:

    While the number of census-farms and farm operators is shrinking, the number of jobs in the agriculture and agri-food industry is growing. During the 15-year period from 1981 to 1996, the industry employed 15% of Canada's workforce.

    Employment in the agri-food sector has grown faster than the overall Canadian economy and this has offset the decline in employment on farms. In 1981, more people worked on farms than worked in restaurants, bars and taverns. By 1996, this trend had reversed and employment in the food and beverage services sector far outstripped the number of workers on farms.

    Food processing is often promoted as part of agricultural policy (to provide a local market for Canadian farmers) and as part of rural development policy (to create jobs in rural areas). However, in 1996, fewer people were working in Canada's food processing sector than in 1981. More food was processed (there was growth in the gross domestic product (GDP) of this sector), but fewer workers were involved. Rural regions adjacent to urban areas gained a greater share of food processing employment, making these regions relatively competitive in keeping food processing workforces.

    Employment in the agricultural and agri-food sectors is growing, but the nature of the work and where it is being done is changing.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002007
    Description:

    Rural community economic diversification, or the spreading of the workforce across a variety of industrial sectors, is one solution to the problems facing rural regions and small towns. This makes communities less vulnerable to economic variability, particularly those communities that are heavily dependent on the primary industries sector. From 1986 to 1996, slightly less than one-half of rural communities were diversifying their economies and increasing their workforce. However, there are great differences found among the provinces and within regions. Communities within a region may be geographically close, but may not share the same economic characteristics. This suggests that a community's regional context does not necessarily predict and does not constrain a community's economic possibilities.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311013102
    Description:

    This article examines the changes to family wealth during the economic boom of 1984 to 1999. In the absence of longitudinal data, changes in family wealth can be estimated using cohorts of 'similar' families from two points in time.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006681
    Description:

    This article focuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Table: 97F0009X2001040
    Description:

    This table is part of the 'Immigration and Citizenship' topic, which shows 2001 Census data on immigration trends in Canada. Information is provided on Canada's immigrant or foreign-born population, including its size, origins, geographic distribution and demographic characteristics. Similar information is available for the Canadian-born population and non-permanent residents. Citizenship information from the census shows, for example, the number of immigrants who have acquired Canadian citizenship and the number of Canadians who hold dual citizenship.

    Data on the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    The following concepts related to immigration and citizenship are available from the 2001 Census: (1) birthplace of respondent (including province or territory of birth) (2) country of citizenship (3) immigrant status (4) period or year of immigration and (5) age at immigration.

    In addition, for the first time since the 1971 Census, the 2001 Census asked a question on the birthplace of parents. Responses to this question can be used to assess the socio-economic conditions of second-generation Canadians (that is, the Canadian-born children of foreign-born parents).

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0009XIE2001040.

    Release date: 2003-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002006
    Description:

    The health of Canada's rural people has gained increased attention over the past few years as studies have shown that the health status of those living in rural and remote regions of Canada is lagging behind that of urban residents. The objective of this analysis is to compare a number of key health indicators between rural and urban regions in Canada to determine if the type of region in which a person lives is associated with the health of the population

    The analysis for this report is based on data acquired from Statistic Canada's 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey. The survey population is segmented into four types of metropolitan regions (large metro-central, large metro-fringe, mid-sized metro and small metro) and four types of non-metropolitan regions (small cities, towns, rural and northern).

    This study finds that the self-rated health of Canadians (those reporting their health as excellent) declines from the most urban regions of the nation to the most rural and remote parts. The research points to personal health risk factors including being overweight (i.e., high body mass index) and smoking as being significantly higher in small town regions, rural regions and northern regions of Canada. In addition, the northern regions of Canada show a significantly higher than average share of the population who have high blood pressure or suffer from major depressive episodes. Rural regions (non-metro-adjacent) and small metropolitan regions have a higher than average prevalence of arthritis/rheumatism, even after standardizing for age.

    Release date: 2003-10-21

  • Table: 89-587-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 35, 000 adults (aged 15 and over) and 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in private or collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves, and in the Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut were excluded from the survey. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, in the fall of 2001.

    These tables contain data on the educational attainment, labour force activity and income of adults with and without disabilities.

    Release date: 2003-09-11

  • Table: 89-583-X
    Description:

    Cycle 16 of the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS) was on 'Aging and Social Support.' Data were collected over an 11-month period from February to December 2002 with a sample of approximately 25,000 respondents representing the non-institutionalized population in the 10 provinces.

    These tables contain data on the prevalence of care received by seniors because of long-term health problems, the prevalence of informal care given to seniors because of long-term health problems and consequences of providing care to seniors. All tables are available by sex and age groups, and for Canada and the provinces.

    Note: For a detailed analysis, please see the document 'The Consequences of Caring for an Aging Society' (Catalogue no. 89-582-XIE).

    Release date: 2003-09-02

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-582-X
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is to use data from the General Social Survey of 1996 and 2002 to examine the topic of caregiving. This paper answers the following questions: Is a larger share of the senior population receiving care for long-term health problems? What are the characteristics of the seniors receiving formal and informal care? What are the characteristics of the informal care providers? What are the consequences of providing informal care to seniors?

