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All (100)

All (100) (25 of 100 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201601214687
    Description:

    This study describes record linkage of the Canadian Community Health Survey and the Canadian Mortality Database. The article explains the record linkage process and presents results about associations between health behaviours and mortality among a representative sample of Canadians.

    Release date: 2016-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214660
    Description:

    In an economic survey of a sample of enterprises, occupations are randomly selected from a list until a number r of occupations in a local unit has been identified. This is an inverse sampling problem for which we are proposing a few solutions. Simple designs with and without replacement are processed using negative binomial distributions and negative hypergeometric distributions. We also propose estimators for when the units are selected with unequal probabilities, with or without replacement.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214663
    Description:

    We present theoretical evidence that efforts during data collection to balance the survey response with respect to selected auxiliary variables will improve the chances for low nonresponse bias in the estimates that are ultimately produced by calibrated weighting. One of our results shows that the variance of the bias – measured here as the deviation of the calibration estimator from the (unrealized) full-sample unbiased estimator – decreases linearly as a function of the response imbalance that we assume measured and controlled continuously over the data collection period. An attractive prospect is thus a lower risk of bias if one can manage the data collection to get low imbalance. The theoretical results are validated in a simulation study with real data from an Estonian household survey.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214684
    Description:

    This paper introduces an incomplete adaptive cluster sampling design that is easy to implement, controls the sample size well, and does not need to follow the neighbourhood. In this design, an initial sample is first selected, using one of the conventional designs. If a cell satisfies a prespecified condition, a specified radius around the cell is sampled completely. The population mean is estimated using the \pi-estimator. If all the inclusion probabilities are known, then an unbiased \pi estimator is available; if, depending on the situation, the inclusion probabilities are not known for some of the final sample units, then they are estimated. To estimate the inclusion probabilities, a biased estimator is constructed. However, the simulations show that if the sample size is large enough, the error of the inclusion probabilities is negligible, and the relative \pi-estimator is almost unbiased. This design rivals adaptive cluster sampling because it controls the final sample size and is easy to manage. It rivals adaptive two-stage sequential sampling because it considers the cluster form of the population and reduces the cost of moving across the area. Using real data on a bird population and simulations, the paper compares the design with adaptive two-stage sequential sampling. The simulations show that the design has significant efficiency in comparison with its rival.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214676
    Description:

    Winsorization procedures replace extreme values with less extreme values, effectively moving the original extreme values toward the center of the distribution. Winsorization therefore both detects and treats influential values. Mulry, Oliver and Kaputa (2014) compare the performance of the one-sided Winsorization method developed by Clark (1995) and described by Chambers, Kokic, Smith and Cruddas (2000) to the performance of M-estimation (Beaumont and Alavi 2004) in highly skewed business population data. One aspect of particular interest for methods that detect and treat influential values is the range of values designated as influential, called the detection region. The Clark Winsorization algorithm is easy to implement and can be extremely effective. However, the resultant detection region is highly dependent on the number of influential values in the sample, especially when the survey totals are expected to vary greatly by collection period. In this note, we examine the effect of the number and magnitude of influential values on the detection regions from Clark Winsorization using data simulated to realistically reflect the properties of the population for the Monthly Retail Trade Survey (MRTS) conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. Estimates from the MRTS and other economic surveys are used in economic indicators, such as the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214661
    Description:

    An example presented by Jean-Claude Deville in 2005 is subjected to three estimation methods: the method of moments, the maximum likelihood method, and generalized calibration. The three methods yield exactly the same results for the two non-response models. A discussion follows on how to choose the most appropriate model.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214662
    Description:

    Two-phase sampling designs are often used in surveys when the sampling frame contains little or no auxiliary information. In this note, we shed some light on the concept of invariance, which is often mentioned in the context of two-phase sampling designs. We define two types of invariant two-phase designs: strongly invariant and weakly invariant two-phase designs. Some examples are given. Finally, we describe the implications of strong and weak invariance from an inference point of view.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214664
    Description:

    This paper draws statistical inference for finite population mean based on judgment post stratified (JPS) samples. The JPS sample first selects a simple random sample and then stratifies the selected units into H judgment classes based on their relative positions (ranks) in a small set of size H. This leads to a sample with random sample sizes in judgment classes. Ranking process can be performed either using auxiliary variables or visual inspection to identify the ranks of the measured observations. The paper develops unbiased estimator and constructs confidence interval for population mean. Since judgment ranks are random variables, by conditioning on the measured observations we construct Rao-Blackwellized estimators for the population mean. The paper shows that Rao-Blackwellized estimators perform better than usual JPS estimators. The proposed estimators are applied to 2012 United States Department of Agriculture Census Data.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214677
    Description:

    How do we tell whether weighting adjustments reduce nonresponse bias? If a variable is measured for everyone in the selected sample, then the design weights can be used to calculate an approximately unbiased estimate of the population mean or total for that variable. A second estimate of the population mean or total can be calculated using the survey respondents only, with weights that have been adjusted for nonresponse. If the two estimates disagree, then there is evidence that the weight adjustments may not have removed the nonresponse bias for that variable. In this paper we develop the theoretical properties of linearization and jackknife variance estimators for evaluating the bias of an estimated population mean or total by comparing estimates calculated from overlapping subsets of the same data with different sets of weights, when poststratification or inverse propensity weighting is used for the nonresponse adjustments to the weights. We provide sufficient conditions on the population, sample, and response mechanism for the variance estimators to be consistent, and demonstrate their small-sample properties through a simulation study.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-12-05

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016004
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring the amount and size of firm entry. The paper presents estimates of the importance of firm entry in Canada. It uses the database underlying the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program (LEAP), which has produced measures of firm entry and exit since 1988. This paper discusses the methodology used to estimate entry and exit, the issues that had to be resolved and the reasons for choosing the particular solutions that were adopted. It then presents measures that are derived from LEAP. Finally, it analyzes the sensitivity of the estimates associated with LEAP to alternative methods of estimating entry and exit.

    Release date: 2016-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2016001
    Description:

    Although the record linkage of business data is not a completely new topic, the fact remains that the public and many data users are unaware of the programs and practices commonly used by statistical agencies across the world.

    This report is a brief overview of the main practices, programs and challenges of record linkage of statistical agencies across the world who answered a short survey on this subject supplemented by publically available documentation produced by these agencies. The document shows that the linkage practices are similar between these statistical agencies; however the main differences are in the procedures in place to access to data along with regulatory policies that govern the record linkage permissions and the dissemination of data.

    Release date: 2016-10-27

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016003
    Description:

    Large national mortality cohorts are used to estimate mortality rates for different socioeconomic and population groups, and to conduct research on environmental health. In 2008, Statistics Canada created a cohort linking the 1991 Census to mortality. The present study describes a linkage of the 2001 Census long-form questionnaire respondents aged 19 years and older to the T1 Personal Master File and the Amalgamated Mortality Database. The linkage tracks all deaths over a 10.6-year period (until the end of 2011, to date).

    Release date: 2016-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201601014665
    Description:

    The purpose of this analysis was to use data from the 2007-to-2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey to develop reference equations for maximum, right-hand and left-hand grip strength for Canadians aged 6 to79, based on a healthy, nationally representative population. These equations can be used to determine reference values against which to assess an individual’s grip strength.

    Release date: 2016-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2016007
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at the changes of the Canadian stay-at-home parents since 1976.

    Release date: 2016-09-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-648-X
    Description:

    The documents in this collection are based on data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults, a survey that examines a variety of topics on the well-being of Canadians and measures the effect of changes in certain areas on people's lives. The survey covers several topics, such as jobs, health, adult education and training, income and earnings, as well as the family dynamic. Reports on the survey content, concepts, methodology and data quality are also available.

    Release date: 2016-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2016001
    Description:

    Linkages between survey and administrative data are an increasingly common practice, due in part to the reduced burden to respondents, and to the data that can be obtained at a relatively low cost. Historical linkage, or the linkage of administrative data from previous years to the year of the survey, compounds these benefits by providing additional years of data. This paper examines the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA), which was linked to historical tax data on personal income tax returns (T1) and those collected from employers’ files (T4), among others not mentioned in this paper. It presents trends in historical linkage rates, compares the coherence of administrative data between the T1 and T4, presents the ability to use the data to create balanced panels, and uses the T1 data to produce age-earnings profiles by sex. The results show that the historical linkage rate is high (over 90% in most cases) and stable over time for respondents who are likely to file a tax return, and that the T1 and T4 administrative sources show similar earnings. Moreover, long balanced panels of up to 30 years in length (at the time of writing) can be created using LISA administrative linkage data.

    Release date: 2016-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016002
    Description:

    Immigrants comprise an ever-increasing percentage of the Canadian population—at more than 20%, which is the highest percentage among the G8 countries (Statistics Canada 2013a). This figure is expected to rise to 25% to 28% by 2031, when at least one in four people living in Canada will be foreign-born (Statistics Canada 2010).

