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All (26)

All (26) (25 of 26 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038965
    Description:

    Young adults are often viewed as uninterested in political activity. This article outlines the extent of political engagement among young adults in their 20s, as measured by traditional (voting) and alternative (non-voting) political participation. It then examines some of the links between young adults' selected characteristics and their political behaviours such as voting, signing petitions, boycotting certain products, attending public meetings or participating in demonstrations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Public use microdata: 12M0016X
    Description:

    Cycle 16 of the GSS is the second cycle (after cycle 11) to collect information social support for older Canadians, introducing modules on preparations for retirement and retirement experience. The GSS is an annual telephone survey covering the non-institutionalized population in the 10 provinces. Respondents were randomly selected from a list of individuals aged 45 and over who had responded to another Statistics Canada survey. Data were collected over an 11-month period from February to December 2002. The representative sample had about 25,000 respondents. The response rate was almost 84%.

    The main objective of the 2002 GSS was to provide data on the aging population. However, the survey allows detailed analysis of characteristics of family and friends who provide care to seniors; characteristics of seniors receiving formal and informal care; links to broader determinants of health (such as income, education and social networks); and people's retirement plans and experiences.

    Release date: 2005-11-28

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2005076
    Description:

    This report reviews the literature related to the spatial variation of skills and human capital and its implication for local innovation capacity and economic development. The report develops around three major themes 1) skills and human capital; 2) innovation and technological change; and 3) growth.

    Release date: 2005-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005267
    Description:

    We analyze the intergenerational income mobility of Canadians born to immigrants using the 2001 Census. A detailed portrait of the Canadian population is offered as are estimates of the degree of generational mobility among the children of immigrants from 70 countries. The degree of persistence as estimated in regression to the mean models is about the same for immigrants as for the entire population, and there is more generational mobility among immigrants in Canada than in the United States. We also use quantile regressions to distinguish between the role of social capital from other constraints limiting mobility and find that these are present and associated with father's education.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050088449
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse geographic income disparities in Canada from the perspective of provinces and especially urban and rural areas. In particular, it looks at how per capita incomes vary across the urban-rural continuum - that is, how per capita incomes in large cities like Toronto and Montreal compare with medium sized cities like Halifax and Victoria, small cities like Brandon and Drummondville and with rural areas.

    Release date: 2005-08-11

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005005
    Description:

    This bulletin examines the number and characteristics of travellers to rural Canada in 2002 in order to develop an initial understanding.

    Release date: 2005-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2005012
    Description:

    This paper describes per capita employment income disparities across provinces and across the urban-rural continuum, from larger to small cities and between cities and rural areas. Its first objective is to compare the degree of income disparities across provinces to income disparities across the urban-rural continuum. Its second objective is to determine the extent to which provincial disparities can be tied to the urban-rural composition of provinces. The paper also seeks to determine whether urban-rural disparities in per capita employment income stem from poorer labour market conditions in smaller cities and rural areas compared to large cities.

    Release date: 2005-07-21

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008647
    Description:

    This chapter examines homicide-suicide trends involving three populations; spouses, children and youth under the age of 18 and older adults (65 years of age and older). The following analysis use data from the Homicide Survey explores the Homicide narratives to add contextual information.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008645
    Description:

    In the past decade, four large-scale victimization surveys have been conducted to obtain national population estimates of stalking. These surveys have been carried out in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia and Canada. For the first time in Statistics Canada measured stalking through the General Social Survey on Victimization (GSS). The present analysis details the prevalence of stalking in Canada, describing victim characteristics, victim'offender relationships, types of stalking experienced, violent stalking relationships, help-seeking behaviour of stalking victims, emotional consequences of stalking, reasons for reporting or not reporting the stalking to the police, types of charges laid against stalkers, and the use and breach of restraining orders.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008644
    Description:

    Recently, through the General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, questions related to spousal violence against women and men were repeated. Results of this survey permit the analysis of how spousal violence has changed in nature and extent over the two cycles of the survey from and, for the first time, provide trends on male spousal violence. As will be highlighted in this chapter, the GSS illustrates that overall spousal violence rates have remained stable, but violence in previous relationships has decreased for both women and men and continues to be more common than in current relationships. In addition, the data continue to show that violence is more prevalent in common-law relationships than in marital unions, and although relatively equal proportions of women and men report some type of spousal violence, women continue to suffer more serious and repeated spousal violence than do men and incur more serious consequences as a result of this violence.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 61-533-X
    Description:

    This publication provides the first national portrait of the many thousands of nonprofit and voluntary organizations found in every Canadian community. The data, from the National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations, reveal a set of organizations that are widely diverse in nature, touching virtually every aspect of Canadians' lives.

    Release date: 2005-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005004
    Description:

    This bulletin uses General Social Survey (GSS), cycle 17 data to examine various aspects of social engagement, social cohesion and social participation.

    Release date: 2005-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017941
    Description:

    We live in an aging society. And much has been written about how care will be provided to an aging population. We can't stop aging, and our capacity to affect our health as we age is limited, but the size, quality and proximity of people's social networks are arguably among the things that determine whether seniors receive formal care delivered by professionals, rely on informal care provided by family and friends or, indeed, receive no care at all.

    In this article, we look at the relationship between the social networks of non-institutionalized seniors and whether they receive formal, informal or no care.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005003
    Description:

    This study documents the number and characteristics of growing, stable and declining communities and regions between 1981 and 2001 and puts them into a geographical perspective in terms of the degree of rurality.

    Release date: 2005-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050037842
    Description:

    For the purposes of this study, eight environmental management systems (EMSs) were considered: whole farm environmental plan; manure management plan; fertilizer management plan; pesticide management plan; water management plan; wildlife conservation plan; grazing management plan, and nutrient management plan.

    The information on the use of farm environmental plans was obtained from the Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS) conducted in 2001 by Statistics Canada and sponsored in part by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

    Release date: 2005-05-25

  • Public use microdata: 89M0019X
    Description:

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey (2002) provides information on how people's backgrounds affect their participation in Canada's social, economic and cultural life of Canada. As well, it indicates how Canadians of different ethnic backgrounds interpret and report their ethnicity. Topics covered in the survey include ethnic ancestry, ethnic identity, place of birth, visible minority status, religion, religious participation, knowledge of languages, family background, family interaction, social networks, civic participation, interaction with society, attitudes, satisfaction with life, trust and socio-economic activities.

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) was a post-censal survey which included about 42,500 people aged 15 and over who were interviewed by telephone in the 10 provinces between April and August 2002. The target population did not include persons living in collective dwellings, persons living on Indian reserves, persons declaring an Aboriginal origin or identity in the 2001 Census, or persons living in Northern and remote areas.

    The accompanying documentation is intended to facilitate use of the 2002 EDS public use microdata file. It contains contains information on survey methodology, variables and estimation procedures as well as the rules governing the dissemination of estimates.

    Release date: 2005-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510213136
    Description:

    Over the past several decades, women have made significant inroads into many traditionally male-dominated occupations. One of these is university teaching. The article looks at the growth in the number of women teaching full time at Canadian universities between 1990-91 and 2002-03, examining changes in their representation by academic rank, tenure, and field of instruction.

    Release date: 2005-03-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 61-533-S
    Description:

    This booklet summarizes the key results of the first National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations. These organizations have a significant economic presence and serve as vehicles for citizen engagement. However, many report significant challenges to their capacity to fulfill their missions.

    Release date: 2005-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047774
    Description:

    The people of Canada have a long tradition of identifying themselves according to the land or nation of their sometimes remote ancestors. Over the past few decades, however, a rapidly growing number have begun describing themselves in the census as Canadians. The proportion of the population claiming some element of Canadian ethno-cultural ancestry climbed from fewer than 1% in 1986 to nearly 40% in 2001, making it by far the most common ethno-cultural ancestry reported on the census.