    Release date: 2003-09-02

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003001
    Description:

    This study explores the relationship involving work, parenthood and time scarcity by comparing the experiences of women and men who have recently become parents. It examines how the transition to parenthood affects men and women differently with respect to time use, division of labour and perceptions of time.

    Release date: 2003-07-21

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006541
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on the nature and extent of spousal violence and on the police response to incidents reported to them.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020026549
    Description:

    This article examines trends in how Canadians donate their time and money to arts and culture organizations, using results from the 2000 and 1997 cycles of the National Survey on Giving, Volunteering and Participating.

    Release date: 2003-06-20

  • Table: 97F0022X2001002
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Religions in Canada," which presents 2001 Census data on the size and composition, as well as on the geographical distribution of religions in Canada.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002005
    Description:

    The educational attainment of Canadians has risen considerably over the last two decades. The average years of schooling of the population aged 25 to 54 has grown from 11.8 years in 1981 to 13.3 years in 1996. Yet it is generally perceived that spatial disparities in educational attainment remain substantial. This bulletin investigates the spatial patterns in educational attainment and how they have changed since 1981. A better understanding of subprovincial patterns and trends can support federal and provincial policy making in this area of concern.

    Release date: 2003-06-12

  • Table: 97F0022X2001001
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Religions in Canada," which presents 2001 Census data on the size and composition, as well as on the geographical distribution of religions in Canada.

    This table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Religions in Canada, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0022XCB01000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0022XIE2001001.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Table: 97F0022X2001004
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Religions in Canada," which presents 2001 Census data on the size and composition, as well as on the geographical distribution of religions in Canada.

    This table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Religions in Canada, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0022XCB01000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0022XIE2001004.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Table: 97F0022X2001005
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Religions in Canada," which presents 2001 Census data on the size and composition, as well as on the geographical distribution of religions in Canada.

    This table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Religions in Canada, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0022XCB01000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0022XIE2001005.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Table: 97F0024X2001015
    Description:

    These data tables present 2001 Census highlights for selected religions in Canada.

    The tables were available on the official day-of-release for each of the census topics at various levels of geography. They present information highlights through key indicators, such as the 2001 counts and percentage distribution. The tables also allow users to perform simple rank and sort functions.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Table: 95F0450X2001001
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions, census subdivisions and dissemination areas.

    This table is part of the topic 'Religions in Canada', which presents 2001 Census data on the size and composition, as well as on the geographical distribution, of religions in Canada.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Table: 95F0450X2001002
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: census metropolitan areas, tracted census agglomerations and census tracts.

    This table is part of the topic 'Religions in Canada', which presents 2001 Census data on the size and composition, as well as on the geographical distribution, of religions in Canada.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Table: 95F0450X2001003
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (1996 Representation Order).

    This table is part of the topic 'Religions in Canada,' which presents 2001 Census data on the size and composition, as well as on the geographical distribution, of religions in Canada.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Table: 95F0450X2001004
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    This table is part of the topic 'Religions in Canada', which presents 2001 Census data on the size and composition, as well as on the geographical distribution, of religions in Canada.

    This data table can be found in the Topic bundle: Religions in Canada, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0022XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet Catalogue No. 95F0450XIE2001004.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

Data (15)

Data (15) (15 of 15 results)

Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20020009227
    Description:

    The first assesses how the fertility of immigrant women evolved between 1976-1981 and 1996-2001. It examines whether the fertility behaviour of immigrant women is tending to converge with that of Canadian-born women, and if so, how rapidly this is occurring for different immigrant groups. It also estimates the fertility of immigrants' children, the second-generation of Canadians.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003001
    Release date: 2003-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002008
    Description:

    While the number of census-farms and farm operators is shrinking, the number of jobs in the agriculture and agri-food industry is growing. During the 15-year period from 1981 to 1996, the industry employed 15% of Canada's workforce.

    Employment in the agri-food sector has grown faster than the overall Canadian economy and this has offset the decline in employment on farms. In 1981, more people worked on farms than worked in restaurants, bars and taverns. By 1996, this trend had reversed and employment in the food and beverage services sector far outstripped the number of workers on farms.

    Food processing is often promoted as part of agricultural policy (to provide a local market for Canadian farmers) and as part of rural development policy (to create jobs in rural areas). However, in 1996, fewer people were working in Canada's food processing sector than in 1981. More food was processed (there was growth in the gross domestic product (GDP) of this sector), but fewer workers were involved. Rural regions adjacent to urban areas gained a greater share of food processing employment, making these regions relatively competitive in keeping food processing workforces.