    This report summarizes the linkage of the Immigrant Landing File (ILF) for all provinces and territories, excluding Quebec, to hospital data from the Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), a national database containing information about hospital inpatient and day-surgery events. A deterministic exact-matching approach was used to link data from the 1980-to-2006 ILF and from the DAD (2006/2007, 2007/2008 and 2008/2009) with the 2006 Census, which served as a “bridge” file. This was a secondary linkage in that it used linkage keys created in two previous projects (primary linkages) that separately linked the ILF and the DAD to the 2006 Census. The ILF–DAD linked data were validated by means of a representative sample of 2006 Census records containing immigrant information previously linked to the DAD.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Technical products: 75F0002M
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research.

    Release date: 2016-07-08

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2016003
    Description:

    Periodically, income statistics are updated to reflect the most recent population estimates from the Census. Accordingly, with the release of the 2014 data from the Canadian Income Survey, Statistics Canada has revised estimates for 2006 to 2013 using new population totals from the 2011 Census. This paper provides unrevised estimates alongside revised estimates for key income series, indicating where the revisions were significant.

    Release date: 2016-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2016006
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at immigration to Canada since Canada's Confederation.

    Release date: 2016-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016001
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of workers lose their jobs as firms reduce the size of their workforce in response to growing competition, technological changes, changing trade patterns and numerous other factors. Thousands of workers also start a job with a new employer as new firms enter a product market and existing firms expand or replace employees who recently left. This worker reallocation process across employers is generally seen as contributing to productivity growth and rising living standards. To measure this labour reallocation process, labour market indicators such as hiring rates and layoff rates are needed. In response to growing demand for subprovincial labour market information and taking advantage of unique administrative datasets, Statistics Canada is producing hiring rates and layoff rates by economic region of residence. This document describes the data sources, conceptual and methodological issues, and other matters pertaining to these two indicators.

    Release date: 2016-06-27

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Analysis (44)

Analysis (44) (25 of 44 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201601214687
    Description:

    This study describes record linkage of the Canadian Community Health Survey and the Canadian Mortality Database. The article explains the record linkage process and presents results about associations between health behaviours and mortality among a representative sample of Canadians.

    Release date: 2016-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214660
    Description:

    In an economic survey of a sample of enterprises, occupations are randomly selected from a list until a number r of occupations in a local unit has been identified. This is an inverse sampling problem for which we are proposing a few solutions. Simple designs with and without replacement are processed using negative binomial distributions and negative hypergeometric distributions. We also propose estimators for when the units are selected with unequal probabilities, with or without replacement.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214663
    Description:

    We present theoretical evidence that efforts during data collection to balance the survey response with respect to selected auxiliary variables will improve the chances for low nonresponse bias in the estimates that are ultimately produced by calibrated weighting. One of our results shows that the variance of the bias – measured here as the deviation of the calibration estimator from the (unrealized) full-sample unbiased estimator – decreases linearly as a function of the response imbalance that we assume measured and controlled continuously over the data collection period. An attractive prospect is thus a lower risk of bias if one can manage the data collection to get low imbalance. The theoretical results are validated in a simulation study with real data from an Estonian household survey.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214684
    Description:

    This paper introduces an incomplete adaptive cluster sampling design that is easy to implement, controls the sample size well, and does not need to follow the neighbourhood. In this design, an initial sample is first selected, using one of the conventional designs. If a cell satisfies a prespecified condition, a specified radius around the cell is sampled completely. The population mean is estimated using the \pi-estimator. If all the inclusion probabilities are known, then an unbiased \pi estimator is available; if, depending on the situation, the inclusion probabilities are not known for some of the final sample units, then they are estimated. To estimate the inclusion probabilities, a biased estimator is constructed. However, the simulations show that if the sample size is large enough, the error of the inclusion probabilities is negligible, and the relative \pi-estimator is almost unbiased. This design rivals adaptive cluster sampling because it controls the final sample size and is easy to manage. It rivals adaptive two-stage sequential sampling because it considers the cluster form of the population and reduces the cost of moving across the area. Using real data on a bird population and simulations, the paper compares the design with adaptive two-stage sequential sampling. The simulations show that the design has significant efficiency in comparison with its rival.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214676
    Description:

    Winsorization procedures replace extreme values with less extreme values, effectively moving the original extreme values toward the center of the distribution. Winsorization therefore both detects and treats influential values. Mulry, Oliver and Kaputa (2014) compare the performance of the one-sided Winsorization method developed by Clark (1995) and described by Chambers, Kokic, Smith and Cruddas (2000) to the performance of M-estimation (Beaumont and Alavi 2004) in highly skewed business population data. One aspect of particular interest for methods that detect and treat influential values is the range of values designated as influential, called the detection region. The Clark Winsorization algorithm is easy to implement and can be extremely effective. However, the resultant detection region is highly dependent on the number of influential values in the sample, especially when the survey totals are expected to vary greatly by collection period. In this note, we examine the effect of the number and magnitude of influential values on the detection regions from Clark Winsorization using data simulated to realistically reflect the properties of the population for the Monthly Retail Trade Survey (MRTS) conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. Estimates from the MRTS and other economic surveys are used in economic indicators, such as the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214661
    Description:

    An example presented by Jean-Claude Deville in 2005 is subjected to three estimation methods: the method of moments, the maximum likelihood method, and generalized calibration. The three methods yield exactly the same results for the two non-response models. A discussion follows on how to choose the most appropriate model.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214662
    Description:

    Two-phase sampling designs are often used in surveys when the sampling frame contains little or no auxiliary information. In this note, we shed some light on the concept of invariance, which is often mentioned in the context of two-phase sampling designs. We define two types of invariant two-phase designs: strongly invariant and weakly invariant two-phase designs. Some examples are given. Finally, we describe the implications of strong and weak invariance from an inference point of view.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214664
    Description:

    This paper draws statistical inference for finite population mean based on judgment post stratified (JPS) samples. The JPS sample first selects a simple random sample and then stratifies the selected units into H judgment classes based on their relative positions (ranks) in a small set of size H. This leads to a sample with random sample sizes in judgment classes. Ranking process can be performed either using auxiliary variables or visual inspection to identify the ranks of the measured observations. The paper develops unbiased estimator and constructs confidence interval for population mean. Since judgment ranks are random variables, by conditioning on the measured observations we construct Rao-Blackwellized estimators for the population mean. The paper shows that Rao-Blackwellized estimators perform better than usual JPS estimators. The proposed estimators are applied to 2012 United States Department of Agriculture Census Data.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600214677
    Description:

    How do we tell whether weighting adjustments reduce nonresponse bias? If a variable is measured for everyone in the selected sample, then the design weights can be used to calculate an approximately unbiased estimate of the population mean or total for that variable. A second estimate of the population mean or total can be calculated using the survey respondents only, with weights that have been adjusted for nonresponse. If the two estimates disagree, then there is evidence that the weight adjustments may not have removed the nonresponse bias for that variable. In this paper we develop the theoretical properties of linearization and jackknife variance estimators for evaluating the bias of an estimated population mean or total by comparing estimates calculated from overlapping subsets of the same data with different sets of weights, when poststratification or inverse propensity weighting is used for the nonresponse adjustments to the weights. We provide sufficient conditions on the population, sample, and response mechanism for the variance estimators to be consistent, and demonstrate their small-sample properties through a simulation study.

    Release date: 2016-12-20

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-12-05

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016004
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring the amount and size of firm entry. The paper presents estimates of the importance of firm entry in Canada. It uses the database underlying the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program (LEAP), which has produced measures of firm entry and exit since 1988. This paper discusses the methodology used to estimate entry and exit, the issues that had to be resolved and the reasons for choosing the particular solutions that were adopted. It then presents measures that are derived from LEAP. Finally, it analyzes the sensitivity of the estimates associated with LEAP to alternative methods of estimating entry and exit.

    Release date: 2016-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2016001
    Description:

    Although the record linkage of business data is not a completely new topic, the fact remains that the public and many data users are unaware of the programs and practices commonly used by statistical agencies across the world.

    This report is a brief overview of the main practices, programs and challenges of record linkage of statistical agencies across the world who answered a short survey on this subject supplemented by publically available documentation produced by these agencies. The document shows that the linkage practices are similar between these statistical agencies; however the main differences are in the procedures in place to access to data along with regulatory policies that govern the record linkage permissions and the dissemination of data.

    Release date: 2016-10-27

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016003
    Description:

    Large national mortality cohorts are used to estimate mortality rates for different socioeconomic and population groups, and to conduct research on environmental health. In 2008, Statistics Canada created a cohort linking the 1991 Census to mortality. The present study describes a linkage of the 2001 Census long-form questionnaire respondents aged 19 years and older to the T1 Personal Master File and the Amalgamated Mortality Database. The linkage tracks all deaths over a 10.6-year period (until the end of 2011, to date).

