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All (26)

All (26) (25 of 26 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060029274
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to examine patterns in leaving the parental home. It compares the transition process for five birth cohorts,with the focus on Wave 1 Boomers (born between 1947 and 1956) and their children in Generation X (born between 1967 and 1976). The differences in patterns of leaving the parental home are examined, and then the principal factors associated with a young person's initial launch into adulthood are identified.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060049516
    Description:

    It is generally assumed that for most workers, commuting is at best a necessary evil, at worst, a daily nightmare. But is that really the case? Using the latest data from the 2005 General Social Survey on time use, this study identifies the main factors associated with a more or less pleasant commute, focusing in particular on the mode of transportation used.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200600613314
    Description:

    As crops grow, they deplete the soil’s fertility by absorbing nutrients from the land. These nutrients, need to be replenished in order to ensure that there is something in the soil for the next year’s crops. Canadian agriculture relies heavily on commercial fertilizers as well as manure to replenish soil’s nutrients. This article examines how farmers provide their crops with the nutrients they need to grow and how these farming practices have changed over time.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060039478
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Census of Population and the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey to examine the prevalence of interreligious unions and social and demographic factors associated with their occurrence.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Public use microdata: 12M0019X
    Description:

    The core content of time use repeats that of cycle 12 (1998), cycle 7 (1992) and cycle 2 (1986), and provides data on the daily activities of Canadians. Question modules were also included on unpaid work activities, cultural activities, social networks and participation in sports. The target population of the General Social Survey consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2006-11-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X
    Description:

    This series presents detailed analyses based on the 2005 General Social Survey on Time Use data. Each report covers a specific subject developed from detailed information on the daily activities of Canadians. Links to other products related to time use are also available.

    Release date: 2006-11-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X2006003
    Description:

    The General Social Survey (GSS) is an annual survey that monitors changes and emerging trends in Canadian Society. For the fourth time in Canada, the GSS has collected national level time use data. The GSS is funded through a government initiative aimed to fill data gaps for policy research. In this paper we present the policy framework that supports the survey, and discuss the impact of that framework on the content decisions that GSS has made. Following a brief review of the major findings from the first three cycles of time use data we discuss the lessons learned and best practices in the development, collection and processing of these data in Canada. Finally, we compare the methods and content of the Canadian time use survey with the US survey.

    Release date: 2006-11-20

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2006082
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to analyze the degree of economic diversification or specialization in communities in Northern Ontario between 1981 and 2001 and its relationship to changes in the workforce.

    Release date: 2006-10-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610813169
    Description:

    Over the last four decades, the dramatic increase in dual-earner couples has also engendered an increase in wives as primary breadwinners. These women tend to be older and more educated than women who are secondary earners, and they are more frequently found in managerial and professional occupations. The article examines the earnings and characteristics of primary- and secondary-earner spouses.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713167
    Description:

    The division of labour between men and women continues to evolve. Today's couples have a much more equal partnership in sharing financial, child care and household responsibilities. This has been brought about in large part by the expanding economic role of women, which has helped erode the idea that men should be primarily responsible for paid work while women look after unpaid household and family duties.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060089290
    Description:

    As women have entered the labour force in greater numbers, gender differences in the division of labour within families have diminished, with men assuming more housework and child care. Changing work arrangements at home are also leading employers to adapt alternative work arrangements.

    Release date: 2006-08-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X2006002
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 2005 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1992 and 1998 time use surveys. It addresses whether older Canadians are aging well by examining the relative importance their time use patterns and health have on their overall life satisfaction.

    Like other countries in the Western world, Canada's population is aging. For more than a decade, our society has been concerned with the negative aspects of population aging such as how to care for those who are old, or how to manage pension schemes for increasing numbers of retirees. Yet with the impending retirement of a large cohort of baby boomers, the attention has been turned to more positive aspects of aging.

    The term 'aging well' now has become part of the language when thinking about older adults. Aging is seen as an ongoing process of managing the challenges associated with life transitions and with changing levels of personal resources such as health, wealth and social connections. Those who age well are able to find a balance or fit between their activities and these resources and to remain satisfied with their lives.

