Statistics by subject – Collection and questionnaires

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All (237) (25 of 237 results)

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201700114836
    Description:

    Web-push survey data collection that uses mail contact to request responses over the Internet, while withholding alternative answering modes until later in the implementation process, has developed rapidly over the past decade. This paper describes the reasons this innovative mixing of survey contact and response modes was needed, the primary ones being the declining effectiveness of voice telephone and slower than expected development of email/web only data collection methods. Historical and institutional barriers to mixing survey modes in this manner are also discussed. Essential research on the use of U.S. Postal address lists and the effects of aural and visual communication on survey measurement are then described followed by discussion of experimental efforts to create a viable web-push methodology as an alternative to voice telephone and mail response surveys. Multiple examples of current and anticipated web-push data collection uses are provided. This paper ends with a discussion of both the great promise and significant challenge presented by greater reliance on web-push survey methods.

    Release date: 2017-06-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-648-X
    Description:

    The documents in this collection are based on data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults, a survey that examines a variety of topics on the well-being of Canadians and measures the effect of changes in certain areas on people's lives. The survey covers several topics, such as jobs, health, adult education and training, income and earnings, as well as the family dynamic. Reports on the survey content, concepts, methodology and data quality are also available.

    Release date: 2016-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2016001
    Description:

    Linkages between survey and administrative data are an increasingly common practice, due in part to the reduced burden to respondents, and to the data that can be obtained at a relatively low cost. Historical linkage, or the linkage of administrative data from previous years to the year of the survey, compounds these benefits by providing additional years of data. This paper examines the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA), which was linked to historical tax data on personal income tax returns (T1) and those collected from employers’ files (T4), among others not mentioned in this paper. It presents trends in historical linkage rates, compares the coherence of administrative data between the T1 and T4, presents the ability to use the data to create balanced panels, and uses the T1 data to produce age-earnings profiles by sex. The results show that the historical linkage rate is high (over 90% in most cases) and stable over time for respondents who are likely to file a tax return, and that the T1 and T4 administrative sources show similar earnings. Moreover, long balanced panels of up to 30 years in length (at the time of writing) can be created using LISA administrative linkage data.

    Release date: 2016-08-18

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014709
    Description:

    Traffic congestion is not limited to large cities but is also becoming a problem in medium-size cities and to roads going through cities. Among a large variety of congestion measures, six were selected for the ease of aggregation and their capacity to use the instantaneous information from CVUS-light component in 2014. From the selected measures, the Index of Congestion is potentially the only one not biased. This measure is used to illustrate different dimension of congestion on the road network.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014751
    Description:

    Practically all major retailers use scanners to record the information on their transactions with clients (consumers). These data normally include the product code, a brief description, the price and the quantity sold. This is an extremely relevant data source for statistical programs such as Statistics Canada’s Consumer Price Index (CPI), one of Canada’s most important economic indicators. Using scanner data could improve the quality of the CPI by increasing the number of prices used in calculations, expanding geographic coverage and including the quantities sold, among other things, while lowering data collection costs. However, using these data presents many challenges. An examination of scanner data from a first retailer revealed a high rate of change in product identification codes over a one-year period. The effects of these changes pose challenges from a product classification and estimate quality perspective. This article focuses on the issues associated with acquiring, classifying and examining these data to assess their quality for use in the CPI.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014746
    Description:

    Paradata research has focused on identifying opportunities for strategic improvement in data collection that could be operationally viable and lead to enhancements in quality or cost efficiency. To that end, Statistics Canada has developed and implemented a responsive collection design (RCD) strategy for computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) household surveys to maximize quality and efficiency and to potentially reduce costs. RCD is an adaptive approach to survey data collection that uses information available prior to and during data collection to adjust the collection strategy for the remaining in-progress cases. In practice, the survey managers monitor and analyze collection progress against a predetermined set of indicators for two purposes: to identify critical data-collection milestones that require significant changes to the collection approach and to adjust collection strategies to make the most efficient use of remaining available resources. In the RCD context, numerous considerations come into play when determining which aspects of data collection to adjust and how to adjust them. Paradata sources play a key role in the planning, development and implementation of active management for RCD surveys. Since 2009, Statistics Canada has conducted several RCD surveys. This paper describes Statistics Canada’s experiences in implementing and monitoring this type of surveys.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014753
    Description:

    The fact that the world is in continuous change and that new technologies are becoming widely available creates new opportunities and challenges for National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) worldwide. What if NSIs could access vast amounts of sophisticated data for free (or for a low cost) from enterprises? Could this facilitate the possibility for NSIs to disseminate more accurate indicators for the policy-makers and users, significantly reduce the response burden for companies, reduce costs for the NSIs and in the long run improve the living standards of the people in a country? The time has now come for NSIs to find the best practice to align legislation, regulations and practices in relation to scanner data and big data. Without common ground, the prospect of reaching consensus is unlikely. The discussions need to start with how to define quality. If NSIs define and approach quality differently, this will lead to a highly undesirable situation, as NSIs will move further away from harmonisation. Sweden was one of the leading countries that put these issues on the agenda for European cooperation; in 2012 Sweden implemented scanner data in the national Consumer Price Index after it was proven through research studies and statistical analyses that scanner data was significantly better than the manually collected data.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014752
    Description:

    This paper presents a new price index method for processing electronic transaction (scanner) data. Price indices are calculated as a ratio of a turnover index and a weighted quantity index. Product weights of quantities sold are computed from the deflated prices of each month in the current publication year. New products can be timely incorporated without price imputations, so that all transactions can be processed. Product weights are monthly updated and are used to calculate direct indices with respect to a fixed base month. Price indices are free of chain drift by this construction. The results are robust under departures from the methodological choices. The method is part of the Dutch CPI since January 2016, when it was first applied to mobile phones.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014707
    Description:

    The Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a monthly household survey of about 56,000 households that provides information on the Canadian labour market. Audit Trail is a Blaise programming option, for surveys like LFS with Computer Assisted Interviewing (CAI), which creates files containing every keystroke and edit and timestamp of every data collection attempt on all households. Combining such a large survey with such a complete source of paradata opens the door to in-depth data quality analysis but also quickly leads to Big Data challenges. How can meaningful information be extracted from this large set of keystrokes and timestamps? How can it help assess the quality of LFS data collection? The presentation will describe some of the challenges that were encountered, solutions that were used to address them, and results of the analysis on data quality.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014744
    Description:

    "This presentation will begin with Dr. West providing a summary of research that has been conducted on the quality and utility of paradata collected as part of the United States National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). The NSFG is the major national fertility survey in the U.S., and an important source of data on sexual activity, sexual behavior, and reproductive health for policy makers. For many years, the NSFG has been collecting various forms of paradata, including keystroke information (e.g., Couper and Kreuter 2013), call record information, detailed case disposition information, and interviewer observations related to key NSFG measures (e.g., West 2013). Dr. West will discuss some of the challenges of working with these data, in addition to evidence of their utility for nonresponse adjustment, interviewer evaluation, and/or responsive survey design purposes. Dr. Kreuter will then present research done using paradata collected as part of two panel surveys: the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) in the United States, and the Panel Labour Market and Social Security (PASS) in Germany. In both surveys, information from contacts in prior waves were experimentally used to improve contact and response rates in subsequent waves. In addition, research from PASS will be presented where interviewer observations on key outcome variables were collected to be used in nonresponse adjustment or responsive survey design decisions. Dr. Kreuter will not only present the research results but also the practical challenges in implementing the collection and use of both sets of paradata. "

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014706
    Description:

    Over the last decade, Statistics Canada’s Producer Prices Division has expanded its service producer price indexes program and continued to improve its goods and construction producer price indexes program. While the majority of price indexes are based on traditional survey methods, efforts were made to increase the use of administrative data and alternative data sources in order to reduce burden on our respondents. This paper focuses mainly on producer price programs, but also provides information on the growing importance of alternative data sources at Statistics Canada. In addition, it presents the operational challenges and risks that statistical offices could face when relying more and more on third-party outputs. Finally, it presents the tools being developed to integrate alternative data while collecting metadata.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2016003
    Description:

    This paper describes the process that led to the creation of the new Disability Screening Questions (DSQ), jointly developped by Statistics Canada and Employment and Social Development Canada. The DSQ form a new module which can be put on general population surveys to allow comparisons of persons with and without a disability. The paper explains why there are two versions of the DSQ—a long and a short one—, the difference between the two, and how each version can be used.

    Release date: 2016-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2015005
    Description:

    This infographic demonstrates the journey of data and how respondents' answers to our surveys become useful data used to make informed decisions. The infographic highlights the Labour Force Survey (LFS), the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), and the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS).

    Release date: 2015-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500114162
    Description:

    The operationalization of the Population and Housing Census in Portugal is managed by a hierarchical structure in which Statistics Portugal is at the top and local government institutions at the bottom. When the Census takes place every ten years, local governments are asked to collaborate with Statistics Portugal in the execution and monitoring of the fieldwork operations at the local level. During the Pilot Test stage of the 2011 Census, local governments were asked for additional collaboration: to answer the Perception of Risk survey, whose aim was to gather information to design a quality assurance instrument that could be used to monitor the Census operations. The response rate of the survey was desired to be 100%, however, by the deadline of data collection nearly a quarter of local governments had not responded to the survey and thus a decision was made to make a follow up mailing. In this paper, we examine whether the same conclusions could have been reached from survey without follow ups as with them and evaluate the influence of follow ups on the conception of the quality assurance instrument. Comparison of responses on a set of perception variables revealed that local governments answering previous or after the follow up did not differ. However the configuration of the quality assurance instrument changed when including follow up responses.

    Release date: 2015-06-29

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014258
    Description:

    The National Fuel Consumption Survey (FCS) was created in 2013 and is a quarterly survey that is designed to analyze distance driven and fuel consumption for passenger cars and other vehicles weighing less than 4,500 kilograms. The sampling frame consists of vehicles extracted from the vehicle registration files, which are maintained by provincial ministries. For collection, FCS uses car chips for a part of the sampled units to collect information about the trips and the fuel consumed. There are numerous advantages to using this new technology, for example, reduction in response burden, collection costs and effects on data quality. For the quarters in 2013, the sampled units were surveyed 95% via paper questionnaires and 5% with car chips, and in Q1 2014, 40% of sampled units were surveyed with car chips. This study outlines the methodology of the survey process, examines the advantages and challenges in processing and imputation for the two collection modes, presents some initial results and concludes with a summary of the lessons learned.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014253
    Description:

    New developments in computer technology, but also new challenges in society like increasing nonresponse rates and decreasing budgets may lead to changes in survey methodology for official statistics. Nowadays, web panels have become very popular in the world of market research. This raises the question whether such panels can also be used for official statistics. Can they produce high quality statistics about the general population? This paper attempts to answer this question by exploring methodological aspects like under-coverage, sample selection, and nonresponse. Statistics Netherlands carried out a test with a web panel. Some results are described.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014278
    Description:

    In January and February 2014, Statistics Canada conducted a test aiming at measuring the effectiveness of different collection strategies using an online self-reporting survey. Sampled units were contacted using mailed introductory letters and asked to complete the online survey without any interviewer contact. The objectives of this test were to measure the take-up rates for completing an online survey, and to profile the respondents/non-respondents. Different samples and letters were tested to determine the relative effectiveness of the different approaches. The results of this project will be used to inform various social surveys that are preparing to include an internet response option in their surveys. The paper will present the general methodology of the test as well as results observed from collection and the analysis of profiles.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014260
    Description:

    The Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours (SEPH) produces monthly estimates and determines the month-to-month changes for variables such as employment, earnings and hours at detailed industrial levels for Canada, the provinces and territories. In order to improve the efficiency of collection activities for this survey, an electronic questionnaire (EQ) was introduced in the fall of 2012. Given the timeframe allowed for this transition as well as the production calendar of the survey, a conversion strategy was developed for the integration of this new mode. The goal of the strategy was to ensure a good adaptation of the collection environment and also to allow the implementation of a plan of analysis that would evaluate the impact of this change on the results of the survey. This paper will give an overview of the conversion strategy, the different adjustments that were made during the transition period and the results of various evaluations that were conducted. For example, the impact of the integration of the EQ on the collection process, the response rate and the follow-up rate will be presented. In addition, the effect that this new collection mode has on the survey estimates will also be discussed. More specifically, the results of a randomized experiment that was conducted in order to determine the presence of a mode effect will be presented.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014287
    Description:

    The purpose of the EpiNano program is to monitor workers who may be exposed to intentionally produced nanomaterials in France. This program is based both on industrial hygiene data collected in businesses for the purpose of gauging exposure to nanomaterials at workstations and on data from self-administered questionnaires completed by participants. These data will subsequently be matched with health data from national medical-administrative databases (passive monitoring of health events). Follow-up questionnaires will be sent regularly to participants. This paper describes the arrangements for optimizing data collection and matching.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014276
    Description:

    In France, budget restrictions are making it more difficult to hire casual interviewers to deal with collection problems. As a result, it has become necessary to adhere to a predetermined annual work quota. For surveys of the National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE), which use a master sample, problems arise when an interviewer is on extended leave throughout the entire collection period of a survey. When that occurs, an area may cease to be covered by the survey, and this effectively generates a bias. In response to this new problem, we have implemented two methods, depending on when the problem is identified: If an area is ‘abandoned’ before or at the very beginning of collection, we carry out a ‘sub-allocation’ procedure. The procedure involves interviewing a minimum number of households in each collection area at the expense of other areas in which no collection problems have been identified. The idea is to minimize the dispersion of weights while meeting collection targets. If an area is ‘abandoned’ during collection, we prioritize the remaining surveys. Prioritization is based on a representativeness indicator (R indicator) that measures the degree of similarity between a sample and the base population. The goal of this prioritization process during collection is to get as close as possible to equal response probability for respondents. The R indicator is based on the dispersion of the estimated response probabilities of the sampled households, and it is composed of partial R indicators that measure representativeness variable by variable. These R indicators are tools that we can use to analyze collection by isolating underrepresented population groups. We can increase collection efforts for groups that have been identified beforehand. In the oral presentation, we covered these two points concisely. By contrast, this paper deals exclusively with the first point: sub-allocation. Prioritization is being implemented for the first time at INSEE for the assets survey, and it will be covered in a specific paper by A. Rebecq.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014261
    Description:

    National statistical offices are subject to two requirements that are difficult to reconcile. On the one hand, they must provide increasingly precise information on specific subjects and hard-to-reach or minority populations, using innovative methods that make the measurement more objective or ensure its confidentiality, and so on. On the other hand, they must deal with budget restrictions in a context where households are increasingly difficult to contact. This twofold demand has an impact on survey quality in the broad sense, that is, not only in terms of precision, but also in terms of relevance, comparability, coherence, clarity and timeliness. Because the cost of Internet collection is low and a large proportion of the population has an Internet connection, statistical offices see this modern collection mode as a solution to their problems. Consequently, the development of Internet collection and, more generally, of multimode collection is supposedly the solution for maximizing survey quality, particularly in terms of total survey error, because it addresses the problems of coverage, sampling, non-response or measurement while respecting budget constraints. However, while Internet collection is an inexpensive mode, it presents serious methodological problems: coverage, self-selection or selection bias, non-response and non-response adjustment difficulties, ‘satisficing,’ and so on. As a result, before developing or generalizing the use of multimode collection, the National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE) launched a wide-ranging set of experiments to study the various methodological issues, and the initial results show that multimode collection is a source of both solutions and new methodological problems.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014277
    Description:

    This article gives an overview of adaptive design elements introduced to the PASS panel survey in waves four to seven. The main focus is on experimental interventions in later phases of the fieldwork. These interventions aim at balancing the sample by prioritizing low-propensity sample members. In wave 7, interviewers received a double premium for completion of interviews with low-propensity cases in the final phase of the fieldwork. This premium was restricted to a random half of the cases with low estimated response propensity and no final status after four months of prior fieldwork. This incentive was effective in increasing interviewer effort, however, led to no significant increase in response rates.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014282
    Description:

    The IAB-Establishment Panel is the most comprehensive establishment survey in Germany with almost 16.000 firms participating every year. Face-to-face interviews with paper and pencil (PAPI) are conducted since 1993. An ongoing project examines possible effects of a change of the survey to computer aided personal interviews (CAPI) combined with a web based version of the questionnaire (CAWI). In a first step, questions about the internet access, the willingness to complete the questionnaire online and reasons for refusal were included in the 2012 wave. First results are indicating a widespread refusal to take part in a web survey. A closer look reveals that smaller establishments, long time participants and older respondents are reluctant to use the internet.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014255
    Description:

    The Brazilian Network Information Center (NIC.br) has designed and carried out a pilot project to collect data from the Web in order to produce statistics about the webpages’ characteristics. Studies on the characteristics and dimensions of the web require collecting and analyzing information from a dynamic and complex environment. The core idea was collecting data from a sample of webpages automatically by using software known as web crawler. The motivation for this paper is to disseminate the methods and results of this study as well as to show current developments related to sampling techniques in a dynamic environment.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014256
    Description:

    The American Community Survey (ACS) added an Internet data collection mode as part of a sequential mode design in 2013. The ACS currently uses a single web application for all Internet respondents, regardless of whether they respond on a personal computer or on a mobile device. As market penetration of mobile devices increases, however, more survey respondents are using tablets and smartphones to take surveys that are designed for personal computers. Using mobile devices to complete these surveys may be more difficult for respondents and this difficulty may translate to reduced data quality if respondents become frustrated or cannot navigate around usability issues. This study uses several indicators to compare data quality across computers, tablets, and smartphones and also compares the demographic characteristics of respondents that use each type of device.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

  • Table: 95F0495X2001012
    Description:

    This table contains information from the 2001 Census, presented according to the statistical area classification (SAC). The SAC groups census subdivisions according to whether they are a component of a census metropolitan area, a census agglomeration, a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ or no MIZ) or of the territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory). The SAC is used for data dissemination purposes.

    Data characteristics presented according to the SAC include age, visible minority groups, immigration, mother tongue, education, income, work and dwellings. Data are presented for Canada, provinces and territories. The data characteristics presented within this table may differ from those of other products in the "Profiles" series.

    Release date: 2004-02-27

  • Table: 75M0007X
    Description:

    The Absence from Work Survey was designed primarily to fulfill the objectives of Human Resources Development Canada. They sponsor the qualified wage loss replacement plan which applies to employers who have their own private plans to cover employee wages lost due to sickness, accident, etc. Employers who fall under the plan are granted a reduction in their quotas payable to the Unemployment Insurance Commission. The data generated from the responses to the supplement will provide input to determine the rates for quota reductions for qualified employers.

    Although the Absence from Work Survey collects information on absences from work due to illness, accident or pregnancy, it does not provide a complete picture of people who have been absent from work for these reasons because the concepts and definitions have been developed specifically for the needs of the client. Absences in this survey are defined as being at least two weeks in length, and respondents are only asked the three reasons for their most recent absence and the one preceding it.

    Release date: 1999-06-29

  • Public use microdata: 89M0005X
    Description:

    The objective of this survey was to collect attitudinal, cognitive and behavioral information regarding drinking and driving.