    Release date: 2016-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201601014665
    Description:

    The purpose of this analysis was to use data from the 2007-to-2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey to develop reference equations for maximum, right-hand and left-hand grip strength for Canadians aged 6 to79, based on a healthy, nationally representative population. These equations can be used to determine reference values against which to assess an individual’s grip strength.

    Release date: 2016-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2016007
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at the changes of the Canadian stay-at-home parents since 1976.

    Release date: 2016-09-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-648-X
    Description:

    The documents in this collection are based on data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults, a survey that examines a variety of topics on the well-being of Canadians and measures the effect of changes in certain areas on people's lives. The survey covers several topics, such as jobs, health, adult education and training, income and earnings, as well as the family dynamic. Reports on the survey content, concepts, methodology and data quality are also available.

    Release date: 2016-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2016001
    Description:

    Linkages between survey and administrative data are an increasingly common practice, due in part to the reduced burden to respondents, and to the data that can be obtained at a relatively low cost. Historical linkage, or the linkage of administrative data from previous years to the year of the survey, compounds these benefits by providing additional years of data. This paper examines the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA), which was linked to historical tax data on personal income tax returns (T1) and those collected from employers’ files (T4), among others not mentioned in this paper. It presents trends in historical linkage rates, compares the coherence of administrative data between the T1 and T4, presents the ability to use the data to create balanced panels, and uses the T1 data to produce age-earnings profiles by sex. The results show that the historical linkage rate is high (over 90% in most cases) and stable over time for respondents who are likely to file a tax return, and that the T1 and T4 administrative sources show similar earnings. Moreover, long balanced panels of up to 30 years in length (at the time of writing) can be created using LISA administrative linkage data.

    Release date: 2016-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016002
    Description:

    Immigrants comprise an ever-increasing percentage of the Canadian population—at more than 20%, which is the highest percentage among the G8 countries (Statistics Canada 2013a). This figure is expected to rise to 25% to 28% by 2031, when at least one in four people living in Canada will be foreign-born (Statistics Canada 2010).

    This report summarizes the linkage of the Immigrant Landing File (ILF) for all provinces and territories, excluding Quebec, to hospital data from the Discharge Abstract Database (DAD), a national database containing information about hospital inpatient and day-surgery events. A deterministic exact-matching approach was used to link data from the 1980-to-2006 ILF and from the DAD (2006/2007, 2007/2008 and 2008/2009) with the 2006 Census, which served as a “bridge” file. This was a secondary linkage in that it used linkage keys created in two previous projects (primary linkages) that separately linked the ILF and the DAD to the 2006 Census. The ILF–DAD linked data were validated by means of a representative sample of 2006 Census records containing immigrant information previously linked to the DAD.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2016006
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at immigration to Canada since Canada's Confederation.

    Release date: 2016-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016001
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of workers lose their jobs as firms reduce the size of their workforce in response to growing competition, technological changes, changing trade patterns and numerous other factors. Thousands of workers also start a job with a new employer as new firms enter a product market and existing firms expand or replace employees who recently left. This worker reallocation process across employers is generally seen as contributing to productivity growth and rising living standards. To measure this labour reallocation process, labour market indicators such as hiring rates and layoff rates are needed. In response to growing demand for subprovincial labour market information and taking advantage of unique administrative datasets, Statistics Canada is producing hiring rates and layoff rates by economic region of residence. This document describes the data sources, conceptual and methodological issues, and other matters pertaining to these two indicators.

    Release date: 2016-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600114540
    Description:

    In this paper, we compare the EBLUP and pseudo-EBLUP estimators for small area estimation under the nested error regression model and three area level model-based estimators using the Fay-Herriot model. We conduct a design-based simulation study to compare the model-based estimators for unit level and area level models under informative and non-informative sampling. In particular, we are interested in the confidence interval coverage rate of the unit level and area level estimators. We also compare the estimators if the model has been misspecified. Our simulation results show that estimators based on the unit level model perform better than those based on the area level. The pseudo-EBLUP estimator is the best among unit level and area level estimators.