    For women and men, and for younger and older seniors, the ideal balance may differ, though for both, health is a key resource. In fact, one of the key theories of aging well is that those who are in good health have the potential to have more choices over their daily activities and are more likely to feel satisfied with their lives. Active engagement is seen as another key component of aging well.

    Time use patterns of older Canadians provide a useful window into understanding aging well. This study examines the main components of aging well-activity patterns and health of older Canadians. It considers several questions about aging well:1. What are the activity patterns of older Canadians? 2. What are the trends in activity patterns over time?

    These two questions provide a picture of how older adults are engaged in various activities and whether levels of activity patterns change with age:3. What are the levels of health of older Canadians?4. How do levels of health change with age?

    These two questions provide a picture of how the 'resource' of health may differ among older Canadians.

    5. What is the relationship among activity patterns, health and life satisfaction?This final question provides insight into the relative importance of health and activity level in aging well.

    Release date: 2006-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2006001
    Description:

    This study presents the first detailed assessment of how the education level/civic engagement nexus is influenced by the rural/urban setting.

    Release date: 2006-07-17

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X2006001
    Description:

    Using data from the General Social Survey on Time Use for 1992, 1998, and 2005, this article analyses the changes in average commute times between home and work. Information is broken down by province, selected census metropolitan areas and mode of transportation used.

    There is also an analysis of the factors involved in increased or decreased commute times for workers between home and work (during weekdays). The analysis shows that in addition to the distance from work, the metropolitan area of residence, whether or not errands are involved and the mode of transportation used all have a major impact on workers' commute times.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060019181
    Description:

    This article uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) and the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) to track the religious views and practices of Canadians and identify those groups most likely to be religious. An index of religiosity is developed based on the presence of religious affiliation, frequency of attendance at religious services, frequency of private religious practices and the importance of religion to the respondent.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060069229
    Description:

    The post-war surge of women into the labour force has slowed in recent years, mostly in western Canada. Participation rates east of the Ottawa River continue to increase, reflecting differences between east and west in day care, education, job composition, immigration and the age of women.

    Release date: 2006-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005008
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to document the nature of culture employment in rural Canada.

    Release date: 2006-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050029192
    Description:

    This study examines medication use among women aged 15 to 49, comparing pregnant women with their non-pregnant contemporaries. A portrait of women who used medication during pregnancy is also presented.

    Release date: 2006-05-05

  • Public use microdata: 95M0016X
    Description:

    This file provides data on the characteristics of the population. The 2001 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2001 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. Three files are available: the Individuals File, the Families File, and the Households and Housing File.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the subject matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. To ensure the respondents' anonymity, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas.

    Note: Please be advised that errors have been detected in the data for two variables contained on the revised version of this CD-ROM. As well, we have added a unique record identifier called PPSORT, built/included in the file for administrative purposes only.The affected variables are:Income status (2000 low income cut-offs) (INCSTP)Ethnic origin (ETHNICRA)Further details can be found in the "Errata" file offered in several formats on the new, re-issued CD-ROM.Original release date - February 8, 20051rst Correction - released August 24, 20052nd Correction - released April 26, 2006

    Release date: 2006-04-26

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005007
    Description:

    The objective of this bulletin is to document the trend in the price to move goods, information and people across space.

    Release date: 2006-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049125
    Description:

    Using the 2003 General Social Survey (GSS), this paper examines the extent of helping behaviours given and received by young adults aged 15 to 24. This age group was chosen because the positive social behaviours of young adults are not often examined. Particular helping behaviours given and received in the month prior to the survey included providing emotional support; teaching, coaching, or giving practical advice; providing transportation or running errands; doing domestic work, home maintenance or outdoor work; helping with child care; or other forms of help.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610213158
    Description:

    Employment equity and human rights legislation ensures access to the labour market for those with disabilities. Accommodating them in their job and in the workplace is an important part of the issue. A look at the types and severity of disabilities experienced by those aged 15 to 64 in the labour force, and a comparison of some of their characteristics with the non-disabled population.