    Employment in the agricultural and agri-food sectors is growing, but the nature of the work and where it is being done is changing.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002007
    Description:

    Rural community economic diversification, or the spreading of the workforce across a variety of industrial sectors, is one solution to the problems facing rural regions and small towns. This makes communities less vulnerable to economic variability, particularly those communities that are heavily dependent on the primary industries sector. From 1986 to 1996, slightly less than one-half of rural communities were diversifying their economies and increasing their workforce. However, there are great differences found among the provinces and within regions. Communities within a region may be geographically close, but may not share the same economic characteristics. This suggests that a community's regional context does not necessarily predict and does not constrain a community's economic possibilities.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311013102
    Description:

    This article examines the changes to family wealth during the economic boom of 1984 to 1999. In the absence of longitudinal data, changes in family wealth can be estimated using cohorts of 'similar' families from two points in time.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006681
    Description:

    This article focuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002006
    Description:

    The health of Canada's rural people has gained increased attention over the past few years as studies have shown that the health status of those living in rural and remote regions of Canada is lagging behind that of urban residents. The objective of this analysis is to compare a number of key health indicators between rural and urban regions in Canada to determine if the type of region in which a person lives is associated with the health of the population

    The analysis for this report is based on data acquired from Statistic Canada's 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey. The survey population is segmented into four types of metropolitan regions (large metro-central, large metro-fringe, mid-sized metro and small metro) and four types of non-metropolitan regions (small cities, towns, rural and northern).

    This study finds that the self-rated health of Canadians (those reporting their health as excellent) declines from the most urban regions of the nation to the most rural and remote parts. The research points to personal health risk factors including being overweight (i.e., high body mass index) and smoking as being significantly higher in small town regions, rural regions and northern regions of Canada. In addition, the northern regions of Canada show a significantly higher than average share of the population who have high blood pressure or suffer from major depressive episodes. Rural regions (non-metro-adjacent) and small metropolitan regions have a higher than average prevalence of arthritis/rheumatism, even after standardizing for age.

    Release date: 2003-10-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-582-X
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is to use data from the General Social Survey of 1996 and 2002 to examine the topic of caregiving. This paper answers the following questions: Is a larger share of the senior population receiving care for long-term health problems? What are the characteristics of the seniors receiving formal and informal care? What are the characteristics of the informal care providers? What are the consequences of providing informal care to seniors?

    Release date: 2003-09-02

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003001
    Description:

    This study explores the relationship involving work, parenthood and time scarcity by comparing the experiences of women and men who have recently become parents. It examines how the transition to parenthood affects men and women differently with respect to time use, division of labour and perceptions of time.

    Release date: 2003-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020026549
    Description:

    This article examines trends in how Canadians donate their time and money to arts and culture organizations, using results from the 2000 and 1997 cycles of the National Survey on Giving, Volunteering and Participating.

    Release date: 2003-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002005
    Description:

    The educational attainment of Canadians has risen considerably over the last two decades. The average years of schooling of the population aged 25 to 54 has grown from 11.8 years in 1981 to 13.3 years in 1996. Yet it is generally perceived that spatial disparities in educational attainment remain substantial. This bulletin investigates the spatial patterns in educational attainment and how they have changed since 1981. A better understanding of subprovincial patterns and trends can support federal and provincial policy making in this area of concern.

    Release date: 2003-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001015
    Description:

    This topic presents trends on the religious affiliations of Canadians, focusing on the past decade (1991-2001). Information is provided on the size, geographic distribution and selected demographic characteristics of religious denominations.

    The same information is available on the segment of the population reporting "No religion".

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002004
    Description:

    This paper applies a broad set of disparity measures to subprovincial income data in Canada. The data used in this research come from income tax returns from 1992 to 1999, for about 280 census divisions covering the entire country. This approach provides an understanding of the spatial structure of income disparity with a high level of geographical resolution, which also highlights the evolution of the rural/urban divide. Since the period of study is short, the results are particularly relevant in understanding the spatial characteristics of the growth that occurred during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2003-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003192
    Description:

    The 1990s were characterized by substantial declines in the number of welfare recipients in most Canadian provinces. These declines occurred in a period when most provincial governments lowered benefits and tightened eligibility rules. What happened to the economic well-being of those who left welfare in the 1990s? Using longitudinal tax data, this study examines the short and long-term outcomes of welfare leavers across three dimensions: earnings, disposable income and low-income. The role of marriage in post-welfare outcomes is also investigated.

    Release date: 2003-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046499
    Description:

    This article examines what happens to the time use of young people when they add a job to their daily schedule.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046493
    Description:

    This article highlights areas of high and low attendance throughout Canada and examines factors that affect religious attendance including demographics, immigration patterns and the cultural history of the region.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002003
    Description:

    The revitalization of rural areas in Canada remains a priority among policy-makers. Associated with this is an increase in interest in the financial circumstances of females residing in rural areas. Employment is an important indicator of economic circumstance.

    This bulletin analyses rural-urban differences in the patterns of employment of males and females. Gender employment discrepancies that are either enhanced or reduced by rurality are revealed. The following employment indicators are examined: 1. overall employment levels and rates; 2. full-time and part-time employment rates; 3. reasons for undertaking part-time employment; 4. paid and unpaid overtime.

    Release date: 2003-02-14

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

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