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All (12)

All (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007007
    Description:

    This bulletin updates and summarizes information on the structure and trends for the rural population of Canada, using three major definitions of rural Canada: the "census rural" definition, the "rural and small town" definition and the OECD "predominantly rural region" definition. Each definition illustrates a specific aspect of rural Canada. This analysis is entirely based on data from the Census of Population from 1981 to 2006 (Statistics Canada, 2007).

    Release date: 2008-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110705
    Description:

    Data from the General Social Survey confirm what most working age Canadians probably already know; that is, they are working longer hours either on the job or at home on unpaid domestic chores. In 2005, for example, people between the ages of 25 and 54, the years when women and men are both most likely to be part of the paid work force and raising families, spent about 9 hours per day on all work activities, including paid and unpaid work. This compared with slightly over 8 hours per day nearly 20 years ago in 1986.

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Table: Summary table
    Release date: 2008-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210621
    Description:

    "Signs of crime," which criminologists often call incivility, range from evidence of drug dealing and drug use to garbage littering the neighbourhood. When these perceptions of incivility reach levels of being considered a problem by residents, they can disrupt the community as a whole and lead to feelings of insecurity. This article will examine perceptions of incivility problems within some of Canada's census metropolitan areas. Then, it will look at patterns of perceptions of incivility problems by neighbourhood types.

    Release date: 2008-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110650
    Description:

    The percentage of the Canadian population attending religious services on a regular basis has declined over the past 20 years. According to the General Social Survey (GSS), 21% of Canadians aged 15 and over reported they attended a religious service at least once a week in 2005, down from 30% in 1985.

    Release date: 2008-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110553
    Description:

    This article examines trends in the amount of time Canadians sleep. Sleep is important for our health and for our ability to interact and be sociable with others. Comparing groups of people in different job and family situations can help to identify influences, apart from our bodies' physiology, that affect our sleep. The article also investigates the differences in sleep times consistently reported between men and women.

    Release date: 2008-04-22

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2008088
    Description:

    The results of this research show that exposure to global restructuring trends increases community vulnerability to population and employment decline. Similarly, other condititions of community distress, such as high unemployment rates and low participation rates, increase the vulnerability to decline. Community assets, such as human capital, economic diversification, and proximity to agglomerations, reduce vulnerability to population and employment decline.

    Release date: 2008-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800110509
    Description:

    Using administrative data, this Juristat is intended to provide a profile of female offenders in Canada. Police-reported data are used to present information on the nature and extent of crime among female youth and adults in 2005 and then examine trends in the rate of female youth and adults charged by police with violent and property offences from 1986 to 2005. Data are compared with crime rates among male youth and adults to illustrate differences in levels and patterns of offending. The report also examines the processing of female youth and adults through the courts and provides characteristics of adult females under federal and provincial/territorial corrections. Again, comparisons are drawn with court activity involving males and with adults males under correctional services.

    Release date: 2008-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110459
    Description:

    In this article, we explore four possible approaches to the problem of differentiating between suburban neighbourhoods and central neighbourhoods in census metropolitan areas. The advantages and limits of the four approaches are discussed in detail. In the second part, we show, using census data and selected classification tools, how the various types of neighbourhoods differ in terms of population characteristics.

    Release date: 2008-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110503
    Description:

    In this article, we focus on the relationship between the types of neighbourhoods in which people live and the use of cars for daily travel. How much do residents of peripheral areas and low-density (suburban) neighbourhoods depend on cars in their daily lives compared with residents of more "urban" neighbourhoods? To what extent can residents of central neighbourhoods go about their day-to-day business without necessarily using a car? In which metropolitan areas is exclusive use of the automobile most common?

    Release date: 2008-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007004
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to document the characteristics of the rural and urban working poor specifically, those individuals living in a low-income economic family unit in 2003, who were not full-time students and who worked for pay for at least one hour in 2003. We then present some of the factors associated with their situation.

    Release date: 2008-01-14

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007007
    Description:

    This bulletin updates and summarizes information on the structure and trends for the rural population of Canada, using three major definitions of rural Canada: the "census rural" definition, the "rural and small town" definition and the OECD "predominantly rural region" definition. Each definition illustrates a specific aspect of rural Canada. This analysis is entirely based on data from the Census of Population from 1981 to 2006 (Statistics Canada, 2007).

    Release date: 2008-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110705
    Description:

    Data from the General Social Survey confirm what most working age Canadians probably already know; that is, they are working longer hours either on the job or at home on unpaid domestic chores. In 2005, for example, people between the ages of 25 and 54, the years when women and men are both most likely to be part of the paid work force and raising families, spent about 9 hours per day on all work activities, including paid and unpaid work. This compared with slightly over 8 hours per day nearly 20 years ago in 1986.

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210621
    Description:

    "Signs of crime," which criminologists often call incivility, range from evidence of drug dealing and drug use to garbage littering the neighbourhood. When these perceptions of incivility reach levels of being considered a problem by residents, they can disrupt the community as a whole and lead to feelings of insecurity. This article will examine perceptions of incivility problems within some of Canada's census metropolitan areas. Then, it will look at patterns of perceptions of incivility problems by neighbourhood types.

    Release date: 2008-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110650
    Description:

    The percentage of the Canadian population attending religious services on a regular basis has declined over the past 20 years. According to the General Social Survey (GSS), 21% of Canadians aged 15 and over reported they attended a religious service at least once a week in 2005, down from 30% in 1985.

    Release date: 2008-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110553
    Description:

    This article examines trends in the amount of time Canadians sleep. Sleep is important for our health and for our ability to interact and be sociable with others. Comparing groups of people in different job and family situations can help to identify influences, apart from our bodies' physiology, that affect our sleep. The article also investigates the differences in sleep times consistently reported between men and women.

    Release date: 2008-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800110509
    Description:

    Using administrative data, this Juristat is intended to provide a profile of female offenders in Canada. Police-reported data are used to present information on the nature and extent of crime among female youth and adults in 2005 and then examine trends in the rate of female youth and adults charged by police with violent and property offences from 1986 to 2005. Data are compared with crime rates among male youth and adults to illustrate differences in levels and patterns of offending. The report also examines the processing of female youth and adults through the courts and provides characteristics of adult females under federal and provincial/territorial corrections. Again, comparisons are drawn with court activity involving males and with adults males under correctional services.

    Release date: 2008-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110459
    Description:

    In this article, we explore four possible approaches to the problem of differentiating between suburban neighbourhoods and central neighbourhoods in census metropolitan areas. The advantages and limits of the four approaches are discussed in detail. In the second part, we show, using census data and selected classification tools, how the various types of neighbourhoods differ in terms of population characteristics.

    Release date: 2008-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110503
    Description:

    In this article, we focus on the relationship between the types of neighbourhoods in which people live and the use of cars for daily travel. How much do residents of peripheral areas and low-density (suburban) neighbourhoods depend on cars in their daily lives compared with residents of more "urban" neighbourhoods? To what extent can residents of central neighbourhoods go about their day-to-day business without necessarily using a car? In which metropolitan areas is exclusive use of the automobile most common?

    Release date: 2008-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007004
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to document the characteristics of the rural and urban working poor specifically, those individuals living in a low-income economic family unit in 2003, who were not full-time students and who worked for pay for at least one hour in 2003. We then present some of the factors associated with their situation.

    Release date: 2008-01-14

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

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