    Release date: 1996-10-21

Analysis (65)

Analysis (65) (25 of 65 results)

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201700114836
    Description:

    Web-push survey data collection that uses mail contact to request responses over the Internet, while withholding alternative answering modes until later in the implementation process, has developed rapidly over the past decade. This paper describes the reasons this innovative mixing of survey contact and response modes was needed, the primary ones being the declining effectiveness of voice telephone and slower than expected development of email/web only data collection methods. Historical and institutional barriers to mixing survey modes in this manner are also discussed. Essential research on the use of U.S. Postal address lists and the effects of aural and visual communication on survey measurement are then described followed by discussion of experimental efforts to create a viable web-push methodology as an alternative to voice telephone and mail response surveys. Multiple examples of current and anticipated web-push data collection uses are provided. This paper ends with a discussion of both the great promise and significant challenge presented by greater reliance on web-push survey methods.

    Release date: 2017-06-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-648-X
    Description:

    The documents in this collection are based on data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults, a survey that examines a variety of topics on the well-being of Canadians and measures the effect of changes in certain areas on people's lives. The survey covers several topics, such as jobs, health, adult education and training, income and earnings, as well as the family dynamic. Reports on the survey content, concepts, methodology and data quality are also available.

    Release date: 2016-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2016001
    Description:

    Linkages between survey and administrative data are an increasingly common practice, due in part to the reduced burden to respondents, and to the data that can be obtained at a relatively low cost. Historical linkage, or the linkage of administrative data from previous years to the year of the survey, compounds these benefits by providing additional years of data. This paper examines the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA), which was linked to historical tax data on personal income tax returns (T1) and those collected from employers’ files (T4), among others not mentioned in this paper. It presents trends in historical linkage rates, compares the coherence of administrative data between the T1 and T4, presents the ability to use the data to create balanced panels, and uses the T1 data to produce age-earnings profiles by sex. The results show that the historical linkage rate is high (over 90% in most cases) and stable over time for respondents who are likely to file a tax return, and that the T1 and T4 administrative sources show similar earnings. Moreover, long balanced panels of up to 30 years in length (at the time of writing) can be created using LISA administrative linkage data.

    Release date: 2016-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2016003
    Description:

    This paper describes the process that led to the creation of the new Disability Screening Questions (DSQ), jointly developped by Statistics Canada and Employment and Social Development Canada. The DSQ form a new module which can be put on general population surveys to allow comparisons of persons with and without a disability. The paper explains why there are two versions of the DSQ—a long and a short one—, the difference between the two, and how each version can be used.

    Release date: 2016-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2015005
    Description:

    This infographic demonstrates the journey of data and how respondents' answers to our surveys become useful data used to make informed decisions. The infographic highlights the Labour Force Survey (LFS), the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), and the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS).

    Release date: 2015-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201500114162
    Description:

    The operationalization of the Population and Housing Census in Portugal is managed by a hierarchical structure in which Statistics Portugal is at the top and local government institutions at the bottom. When the Census takes place every ten years, local governments are asked to collaborate with Statistics Portugal in the execution and monitoring of the fieldwork operations at the local level. During the Pilot Test stage of the 2011 Census, local governments were asked for additional collaboration: to answer the Perception of Risk survey, whose aim was to gather information to design a quality assurance instrument that could be used to monitor the Census operations. The response rate of the survey was desired to be 100%, however, by the deadline of data collection nearly a quarter of local governments had not responded to the survey and thus a decision was made to make a follow up mailing. In this paper, we examine whether the same conclusions could have been reached from survey without follow ups as with them and evaluate the influence of follow ups on the conception of the quality assurance instrument. Comparison of responses on a set of perception variables revealed that local governments answering previous or after the follow up did not differ. However the configuration of the quality assurance instrument changed when including follow up responses.

    Release date: 2015-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111824
    Description:

    In most surveys all sample units receive the same treatment and the same design features apply to all selected people and households. In this paper, it is explained how survey designs may be tailored to optimize quality given constraints on costs. Such designs are called adaptive survey designs. The basic ingredients of such designs are introduced, discussed and illustrated with various examples.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300511792
    Description:

    This article describes implementation of the indoor air component of the 2009 to 2011 Canadian Health Measures Survey and presents information about response rates and results of field quality control samples.

    Release date: 2013-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2013001
    Description:

    In the fall of 2008, Statistics Canada, in partnership with Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Canadian academic community, put into the field the Canadian Household Panel Survey Pilot (CHPS-Pilot). This paper describes the background of the project, the steps taken in the development of the pilot survey, and the results of a series of explorations of the data collected.

    Release date: 2013-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2013002
    Description:

    Data matching is a common practice used to reduce the response burden of respondents and to improve the quality of the information collected from respondents when the linkage method does not introduce bias. However, historical linkage, which consists in linking external records from previous years to the year of the initial wave of a survey, is relatively rare and, until now, had not been used at Statistics Canada. The present paper describes the method used to link the records from the Living in Canada Survey pilot to historical tax data on income and labour (T1 and T4 files). It presents the evolution of the linkage rate going back over time and compares earnings data collected from personal income tax returns with those collected from employers file. To illustrate the new possibilities of analysis offered by this type of linkage, the study concludes with an earnings profile by age and sex for different cohorts based on year of birth.

    Release date: 2013-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201200211752
    Description:

    Coca is a native bush from the Amazon rainforest from which cocaine, an illegal alkaloid, is extracted. Asking farmers about the extent of their coca cultivation areas is considered a sensitive question in remote coca growing regions in Peru. As a consequence, farmers tend not to participate in surveys, do not respond to the sensitive question(s), or underreport their individual coca cultivation areas. There is a political and policy concern in accurately and reliably measuring coca growing areas, therefore survey methodologists need to determine how to encourage response and truthful reporting of sensitive questions related to coca growing. Specific survey strategies applied in our case study included establishment of trust with farmers, confidentiality assurance, matching interviewer-respondent characteristics, changing the format of the sensitive question(s), and non enforcement of absolute isolation of respondents during the survey. The survey results were validated using satellite data. They suggest that farmers tend to underreport their coca areas to 35 to 40% of their true extent.

    Release date: 2012-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200311707
    Description:

    This study compares waist circumference measured using World Health Organization and National Institutes of Health protocols to determine if the results differ significantly, and whether equations can be developed to allow comparison between waist circumference taken at the two different measurement sites.