    Release date: 2006-03-20

Data (4)

Data (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Public use microdata: 12M0019X
    Description:

    The core content of time use repeats that of cycle 12 (1998), cycle 7 (1992) and cycle 2 (1986), and provides data on the daily activities of Canadians. Question modules were also included on unpaid work activities, cultural activities, social networks and participation in sports. The target population of the General Social Survey consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2006-11-20

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Public use microdata: 95M0016X
    Description:

    This file provides data on the characteristics of the population. The 2001 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2001 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. Three files are available: the Individuals File, the Families File, and the Households and Housing File.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the subject matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. To ensure the respondents' anonymity, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas.

    Note: Please be advised that errors have been detected in the data for two variables contained on the revised version of this CD-ROM. As well, we have added a unique record identifier called PPSORT, built/included in the file for administrative purposes only.The affected variables are:Income status (2000 low income cut-offs) (INCSTP)Ethnic origin (ETHNICRA)Further details can be found in the "Errata" file offered in several formats on the new, re-issued CD-ROM.Original release date - February 8, 20051rst Correction - released August 24, 20052nd Correction - released April 26, 2006

    Release date: 2006-04-26

Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060029274
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to examine patterns in leaving the parental home. It compares the transition process for five birth cohorts,with the focus on Wave 1 Boomers (born between 1947 and 1956) and their children in Generation X (born between 1967 and 1976). The differences in patterns of leaving the parental home are examined, and then the principal factors associated with a young person's initial launch into adulthood are identified.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060049516
    Description:

    It is generally assumed that for most workers, commuting is at best a necessary evil, at worst, a daily nightmare. But is that really the case? Using the latest data from the 2005 General Social Survey on time use, this study identifies the main factors associated with a more or less pleasant commute, focusing in particular on the mode of transportation used.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200600613314
    Description:

    As crops grow, they deplete the soil’s fertility by absorbing nutrients from the land. These nutrients, need to be replenished in order to ensure that there is something in the soil for the next year’s crops. Canadian agriculture relies heavily on commercial fertilizers as well as manure to replenish soil’s nutrients. This article examines how farmers provide their crops with the nutrients they need to grow and how these farming practices have changed over time.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060039478
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Census of Population and the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey to examine the prevalence of interreligious unions and social and demographic factors associated with their occurrence.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610813169
    Description:

    Over the last four decades, the dramatic increase in dual-earner couples has also engendered an increase in wives as primary breadwinners. These women tend to be older and more educated than women who are secondary earners, and they are more frequently found in managerial and professional occupations. The article examines the earnings and characteristics of primary- and secondary-earner spouses.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713167
    Description:

    The division of labour between men and women continues to evolve. Today's couples have a much more equal partnership in sharing financial, child care and household responsibilities. This has been brought about in large part by the expanding economic role of women, which has helped erode the idea that men should be primarily responsible for paid work while women look after unpaid household and family duties.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060089290
    Description:

    As women have entered the labour force in greater numbers, gender differences in the division of labour within families have diminished, with men assuming more housework and child care. Changing work arrangements at home are also leading employers to adapt alternative work arrangements.

    Release date: 2006-08-10

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2006001
    Description:

    This study presents the first detailed assessment of how the education level/civic engagement nexus is influenced by the rural/urban setting.

    Release date: 2006-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060019181
    Description:

    This article uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) and the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) to track the religious views and practices of Canadians and identify those groups most likely to be religious. An index of religiosity is developed based on the presence of religious affiliation, frequency of attendance at religious services, frequency of private religious practices and the importance of religion to the respondent.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060069229
    Description:

    The post-war surge of women into the labour force has slowed in recent years, mostly in western Canada. Participation rates east of the Ottawa River continue to increase, reflecting differences between east and west in day care, education, job composition, immigration and the age of women.

    Release date: 2006-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005008
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to document the nature of culture employment in rural Canada.

    Release date: 2006-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050029192
    Description:

    This study examines medication use among women aged 15 to 49, comparing pregnant women with their non-pregnant contemporaries. A portrait of women who used medication during pregnancy is also presented.

    Release date: 2006-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005007
    Description:

    The objective of this bulletin is to document the trend in the price to move goods, information and people across space.

