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All (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2003065
    Description:

    This paper investigates the key characteristics of the farm operators and farm businesses that influence computer use.

    Release date: 2003-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002008
    Description:

    While the number of census-farms and farm operators is shrinking, the number of jobs in the agriculture and agri-food industry is growing. During the 15-year period from 1981 to 1996, the industry employed 15% of Canada's workforce.

    Employment in the agri-food sector has grown faster than the overall Canadian economy and this has offset the decline in employment on farms. In 1981, more people worked on farms than worked in restaurants, bars and taverns. By 1996, this trend had reversed and employment in the food and beverage services sector far outstripped the number of workers on farms.

    Food processing is often promoted as part of agricultural policy (to provide a local market for Canadian farmers) and as part of rural development policy (to create jobs in rural areas). However, in 1996, fewer people were working in Canada's food processing sector than in 1981. More food was processed (there was growth in the gross domestic product (GDP) of this sector), but fewer workers were involved. Rural regions adjacent to urban areas gained a greater share of food processing employment, making these regions relatively competitive in keeping food processing workforces.

    Employment in the agricultural and agri-food sectors is growing, but the nature of the work and where it is being done is changing.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 21F0018X
    Description:

    This slide presentation provides a profile of basic structures and trends in rural and small town Canada.

    Release date: 2001-05-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 21F0016X
    Description:

    Based on a presentation by Dr. Ivan Fellegi to the Federal Deputy Ministers' Committee on the Economic Renewal of Rural Canada in September l996, Understanding rural Canada uses charts and maps to present information on: rural demography showing population change and net migration by census division for the most recent 5-year period (l989 to l994); a focus on rural youth including information on education attained, plans for further education and ablility to use computers; rural employment, rural unemployment, rural employment in growing sectors and rural employment by small businesses; a classification of census divisions by level of average incomes and change in average incomes to show that many rural areas have lower incomes and their incomes are falling further behind; and, a typology of census divisions where rural areas are classified to rural nirvana areas, agro-rural areas, rural enclave areas, rural resourced areas and native north areas. This presentation was an outgrowth of the publication Rural Canada: a profile published by the federal Interdepartmental Committee on Rural and Remote Canada in March, l995.

    Release date: 1998-04-01

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  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002008
    Description:

    While the number of census-farms and farm operators is shrinking, the number of jobs in the agriculture and agri-food industry is growing. During the 15-year period from 1981 to 1996, the industry employed 15% of Canada's workforce.

    Employment in the agri-food sector has grown faster than the overall Canadian economy and this has offset the decline in employment on farms. In 1981, more people worked on farms than worked in restaurants, bars and taverns. By 1996, this trend had reversed and employment in the food and beverage services sector far outstripped the number of workers on farms.

    Food processing is often promoted as part of agricultural policy (to provide a local market for Canadian farmers) and as part of rural development policy (to create jobs in rural areas). However, in 1996, fewer people were working in Canada's food processing sector than in 1981. More food was processed (there was growth in the gross domestic product (GDP) of this sector), but fewer workers were involved. Rural regions adjacent to urban areas gained a greater share of food processing employment, making these regions relatively competitive in keeping food processing workforces.

    Employment in the agricultural and agri-food sectors is growing, but the nature of the work and where it is being done is changing.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 21F0018X
    Description:

    This slide presentation provides a profile of basic structures and trends in rural and small town Canada.

    Release date: 2001-05-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 21F0016X
    Description:

    Based on a presentation by Dr. Ivan Fellegi to the Federal Deputy Ministers' Committee on the Economic Renewal of Rural Canada in September l996, Understanding rural Canada uses charts and maps to present information on: rural demography showing population change and net migration by census division for the most recent 5-year period (l989 to l994); a focus on rural youth including information on education attained, plans for further education and ablility to use computers; rural employment, rural unemployment, rural employment in growing sectors and rural employment by small businesses; a classification of census divisions by level of average incomes and change in average incomes to show that many rural areas have lower incomes and their incomes are falling further behind; and, a typology of census divisions where rural areas are classified to rural nirvana areas, agro-rural areas, rural enclave areas, rural resourced areas and native north areas. This presentation was an outgrowth of the publication Rural Canada: a profile published by the federal Interdepartmental Committee on Rural and Remote Canada in March, l995.

    Release date: 1998-04-01

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