    Release date: 2012-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201200111681
    Description:

    This paper focuses on the application of graph theory to the development and testing of survey research instruments. A graph-theoretic approach offers several advantages over conventional approaches in the structure and features of a specifications system for research instruments, especially for large, computer-assisted instruments. One advantage is to verify the connectedness of all components and a second advantage is the ability to simulate an instrument. This approach also allows for the generation of measures to describe an instrument such as the number of routes and paths. The concept of a 'basis' is discussed in the context of software testing. A basis is the smallest set of paths within an instrument which covers all link-and-node pairings. These paths may be used as an economic and comprehensive set of test cases for instrument testing.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201200111680
    Description:

    Survey data are potentially affected by interviewer falsifications with data fabrication being the most blatant form. Even a small number of fabricated interviews might seriously impair the results of further empirical analysis. Besides reinterviews, some statistical approaches have been proposed for identifying this type of fraudulent behaviour. With the help of a small dataset, this paper demonstrates how cluster analysis, which is not commonly employed in this context, might be used to identify interviewers who falsify their work assignments. Several indicators are combined to classify 'at risk' interviewers based solely on the data collected. This multivariate classification seems superior to the application of a single indicator such as Benford's law.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2011001
    Description:

    In January 2006, a conference on longitudinal surveys hosted by Statistics Canada, the Social and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) and the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) concluded that Canada lacks a longitudinal survey which collects information on multiple subjects such as family, human capital, labour health and follows respondents for a long period of time. Following this conference, funds were received from the Policy Research Data Gaps fund (PRDG) to support a pilot survey for a new Canadian Household Panel Survey (CHPS-Pilot). Consultations on the design and content were held with academic and policy experts in 2007 and 2008, and a pilot survey was conducted in the fall of 2008. The objectives of the pilot survey were to (1) test a questionnaire, evaluate interview length and measure the quality of data collected, (2) evaluate several design features; and (3) test reactions to the survey from respondents and field workers. The pilot survey achieved a response rate of 76%, with a median household interview time of 64 minutes. Several innovative design features were tested, and found to be viable. Response to the survey, whether from respondents or interviewers, was generally positive. This paper highlights these and other results from the CHPS-Pilot.

    Release date: 2011-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100111404
    Description:

    This study assesses three child-reported parenting behaviour scales (nurturance, rejection and monitoring) in the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2011-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201000211383
    Description:

    Data collection for poverty assessments in Africa is time consuming, expensive and can be subject to numerous constraints. In this paper we present a procedure to collect data from poor households involved in small-scale inland fisheries as well as agricultural activities. A sampling scheme has been developed that captures the heterogeneity in ecological conditions and the seasonality of livelihood options. Sampling includes a three point panel survey of 300 households. The respondents belong to four different ethnic groups randomly chosen from three strata, each representing a different ecological zone. In the first part of the paper some background information is given on the objectives of the research, the study site and survey design, which were guiding the data collection process. The second part of the paper discusses the typical constraints that are hampering empirical work in Sub-Saharan Africa, and shows how different challenges have been resolved. These lessons could guide researchers in designing appropriate socio-economic surveys in comparable settings.

    Release date: 2010-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900110886
    Description:

    Interviewer variability is a major component of variability of survey statistics. Different strategies related to question formatting, question phrasing, interviewer training, interviewer workload, interviewer experience and interviewer assignment are employed in an effort to reduce interviewer variability. The traditional formula for measuring interviewer variability, commonly referred to as the interviewer effect, is given by ieff := deff_int = 1 + (n bar sub int - 1) rho sub int, where rho sub int and n bar sub int are the intra-interviewer correlation and the simple average of the interviewer workloads, respectively. In this article, we provide a model-assisted justification of this well-known formula for equal probability of selection methods (epsem) with no spatial clustering in the sample and equal interviewer workload. However, spatial clustering and unequal weighting are both very common in large scale surveys. In the context of a complex sampling design, we obtain an appropriate formula for the interviewer variability that takes into consideration unequal probability of selection and spatial clustering. Our formula provides a more accurate assessment of interviewer effects and thus is helpful in allocating more reasonable amount of funds to control the interviewer variability. We also propose a decomposition of the overall effect into effects due to weighting, spatial clustering and interviewers. Such a decomposition is helpful in understanding ways to reduce total variance by different means.

    Release date: 2009-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200800210755
    Description:

    Dependent interviewing (DI) is used in many longitudinal surveys to "feed forward" data from one wave to the next. Though it is a promising technique which has been demonstrated to enhance data quality in certain respects, relatively little is known about how it is actually administered in the field. This research seeks to address this issue through behavior coding. Various styles of DI were employed in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) in January, 2006, and recordings were made of pilot field interviews. These recordings were analysed to determine whether the questions (particularly the DI aspects) were administered appropriately and to explore the respondent's reaction to the fed-forward data. Of particular interest was whether respondents confirmed or challenged the previously-reported information, whether the prior wave data came into play when respondents were providing their current-wave answers, and how any discrepancies were negotiated by the interviewer and respondent. Also of interest was to examine the effectiveness of various styles of DI. For example, in some cases the prior wave data was brought forward and respondents were asked to explicitly confirm it; in other cases the previous data was read and respondents were asked if the situation was still the same. Results indicate varying levels of compliance in terms of initial question-reading, and suggest that some styles of DI may be more effective than others.

    Release date: 2008-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200800210754
    Description:

    The context of the discussion is the increasing incidence of international surveys, of which one is the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Policy Evaluation Project, which began in 2002. The ITC country surveys are longitudinal, and their aim is to evaluate the effects of policy measures being introduced in various countries under the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. The challenges of organization, data collection and analysis in international surveys are reviewed and illustrated. Analysis is an increasingly important part of the motivation for large scale cross-cultural surveys. The fundamental challenge for analysis is to discern the real response (or lack of response) to policy change, separating it from the effects of data collection mode, differential non-response, external events, time-in-sample, culture, and language. Two problems relevant to statistical analysis are discussed. The first problem is the question of when and how to analyze pooled data from several countries, in order to strengthen conclusions which might be generally valid. While in some cases this seems to be straightforward, there are differing opinions on the extent to which pooling is possible and reasonable. It is suggested that for formal comparisons, random effects models are of conceptual use. The second problem is to find models of measurement across cultures and data collection modes which will enable calibration of continuous, binary and ordinal responses, and produce comparisons from which extraneous effects have been removed. It is noted that hierarchical models provide a natural way of relaxing requirements of model invariance across groups.