    Using data from the censuses of population, this article explores the potential reasons behind these changes. It begins by discussing our understanding of ethnicity and how it has changed over time. The article then reviews some of the meanings attached specifically to Canadian ethnicity and follows by examining the characteristics of individuals who, according to the 2001 Census, reported having a Canadian ethnic background.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047777
    Description:

    Self-employment is more common in rural than urban Canada. In 2001, about one in four workers in rural areas, villages and small towns earned at least some of their income from self-employment, compared with only one in six in Canada as a whole. Of course, farming is a key element explaining high self-employment rates in rural and small town Canada. But although farm self-employment remains a key source of income and employment for many, its importance has declined and self-employment activity on the non-farm side has been increasing rapidly.

    The forces driving self-employment in smaller labour markets may be complex, but there is no doubt that entrepreneurship is thriving in rural Canada, despite the waning importance of farm self-employment. This article uses data from the Census of Population to describe non-farm self-employment among workers aged 20 to 64 living in Canada's rural areas and small towns.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005002
    Description:

    This bulletin investigates the spatial distribution of occupational structure and its change between 1991 and 2001.

    Release date: 2005-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005001
    Description:

    This bulletin examines the trends in agricultural and non-agricultural land use across Canada from 1951-2001. The analysis updates the earlier reports by Hofmann(2001) and Statistics Canada (2001).

    Release date: 2005-01-31

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2005001
    Description:

    Comparative analysis of poverty dynamics incidence - transitions, and persistence - can yield important insights about the nature of poverty and the effectiveness of alternative policy responses. This manuscript compares poverty dynamics in four advanced industrial countries (Canada, unified Germany, Great Britain, and the United States) for overlapping six-year periods in the 1990s. The data indicate that poverty persistence is higher in North America than in Europe; for example, despite high incidence, poverty in Great Britain is relatively transitory. Most poverty transitions, and the prevalence of chronic poverty, are associated with employment instability and family dissolution in all four countries. The results also suggest that differences in social policy are crucial for the observed differences in poverty incidence and persistence between Europe and North America.

    Release date: 2005-01-31

Data (7)

Data (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Public use microdata: 12M0016X
    Description:

    Cycle 16 of the GSS is the second cycle (after cycle 11) to collect information social support for older Canadians, introducing modules on preparations for retirement and retirement experience. The GSS is an annual telephone survey covering the non-institutionalized population in the 10 provinces. Respondents were randomly selected from a list of individuals aged 45 and over who had responded to another Statistics Canada survey. Data were collected over an 11-month period from February to December 2002. The representative sample had about 25,000 respondents. The response rate was almost 84%.

    The main objective of the 2002 GSS was to provide data on the aging population. However, the survey allows detailed analysis of characteristics of family and friends who provide care to seniors; characteristics of seniors receiving formal and informal care; links to broader determinants of health (such as income, education and social networks); and people's retirement plans and experiences.

    Release date: 2005-11-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008647
    Description:

    This chapter examines homicide-suicide trends involving three populations; spouses, children and youth under the age of 18 and older adults (65 years of age and older). The following analysis use data from the Homicide Survey explores the Homicide narratives to add contextual information.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008645
    Description:

    In the past decade, four large-scale victimization surveys have been conducted to obtain national population estimates of stalking. These surveys have been carried out in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia and Canada. For the first time in Statistics Canada measured stalking through the General Social Survey on Victimization (GSS). The present analysis details the prevalence of stalking in Canada, describing victim characteristics, victim'offender relationships, types of stalking experienced, violent stalking relationships, help-seeking behaviour of stalking victims, emotional consequences of stalking, reasons for reporting or not reporting the stalking to the police, types of charges laid against stalkers, and the use and breach of restraining orders.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008644
    Description:

    Recently, through the General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, questions related to spousal violence against women and men were repeated. Results of this survey permit the analysis of how spousal violence has changed in nature and extent over the two cycles of the survey from and, for the first time, provide trends on male spousal violence. As will be highlighted in this chapter, the GSS illustrates that overall spousal violence rates have remained stable, but violence in previous relationships has decreased for both women and men and continues to be more common than in current relationships. In addition, the data continue to show that violence is more prevalent in common-law relationships than in marital unions, and although relatively equal proportions of women and men report some type of spousal violence, women continue to suffer more serious and repeated spousal violence than do men and incur more serious consequences as a result of this violence.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 61-533-X
    Description:

    This publication provides the first national portrait of the many thousands of nonprofit and voluntary organizations found in every Canadian community. The data, from the National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations, reveal a set of organizations that are widely diverse in nature, touching virtually every aspect of Canadians' lives.