    Release date: 2006-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049125
    Description:

    Using the 2003 General Social Survey (GSS), this paper examines the extent of helping behaviours given and received by young adults aged 15 to 24. This age group was chosen because the positive social behaviours of young adults are not often examined. Particular helping behaviours given and received in the month prior to the survey included providing emotional support; teaching, coaching, or giving practical advice; providing transportation or running errands; doing domestic work, home maintenance or outdoor work; helping with child care; or other forms of help.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610213158
    Description:

    Employment equity and human rights legislation ensures access to the labour market for those with disabilities. Accommodating them in their job and in the workplace is an important part of the issue. A look at the types and severity of disabilities experienced by those aged 15 to 64 in the labour force, and a comparison of some of their characteristics with the non-disabled population.

    Release date: 2006-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005006
    Description:

    This bulletin groups watersheds according to the share of their population that is designated as "census rural" in order to profile the rural versus urban demographic structure of watersheds across Canada.

    Release date: 2006-01-05

Reference (5)

Reference (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X
    Description:

    This series presents detailed analyses based on the 2005 General Social Survey on Time Use data. Each report covers a specific subject developed from detailed information on the daily activities of Canadians. Links to other products related to time use are also available.

    Release date: 2006-11-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X2006003
    Description:

    The General Social Survey (GSS) is an annual survey that monitors changes and emerging trends in Canadian Society. For the fourth time in Canada, the GSS has collected national level time use data. The GSS is funded through a government initiative aimed to fill data gaps for policy research. In this paper we present the policy framework that supports the survey, and discuss the impact of that framework on the content decisions that GSS has made. Following a brief review of the major findings from the first three cycles of time use data we discuss the lessons learned and best practices in the development, collection and processing of these data in Canada. Finally, we compare the methods and content of the Canadian time use survey with the US survey.

    Release date: 2006-11-20

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2006082
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to analyze the degree of economic diversification or specialization in communities in Northern Ontario between 1981 and 2001 and its relationship to changes in the workforce.

    Release date: 2006-10-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X2006002
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 2005 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1992 and 1998 time use surveys. It addresses whether older Canadians are aging well by examining the relative importance their time use patterns and health have on their overall life satisfaction.

    Like other countries in the Western world, Canada's population is aging. For more than a decade, our society has been concerned with the negative aspects of population aging such as how to care for those who are old, or how to manage pension schemes for increasing numbers of retirees. Yet with the impending retirement of a large cohort of baby boomers, the attention has been turned to more positive aspects of aging.

    The term 'aging well' now has become part of the language when thinking about older adults. Aging is seen as an ongoing process of managing the challenges associated with life transitions and with changing levels of personal resources such as health, wealth and social connections. Those who age well are able to find a balance or fit between their activities and these resources and to remain satisfied with their lives.

    For women and men, and for younger and older seniors, the ideal balance may differ, though for both, health is a key resource. In fact, one of the key theories of aging well is that those who are in good health have the potential to have more choices over their daily activities and are more likely to feel satisfied with their lives. Active engagement is seen as another key component of aging well.

    Time use patterns of older Canadians provide a useful window into understanding aging well. This study examines the main components of aging well-activity patterns and health of older Canadians. It considers several questions about aging well:1. What are the activity patterns of older Canadians? 2. What are the trends in activity patterns over time?

    These two questions provide a picture of how older adults are engaged in various activities and whether levels of activity patterns change with age:3. What are the levels of health of older Canadians?4. How do levels of health change with age?

    These two questions provide a picture of how the 'resource' of health may differ among older Canadians.

    5. What is the relationship among activity patterns, health and life satisfaction?This final question provides insight into the relative importance of health and activity level in aging well.

    Release date: 2006-07-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X2006001
    Description:

    Using data from the General Social Survey on Time Use for 1992, 1998, and 2005, this article analyses the changes in average commute times between home and work. Information is broken down by province, selected census metropolitan areas and mode of transportation used.

    There is also an analysis of the factors involved in increased or decreased commute times for workers between home and work (during weekdays). The analysis shows that in addition to the distance from work, the metropolitan area of residence, whether or not errands are involved and the mode of transportation used all have a major impact on workers' commute times.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

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