    Release date: 2008-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010364
    Description:

    This article describes how the Canadian Health Measures Survey has addressed the ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) arising from the survey. The development of appropriate procedures and the rationale behind them are discussed in detail for some specific ELSI.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010362
    Description:

    This article summarizes the design, methods and results emerging from the Canadian Health Measures Survey pre-test, which took place from October through December 2004 in Calgary, Alberta.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010361
    Description:

    This article summarizes the background, history and rationale for the Canadian Health Measures Survey, and provides an overview of the objectives, methods and analysis plans.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010363
    Description:

    This overview describes the sampling strategy used to meet the collection and estimation requirements of the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010366
    Description:

    This article describes some of the logistical and operational requirement and procedures employed to perform the clinic component of the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

Reference (169)

Reference (169) (25 of 169 results)

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014709
    Description:

    Traffic congestion is not limited to large cities but is also becoming a problem in medium-size cities and to roads going through cities. Among a large variety of congestion measures, six were selected for the ease of aggregation and their capacity to use the instantaneous information from CVUS-light component in 2014. From the selected measures, the Index of Congestion is potentially the only one not biased. This measure is used to illustrate different dimension of congestion on the road network.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014751
    Description:

    Practically all major retailers use scanners to record the information on their transactions with clients (consumers). These data normally include the product code, a brief description, the price and the quantity sold. This is an extremely relevant data source for statistical programs such as Statistics Canada’s Consumer Price Index (CPI), one of Canada’s most important economic indicators. Using scanner data could improve the quality of the CPI by increasing the number of prices used in calculations, expanding geographic coverage and including the quantities sold, among other things, while lowering data collection costs. However, using these data presents many challenges. An examination of scanner data from a first retailer revealed a high rate of change in product identification codes over a one-year period. The effects of these changes pose challenges from a product classification and estimate quality perspective. This article focuses on the issues associated with acquiring, classifying and examining these data to assess their quality for use in the CPI.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014746
    Description:

    Paradata research has focused on identifying opportunities for strategic improvement in data collection that could be operationally viable and lead to enhancements in quality or cost efficiency. To that end, Statistics Canada has developed and implemented a responsive collection design (RCD) strategy for computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) household surveys to maximize quality and efficiency and to potentially reduce costs. RCD is an adaptive approach to survey data collection that uses information available prior to and during data collection to adjust the collection strategy for the remaining in-progress cases. In practice, the survey managers monitor and analyze collection progress against a predetermined set of indicators for two purposes: to identify critical data-collection milestones that require significant changes to the collection approach and to adjust collection strategies to make the most efficient use of remaining available resources. In the RCD context, numerous considerations come into play when determining which aspects of data collection to adjust and how to adjust them. Paradata sources play a key role in the planning, development and implementation of active management for RCD surveys. Since 2009, Statistics Canada has conducted several RCD surveys. This paper describes Statistics Canada’s experiences in implementing and monitoring this type of surveys.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014753
    Description:

    The fact that the world is in continuous change and that new technologies are becoming widely available creates new opportunities and challenges for National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) worldwide. What if NSIs could access vast amounts of sophisticated data for free (or for a low cost) from enterprises? Could this facilitate the possibility for NSIs to disseminate more accurate indicators for the policy-makers and users, significantly reduce the response burden for companies, reduce costs for the NSIs and in the long run improve the living standards of the people in a country? The time has now come for NSIs to find the best practice to align legislation, regulations and practices in relation to scanner data and big data. Without common ground, the prospect of reaching consensus is unlikely. The discussions need to start with how to define quality. If NSIs define and approach quality differently, this will lead to a highly undesirable situation, as NSIs will move further away from harmonisation. Sweden was one of the leading countries that put these issues on the agenda for European cooperation; in 2012 Sweden implemented scanner data in the national Consumer Price Index after it was proven through research studies and statistical analyses that scanner data was significantly better than the manually collected data.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014752
    Description:

    This paper presents a new price index method for processing electronic transaction (scanner) data. Price indices are calculated as a ratio of a turnover index and a weighted quantity index. Product weights of quantities sold are computed from the deflated prices of each month in the current publication year. New products can be timely incorporated without price imputations, so that all transactions can be processed. Product weights are monthly updated and are used to calculate direct indices with respect to a fixed base month. Price indices are free of chain drift by this construction. The results are robust under departures from the methodological choices. The method is part of the Dutch CPI since January 2016, when it was first applied to mobile phones.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014707
    Description:

    The Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a monthly household survey of about 56,000 households that provides information on the Canadian labour market. Audit Trail is a Blaise programming option, for surveys like LFS with Computer Assisted Interviewing (CAI), which creates files containing every keystroke and edit and timestamp of every data collection attempt on all households. Combining such a large survey with such a complete source of paradata opens the door to in-depth data quality analysis but also quickly leads to Big Data challenges. How can meaningful information be extracted from this large set of keystrokes and timestamps? How can it help assess the quality of LFS data collection? The presentation will describe some of the challenges that were encountered, solutions that were used to address them, and results of the analysis on data quality.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014744
    Description:

    "This presentation will begin with Dr. West providing a summary of research that has been conducted on the quality and utility of paradata collected as part of the United States National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG). The NSFG is the major national fertility survey in the U.S., and an important source of data on sexual activity, sexual behavior, and reproductive health for policy makers. For many years, the NSFG has been collecting various forms of paradata, including keystroke information (e.g., Couper and Kreuter 2013), call record information, detailed case disposition information, and interviewer observations related to key NSFG measures (e.g., West 2013). Dr. West will discuss some of the challenges of working with these data, in addition to evidence of their utility for nonresponse adjustment, interviewer evaluation, and/or responsive survey design purposes. Dr. Kreuter will then present research done using paradata collected as part of two panel surveys: the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) in the United States, and the Panel Labour Market and Social Security (PASS) in Germany. In both surveys, information from contacts in prior waves were experimentally used to improve contact and response rates in subsequent waves. In addition, research from PASS will be presented where interviewer observations on key outcome variables were collected to be used in nonresponse adjustment or responsive survey design decisions. Dr. Kreuter will not only present the research results but also the practical challenges in implementing the collection and use of both sets of paradata. "

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014706
    Description:

    Over the last decade, Statistics Canada’s Producer Prices Division has expanded its service producer price indexes program and continued to improve its goods and construction producer price indexes program. While the majority of price indexes are based on traditional survey methods, efforts were made to increase the use of administrative data and alternative data sources in order to reduce burden on our respondents. This paper focuses mainly on producer price programs, but also provides information on the growing importance of alternative data sources at Statistics Canada. In addition, it presents the operational challenges and risks that statistical offices could face when relying more and more on third-party outputs. Finally, it presents the tools being developed to integrate alternative data while collecting metadata.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014258
    Description:

    The National Fuel Consumption Survey (FCS) was created in 2013 and is a quarterly survey that is designed to analyze distance driven and fuel consumption for passenger cars and other vehicles weighing less than 4,500 kilograms. The sampling frame consists of vehicles extracted from the vehicle registration files, which are maintained by provincial ministries. For collection, FCS uses car chips for a part of the sampled units to collect information about the trips and the fuel consumed. There are numerous advantages to using this new technology, for example, reduction in response burden, collection costs and effects on data quality. For the quarters in 2013, the sampled units were surveyed 95% via paper questionnaires and 5% with car chips, and in Q1 2014, 40% of sampled units were surveyed with car chips. This study outlines the methodology of the survey process, examines the advantages and challenges in processing and imputation for the two collection modes, presents some initial results and concludes with a summary of the lessons learned.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014253
    Description:

    New developments in computer technology, but also new challenges in society like increasing nonresponse rates and decreasing budgets may lead to changes in survey methodology for official statistics. Nowadays, web panels have become very popular in the world of market research. This raises the question whether such panels can also be used for official statistics. Can they produce high quality statistics about the general population? This paper attempts to answer this question by exploring methodological aspects like under-coverage, sample selection, and nonresponse. Statistics Netherlands carried out a test with a web panel. Some results are described.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014278
    Description:

    In January and February 2014, Statistics Canada conducted a test aiming at measuring the effectiveness of different collection strategies using an online self-reporting survey. Sampled units were contacted using mailed introductory letters and asked to complete the online survey without any interviewer contact. The objectives of this test were to measure the take-up rates for completing an online survey, and to profile the respondents/non-respondents. Different samples and letters were tested to determine the relative effectiveness of the different approaches. The results of this project will be used to inform various social surveys that are preparing to include an internet response option in their surveys. The paper will present the general methodology of the test as well as results observed from collection and the analysis of profiles.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014260
    Description:

    The Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours (SEPH) produces monthly estimates and determines the month-to-month changes for variables such as employment, earnings and hours at detailed industrial levels for Canada, the provinces and territories. In order to improve the efficiency of collection activities for this survey, an electronic questionnaire (EQ) was introduced in the fall of 2012. Given the timeframe allowed for this transition as well as the production calendar of the survey, a conversion strategy was developed for the integration of this new mode. The goal of the strategy was to ensure a good adaptation of the collection environment and also to allow the implementation of a plan of analysis that would evaluate the impact of this change on the results of the survey. This paper will give an overview of the conversion strategy, the different adjustments that were made during the transition period and the results of various evaluations that were conducted. For example, the impact of the integration of the EQ on the collection process, the response rate and the follow-up rate will be presented. In addition, the effect that this new collection mode has on the survey estimates will also be discussed. More specifically, the results of a randomized experiment that was conducted in order to determine the presence of a mode effect will be presented.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014287
    Description:

    The purpose of the EpiNano program is to monitor workers who may be exposed to intentionally produced nanomaterials in France. This program is based both on industrial hygiene data collected in businesses for the purpose of gauging exposure to nanomaterials at workstations and on data from self-administered questionnaires completed by participants. These data will subsequently be matched with health data from national medical-administrative databases (passive monitoring of health events). Follow-up questionnaires will be sent regularly to participants. This paper describes the arrangements for optimizing data collection and matching.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014276
    Description:

    In France, budget restrictions are making it more difficult to hire casual interviewers to deal with collection problems. As a result, it has become necessary to adhere to a predetermined annual work quota. For surveys of the National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE), which use a master sample, problems arise when an interviewer is on extended leave throughout the entire collection period of a survey. When that occurs, an area may cease to be covered by the survey, and this effectively generates a bias. In response to this new problem, we have implemented two methods, depending on when the problem is identified: If an area is ‘abandoned’ before or at the very beginning of collection, we carry out a ‘sub-allocation’ procedure. The procedure involves interviewing a minimum number of households in each collection area at the expense of other areas in which no collection problems have been identified. The idea is to minimize the dispersion of weights while meeting collection targets. If an area is ‘abandoned’ during collection, we prioritize the remaining surveys. Prioritization is based on a representativeness indicator (R indicator) that measures the degree of similarity between a sample and the base population. The goal of this prioritization process during collection is to get as close as possible to equal response probability for respondents. The R indicator is based on the dispersion of the estimated response probabilities of the sampled households, and it is composed of partial R indicators that measure representativeness variable by variable. These R indicators are tools that we can use to analyze collection by isolating underrepresented population groups. We can increase collection efforts for groups that have been identified beforehand. In the oral presentation, we covered these two points concisely. By contrast, this paper deals exclusively with the first point: sub-allocation. Prioritization is being implemented for the first time at INSEE for the assets survey, and it will be covered in a specific paper by A. Rebecq.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014261
    Description:

    National statistical offices are subject to two requirements that are difficult to reconcile. On the one hand, they must provide increasingly precise information on specific subjects and hard-to-reach or minority populations, using innovative methods that make the measurement more objective or ensure its confidentiality, and so on. On the other hand, they must deal with budget restrictions in a context where households are increasingly difficult to contact. This twofold demand has an impact on survey quality in the broad sense, that is, not only in terms of precision, but also in terms of relevance, comparability, coherence, clarity and timeliness. Because the cost of Internet collection is low and a large proportion of the population has an Internet connection, statistical offices see this modern collection mode as a solution to their problems. Consequently, the development of Internet collection and, more generally, of multimode collection is supposedly the solution for maximizing survey quality, particularly in terms of total survey error, because it addresses the problems of coverage, sampling, non-response or measurement while respecting budget constraints. However, while Internet collection is an inexpensive mode, it presents serious methodological problems: coverage, self-selection or selection bias, non-response and non-response adjustment difficulties, ‘satisficing,’ and so on. As a result, before developing or generalizing the use of multimode collection, the National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE) launched a wide-ranging set of experiments to study the various methodological issues, and the initial results show that multimode collection is a source of both solutions and new methodological problems.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014277
    Description:

    This article gives an overview of adaptive design elements introduced to the PASS panel survey in waves four to seven. The main focus is on experimental interventions in later phases of the fieldwork. These interventions aim at balancing the sample by prioritizing low-propensity sample members. In wave 7, interviewers received a double premium for completion of interviews with low-propensity cases in the final phase of the fieldwork. This premium was restricted to a random half of the cases with low estimated response propensity and no final status after four months of prior fieldwork. This incentive was effective in increasing interviewer effort, however, led to no significant increase in response rates.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014282
    Description:

    The IAB-Establishment Panel is the most comprehensive establishment survey in Germany with almost 16.000 firms participating every year. Face-to-face interviews with paper and pencil (PAPI) are conducted since 1993. An ongoing project examines possible effects of a change of the survey to computer aided personal interviews (CAPI) combined with a web based version of the questionnaire (CAWI). In a first step, questions about the internet access, the willingness to complete the questionnaire online and reasons for refusal were included in the 2012 wave. First results are indicating a widespread refusal to take part in a web survey. A closer look reveals that smaller establishments, long time participants and older respondents are reluctant to use the internet.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014255
    Description:

    The Brazilian Network Information Center (NIC.br) has designed and carried out a pilot project to collect data from the Web in order to produce statistics about the webpages’ characteristics. Studies on the characteristics and dimensions of the web require collecting and analyzing information from a dynamic and complex environment. The core idea was collecting data from a sample of webpages automatically by using software known as web crawler. The motivation for this paper is to disseminate the methods and results of this study as well as to show current developments related to sampling techniques in a dynamic environment.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014256
    Description:

    The American Community Survey (ACS) added an Internet data collection mode as part of a sequential mode design in 2013. The ACS currently uses a single web application for all Internet respondents, regardless of whether they respond on a personal computer or on a mobile device. As market penetration of mobile devices increases, however, more survey respondents are using tablets and smartphones to take surveys that are designed for personal computers. Using mobile devices to complete these surveys may be more difficult for respondents and this difficulty may translate to reduced data quality if respondents become frustrated or cannot navigate around usability issues. This study uses several indicators to compare data quality across computers, tablets, and smartphones and also compares the demographic characteristics of respondents that use each type of device.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014254
    Description:

    Web surveys have serious shortcomings in terms of their representativeness, but they appear to have some good measurement properties. This talk focuses on the general features of web surveys that affect data quality, especially the fact that they are primarily visual in character. In addition, it examines the effectiveness of web surveys as a form of self-administration. A number of experiments have compared web surveys with other modes of data collection. A meta-analysis of these studies shows that web surveys maintain the advantages of traditional forms of self-administration; in particular, they reduce social desirability bias relative to interviewer administration of the questions. I conclude by discussing some likely future developments in web surveys—their incorporation of avatars as “virtual interviewers” and the increasing use of mobile devices (such as tablet computers and smart phones) to access and complete web surveys.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014257
    Description:

    The Canadian Vehicle Use Study is a survey conducted by Transport Canada in partnership with Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada and the provincial registrars. The study is divided in two components: the light vehicles like cars, minivans, SUVs and trucks with gross vehicle weight (GVW) less than 4.5 metric tons; the medium and heavy component with trucks of GVW of 4.5 metric tons and more. The study is the first that collects vehicle activity directly from the vehicle using electronic collection methods exclusively. This result in more information, which is very timely and reliable.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201300014263
    Description:

    Collecting information from sampled units over the Internet or by mail is much more cost-efficient than conducting interviews. These methods make self-enumeration an attractive data-collection method for surveys and censuses. Despite the benefits associated with self-enumeration data collection, in particular Internet-based data collection, self-enumeration can produce low response rates compared with interviews. To increase response rates, nonrespondents are subject to a mixed mode of follow-up treatments, which influence the resulting probability of response, to encourage them to participate. Factors and interactions are commonly used in regression analyses, and have important implications for the interpretation of statistical models. Because response occurrence is intrinsically conditional, we first record response occurrence in discrete intervals, and we characterize the probability of response by a discrete time hazard. This approach facilitates examining when a response is most likely to occur and how the probability of responding varies over time. The nonresponse bias can be avoided by multiplying the sampling weight of respondents by the inverse of an estimate of the response probability. Estimators for model parameters as well as for finite population parameters are given. Simulation results on the performance of the proposed estimators are also presented.

    Release date: 2014-10-31

  • Technical products: 12-587-X
    Description:

    This publication shows readers how to design and conduct a census or sample survey. It explains basic survey concepts and provides information on how to create efficient and high quality surveys. It is aimed at those involved in planning, conducting or managing a survey and at students of survey design courses.

    This book contains the following information:

    -how to plan and manage a survey;-how to formulate the survey objectives and design a questionnaire; -things to consider when determining a sample design (choosing between a sample or a census, defining the survey population, choosing a survey frame, identifying possible sources of survey error); -choosing a method of collection (self-enumeration, personal interviews or telephone interviews; computer-assisted versus paper-based questionnaires); -organizing and conducting data collection operations;-determining the sample size, allocating the sample across strata and selecting the sample; -methods of point estimation and variance estimation, and data analysis; -the use of administrative data, particularly during the design and estimation phases-how to process the data (which consists of all data handling activities between collection and estimation) and use quality control and quality assurance measures to minimize and control errors during various survey steps; and-disclosure control and data dissemination.

    This publication also includes a case study that illustrates the steps in developing a household survey, using the methods and principles presented in the book. This publication was previously only available in print format and originally published in 2003.

    Release date: 2010-09-27

  • Technical products: 11-522-X200800010965
    Description:

    Surveys that employ simultaneous web, CATI, and paper modes (or any two-way subset) are increasingly common. Mathematica Policy Research, Inc (MPR) has deployed several of these types of surveys in Blaise. This paper reviews MPR's experiences and issues with these efforts by addressing instrumentation, survey management, and other considerations. The paper emphasizes the electronic implementation of these surveys and covers topics that emerge solely from the surveys' multimode nature; that is, material that goes beyond the implementation of a single-mode survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Technical products: 11-522-X200800010999
    Description:

    The choice of number of call attempts in a telephone survey is an important decision. A large number of call attempts makes the data collection costly and time-consuming; and a small number of attempts decreases the response set from which conclusions are drawn and increases the variance. The decision can also have an effect on the nonresponse bias. In this paper we study the effects of number of call attempts on the nonresponse rate and the nonresponse bias in two surveys conducted by Statistics Sweden: The Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Household Finances (HF).

    By use of paradata we calculate the response rate as a function of the number of call attempts. To estimate the nonresponse bias we use estimates of some register variables, where observations are available for both respondents and nonrespondents. We also calculate estimates of some real survey parameters as functions of varying number of call attempts. The results indicate that it is possible to reduce the current number of call attempts without getting an increased nonresponse bias.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

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