    Release date: 2005-06-30

  • Public use microdata: 89M0019X
    Description:

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey (2002) provides information on how people's backgrounds affect their participation in Canada's social, economic and cultural life of Canada. As well, it indicates how Canadians of different ethnic backgrounds interpret and report their ethnicity. Topics covered in the survey include ethnic ancestry, ethnic identity, place of birth, visible minority status, religion, religious participation, knowledge of languages, family background, family interaction, social networks, civic participation, interaction with society, attitudes, satisfaction with life, trust and socio-economic activities.

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) was a post-censal survey which included about 42,500 people aged 15 and over who were interviewed by telephone in the 10 provinces between April and August 2002. The target population did not include persons living in collective dwellings, persons living on Indian reserves, persons declaring an Aboriginal origin or identity in the 2001 Census, or persons living in Northern and remote areas.

    The accompanying documentation is intended to facilitate use of the 2002 EDS public use microdata file. It contains contains information on survey methodology, variables and estimation procedures as well as the rules governing the dissemination of estimates.

    Release date: 2005-05-10

Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038965
    Description:

    Young adults are often viewed as uninterested in political activity. This article outlines the extent of political engagement among young adults in their 20s, as measured by traditional (voting) and alternative (non-voting) political participation. It then examines some of the links between young adults' selected characteristics and their political behaviours such as voting, signing petitions, boycotting certain products, attending public meetings or participating in demonstrations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005267
    Description:

    We analyze the intergenerational income mobility of Canadians born to immigrants using the 2001 Census. A detailed portrait of the Canadian population is offered as are estimates of the degree of generational mobility among the children of immigrants from 70 countries. The degree of persistence as estimated in regression to the mean models is about the same for immigrants as for the entire population, and there is more generational mobility among immigrants in Canada than in the United States. We also use quantile regressions to distinguish between the role of social capital from other constraints limiting mobility and find that these are present and associated with father's education.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050088449
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse geographic income disparities in Canada from the perspective of provinces and especially urban and rural areas. In particular, it looks at how per capita incomes vary across the urban-rural continuum - that is, how per capita incomes in large cities like Toronto and Montreal compare with medium sized cities like Halifax and Victoria, small cities like Brandon and Drummondville and with rural areas.

    Release date: 2005-08-11

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005005
    Description:

    This bulletin examines the number and characteristics of travellers to rural Canada in 2002 in order to develop an initial understanding.

    Release date: 2005-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2005012
    Description:

    This paper describes per capita employment income disparities across provinces and across the urban-rural continuum, from larger to small cities and between cities and rural areas. Its first objective is to compare the degree of income disparities across provinces to income disparities across the urban-rural continuum. Its second objective is to determine the extent to which provincial disparities can be tied to the urban-rural composition of provinces. The paper also seeks to determine whether urban-rural disparities in per capita employment income stem from poorer labour market conditions in smaller cities and rural areas compared to large cities.

    Release date: 2005-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005004
    Description:

    This bulletin uses General Social Survey (GSS), cycle 17 data to examine various aspects of social engagement, social cohesion and social participation.

    Release date: 2005-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017941
    Description:

    We live in an aging society. And much has been written about how care will be provided to an aging population. We can't stop aging, and our capacity to affect our health as we age is limited, but the size, quality and proximity of people's social networks are arguably among the things that determine whether seniors receive formal care delivered by professionals, rely on informal care provided by family and friends or, indeed, receive no care at all.

    In this article, we look at the relationship between the social networks of non-institutionalized seniors and whether they receive formal, informal or no care.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005003
    Description:

    This study documents the number and characteristics of growing, stable and declining communities and regions between 1981 and 2001 and puts them into a geographical perspective in terms of the degree of rurality.

    Release date: 2005-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050037842
    Description:

    For the purposes of this study, eight environmental management systems (EMSs) were considered: whole farm environmental plan; manure management plan; fertilizer management plan; pesticide management plan; water management plan; wildlife conservation plan; grazing management plan, and nutrient management plan.

    The information on the use of farm environmental plans was obtained from the Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS) conducted in 2001 by Statistics Canada and sponsored in part by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

    Release date: 2005-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510213136
    Description:

    Over the past several decades, women have made significant inroads into many traditionally male-dominated occupations. One of these is university teaching. The article looks at the growth in the number of women teaching full time at Canadian universities between 1990-91 and 2002-03, examining changes in their representation by academic rank, tenure, and field of instruction.

    Release date: 2005-03-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 61-533-S
    Description:

    This booklet summarizes the key results of the first National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations. These organizations have a significant economic presence and serve as vehicles for citizen engagement. However, many report significant challenges to their capacity to fulfill their missions.

    Release date: 2005-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047774
    Description:

    The people of Canada have a long tradition of identifying themselves according to the land or nation of their sometimes remote ancestors. Over the past few decades, however, a rapidly growing number have begun describing themselves in the census as Canadians. The proportion of the population claiming some element of Canadian ethno-cultural ancestry climbed from fewer than 1% in 1986 to nearly 40% in 2001, making it by far the most common ethno-cultural ancestry reported on the census.

    Using data from the censuses of population, this article explores the potential reasons behind these changes. It begins by discussing our understanding of ethnicity and how it has changed over time. The article then reviews some of the meanings attached specifically to Canadian ethnicity and follows by examining the characteristics of individuals who, according to the 2001 Census, reported having a Canadian ethnic background.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047777
    Description:

    Self-employment is more common in rural than urban Canada. In 2001, about one in four workers in rural areas, villages and small towns earned at least some of their income from self-employment, compared with only one in six in Canada as a whole. Of course, farming is a key element explaining high self-employment rates in rural and small town Canada. But although farm self-employment remains a key source of income and employment for many, its importance has declined and self-employment activity on the non-farm side has been increasing rapidly.

    The forces driving self-employment in smaller labour markets may be complex, but there is no doubt that entrepreneurship is thriving in rural Canada, despite the waning importance of farm self-employment. This article uses data from the Census of Population to describe non-farm self-employment among workers aged 20 to 64 living in Canada's rural areas and small towns.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005002
    Description:

    This bulletin investigates the spatial distribution of occupational structure and its change between 1991 and 2001.

    Release date: 2005-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005001
    Description:

    This bulletin examines the trends in agricultural and non-agricultural land use across Canada from 1951-2001. The analysis updates the earlier reports by Hofmann(2001) and Statistics Canada (2001).

    Release date: 2005-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2004008
    Description:

    This bulletin examines the growth in tourism employment in rural Canada over the period 1996 to 2003.

    Release date: 2005-01-07

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2005076
    Description:

    This report reviews the literature related to the spatial variation of skills and human capital and its implication for local innovation capacity and economic development. The report develops around three major themes 1) skills and human capital; 2) innovation and technological change; and 3) growth.

    Release date: 2005-11-15

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2005001
    Description:

    Comparative analysis of poverty dynamics incidence - transitions, and persistence - can yield important insights about the nature of poverty and the effectiveness of alternative policy responses. This manuscript compares poverty dynamics in four advanced industrial countries (Canada, unified Germany, Great Britain, and the United States) for overlapping six-year periods in the 1990s. The data indicate that poverty persistence is higher in North America than in Europe; for example, despite high incidence, poverty in Great Britain is relatively transitory. Most poverty transitions, and the prevalence of chronic poverty, are associated with employment instability and family dissolution in all four countries. The results also suggest that differences in social policy are crucial for the observed differences in poverty incidence and persistence between Europe and North America.

    Release date: 2005-01-31

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