    Release date: 2016-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600114544
    Description:

    In the Netherlands, statistical information about income and wealth is based on two large scale household panels that are completely derived from administrative data. A problem with using households as sampling units in the sample design of panels is the instability of these units over time. Changes in the household composition affect the inclusion probabilities required for design-based and model-assisted inference procedures. Such problems are circumvented in the two aforementioned household panels by sampling persons, who are followed over time. At each period the household members of these sampled persons are included in the sample. This is equivalent to sampling with probabilities proportional to household size where households can be selected more than once but with a maximum equal to the number of household members. In this paper properties of this sample design are described and contrasted with the Generalized Weight Share method for indirect sampling (Lavallée 1995, 2007). Methods are illustrated with an application to the Dutch Regional Income Survey.

    Release date: 2016-06-22

Reference (56)

Reference (56) (25 of 56 results)

  • Technical products: 75F0002M
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research.

    Release date: 2016-07-08

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2016003
    Description:

    Periodically, income statistics are updated to reflect the most recent population estimates from the Census. Accordingly, with the release of the 2014 data from the Canadian Income Survey, Statistics Canada has revised estimates for 2006 to 2013 using new population totals from the 2011 Census. This paper provides unrevised estimates alongside revised estimates for key income series, indicating where the revisions were significant.

    Release date: 2016-07-08

  • Technical products: 11-522-X
    Description:

    Since 1984, an annual international symposium on methodological issues has been sponsored by Statistics Canada. Proceedings have been available since 1987.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014718
    Description:

    This study assessed whether starting participation in Employment Assistance Services (EAS) earlier after initiating an Employment Insurance (EI) claim leads to better impacts for unemployed individuals than participating later during the EI benefit period. As in Sianesi (2004) and Hujer and Thomsen (2010), the analysis relied on a stratified propensity score matching approach conditional on the discretized duration of unemployment until the program starts. The results showed that individuals who participated in EAS within the first four weeks after initiating an EI claim had the best impacts on earnings and incidence of employment while also experiencing reduced use of EI starting the second year post-program.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014750
    Description:

    The Educational Master File (EMF) system was built to allow the analysis of educational programs in Canada. At the core of the system are administrative files that record all of the registrations to post-secondary and apprenticeship programs in Canada. New administrative files become available on an annual basis. Once a new file becomes available, a first round of processing is performed, which includes linkage to other administrative records. This linkage yields information that can improve the quality of the file, it allows further linkages to other data describing labour market outcomes, and it’s the first step in adding the file to the EMF. Once part of the EMF, information from the file can be included in cross-sectional and longitudinal projects, to study academic pathways and labour market outcomes after graduation. The EMF currently consists of data from 2005 to 2013, but it evolves as new data become available. This paper gives an overview of the mechanisms used to build the EMF, with focus on the structure of the final system and some of its analytical potential.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014727
    Description:

    "Probability samples of near-universal frames of households and persons, administered standardized measures, yielding long multivariate data records, and analyzed with statistical procedures reflecting the design – these have been the cornerstones of the empirical social sciences for 75 years. That measurement structure have given the developed world almost all of what we know about our societies and their economies. The stored survey data form a unique historical record. We live now in a different data world than that in which the leadership of statistical agencies and the social sciences were raised. High-dimensional data are ubiquitously being produced from Internet search activities, mobile Internet devices, social media, sensors, retail store scanners, and other devices. Some estimate that these data sources are increasing in size at the rate of 40% per year. Together their sizes swamp that of the probability-based sample surveys. Further, the state of sample surveys in the developed world is not healthy. Falling rates of survey participation are linked with ever-inflated costs of data collection. Despite growing needs for information, the creation of new survey vehicles is hampered by strained budgets for official statistical agencies and social science funders. These combined observations are unprecedented challenges for the basic paradigm of inference in the social and economic sciences. This paper discusses alternative ways forward at this moment in history. "

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014734
    Description:

    Data protection and privacy are key challenges that need to be tackled with high priority in order to enable the use of Big Data in the production of Official Statistics. This was emphasized in 2013 by the Directors of National Statistical Insitutes (NSIs) of the European Statistical System Committee (ESSC) in the Scheveningen Memorandum. The ESSC requested Eurostat and the NSIs to elaborate an action plan with a roadmap for following up the implementation of the Memorandum. At the Riga meeting on September 26, 2014, the ESSC endorsed the Big Data Action Plan and Roadmap 1.0 (BDAR) presented by the Eurostat Task Force on Big Data (TFBD) and agreed to integrate it into the ESS Vision 2020 portfolio. Eurostat also collaborates in this field with external partners such as the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE). The big data project of the UNECE High-Level Group is an international project on the role of big data in the modernization of statistical production. It comprised four ‘task teams’ addressing different aspects of Big Data issues relevant for official statistics: Privacy, Partnerships, Sandbox, and Quality. The Privacy Task Team finished its work in 2014 and gave an overview of the existing tools for risk management regarding privacy issues, described how risk of identification relates to Big Data characteristics and drafted recommendations for National Statistical Offices (NSOs). It mainly concluded that extensions to existing frameworks, including use of new technologies were needed in order to deal with privacy risks related to the use of Big Data. The BDAR builds on the work achieved by the UNECE task teams. Specifically, it recognizes that a number of big data sources contain sensitive information, that their use for official statistics may induce negative perceptions with the general public and other stakeholders and that this risk should be mitigated in the short to medium term. It proposes to launch multiple actions like e.g., an adequate review on ethical principles governing the roles and activities of the NSIs and a strong communication strategy. The paper presents the different actions undertaken within the ESS and in collaboration with UNECE, as well as potential technical and legal solutions to be put in place in order to address the data protection and privacy risks in the use of Big Data for Official Statistics.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014747
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB) combines the Immigrant Landing File (ILF) with annual tax files. This record linkage is performed using a tax filer database. The ILF includes all immigrants who have landed in Canada since 1980. In looking to enhance the IMDB, the possibility of adding temporary residents (TR) and immigrants who landed between 1952 and 1979 (PRE80) was studied. Adding this information would give a more complete picture of the immigrant population living in Canada. To integrate the TR and PRE80 files into the IMDB, record linkages between these two files and the tax filer database, were performed. This exercise was challenging in part due to the presence of duplicates in the files and conflicting links between the different record linkages.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014709
    Description:

    Traffic congestion is not limited to large cities but is also becoming a problem in medium-size cities and to roads going through cities. Among a large variety of congestion measures, six were selected for the ease of aggregation and their capacity to use the instantaneous information from CVUS-light component in 2014. From the selected measures, the Index of Congestion is potentially the only one not biased. This measure is used to illustrate different dimension of congestion on the road network.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014711
    Description:

    After the 2010 Census, the U.S. Census Bureau conducted two separate research projects matching survey data to databases. One study matched to the third-party database Accurint, and the other matched to U.S. Postal Service National Change of Address (NCOA) files. In both projects, we evaluated response error in reported move dates by comparing the self-reported move date to records in the database. We encountered similar challenges in the two projects. This paper discusses our experience using “big data” as a comparison source for survey data and our lessons learned for future projects similar to the ones we conducted.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014757
    Description:

    The Unified Brazilian Health System (SUS) was created in 1988 and, with the aim of organizing the health information systems and databases already in use, a unified databank (DataSUS) was created in 1991. DataSUS files are freely available via Internet. Access and visualization of such data is done through a limited number of customized tables and simple diagrams, which do not entirely meet the needs of health managers and other users for a flexible and easy-to-use tool that can tackle different aspects of health which are relevant to their purposes of knowledge-seeking and decision-making. We propose the interactive monthly generation of synthetic epidemiological reports, which are not only easily accessible but also easy to interpret and understand. Emphasis is put on data visualization through more informative diagrams and maps.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014731
    Description:

    Our study describes various factors that are of concern when evaluating disclosure risk of contextualized microdata and some of the empirical steps that are involved in their assessment. Utilizing synthetic sets of survey respondents, we illustrate how different postulates shape the assessment of risk when considering: (1) estimated probabilities that unidentified geographic areas are represented within a survey; (2) the number of people in the population who share the same personal and contextual identifiers as a respondent; and (3) the anticipated amount of coverage error in census population counts and extant files that provide identifying information (like names and addresses).

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014745
    Description:

    In the design of surveys a number of parameters like contact propensities, participation propensities and costs per sample unit play a decisive role. In on-going surveys, these survey design parameters are usually estimated from previous experience and updated gradually with new experience. In new surveys, these parameters are estimated from expert opinion and experience with similar surveys. Although survey institutes have a fair expertise and experience, the postulation, estimation and updating of survey design parameters is rarely done in a systematic way. This paper presents a Bayesian framework to include and update prior knowledge and expert opinion about the parameters. This framework is set in the context of adaptive survey designs in which different population units may receive different treatment given quality and cost objectives. For this type of survey, the accuracy of design parameters becomes even more crucial to effective design decisions. The framework allows for a Bayesian analysis of the performance of a survey during data collection and in between waves of a survey. We demonstrate the Bayesian analysis using a realistic simulation study.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014722
    Description:

    The U.S. Census Bureau is researching ways to incorporate administrative data in decennial census and survey operations. Critical to this work is an understanding of the coverage of the population by administrative records. Using federal and third party administrative data linked to the American Community Survey (ACS), we evaluate the extent to which administrative records provide data on foreign-born individuals in the ACS and employ multinomial logistic regression techniques to evaluate characteristics of those who are in administrative records relative to those who are not. We find that overall, administrative records provide high coverage of foreign-born individuals in our sample for whom a match can be determined. The odds of being in administrative records are found to be tied to the processes of immigrant assimilation – naturalization, higher English proficiency, educational attainment, and full-time employment are associated with greater odds of being in administrative records. These findings suggest that as immigrants adapt and integrate into U.S. society, they are more likely to be involved in government and commercial processes and programs for which we are including data. We further explore administrative records coverage for the two largest race/ethnic groups in our sample – Hispanic and non-Hispanic single-race Asian foreign born, finding again that characteristics related to assimilation are associated with administrative records coverage for both groups. However, we observe that neighborhood context impacts Hispanics and Asians differently.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014735
    Description:

    Microdata dissemination normally requires data reduction and modification methods be applied, and the degree to which these methods are applied depend on the control methods that will be required to access and use the data. An approach that is in some circumstances more suitable for accessing data for statistical purposes is secure computation, which involves computing analytic functions on encrypted data without the need to decrypt the underlying source data to run a statistical analysis. This approach also allows multiple sites to contribute data while providing strong privacy guarantees. This way the data can be pooled and contributors can compute analytic functions without either party knowing their inputs. We explain how secure computation can be applied in practical contexts, with some theoretical results and real healthcare examples.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014726
    Description:

    Internal migration is one of the components of population growth estimated at Statistics Canada. It is estimated by comparing individuals’ addresses at the beginning and end of a given period. The Canada Child Tax Benefit and T1 Family File are the primary data sources used. Address quality and coverage of more mobile subpopulations are crucial to producing high-quality estimates. The purpose of this article is to present the results of evaluations of these elements using access to more tax data sources at Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014751
    Description:

    Practically all major retailers use scanners to record the information on their transactions with clients (consumers). These data normally include the product code, a brief description, the price and the quantity sold. This is an extremely relevant data source for statistical programs such as Statistics Canada’s Consumer Price Index (CPI), one of Canada’s most important economic indicators. Using scanner data could improve the quality of the CPI by increasing the number of prices used in calculations, expanding geographic coverage and including the quantities sold, among other things, while lowering data collection costs. However, using these data presents many challenges. An examination of scanner data from a first retailer revealed a high rate of change in product identification codes over a one-year period. The effects of these changes pose challenges from a product classification and estimate quality perspective. This article focuses on the issues associated with acquiring, classifying and examining these data to assess their quality for use in the CPI.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014716
    Description:

    Administrative data, depending on its source and original purpose, can be considered a more reliable source of information than survey-collected data. It does not require a respondent to be present and understand question wording, and it is not limited by the respondent’s ability to recall events retrospectively. This paper compares selected survey data, such as demographic variables, from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) to various administrative sources for which LISA has linkage agreements in place. The agreement between data sources, and some factors that might affect it, are analyzed for various aspects of the survey.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014728
    Description:

    Record linkage joins together two or more sources. The product of record linkage is a file with one record per individual containing all the information about the individual from the multiple files. The problem is difficult when a unique identification key is not available, there are errors in some variables, some data are missing, and files are large. Probabilistic record linkage computes a probability that records from on different files pertain to a single individual. Some true links are given low probabilities of matching, whereas some non links are given high probabilities. Errors in linkage designations can cause bias in analyses based on the composite data base. The SEER cancer registries contain information on breast cancer cases in their registry areas. A diagnostic test based on the Oncotype DX assay, performed by Genomic Health, Inc. (GHI), is often performed for certain types of breast cancers. Record linkage using personal identifiable information was conducted to associate Oncotype DC assay results with SEER cancer registry information. The software Link Plus was used to generate a score describing the similarity of records and to identify the apparent best match of SEER cancer registry individuals to the GHI database. Clerical review was used to check samples of likely matches, possible matches, and unlikely matches. Models are proposed for jointly modeling the record linkage process and subsequent statistical analysis in this and other applications.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014704
    Description:

    We identify several research areas and topics for methodological research in official statistics. We argue why these are important, and why these are the most important ones for official statistics. We describe the main topics in these research areas and sketch what seems to be the most promising ways to address them. Here we focus on: (i) Quality of National accounts, in particular the rate of growth of GNI (ii) Big data, in particular how to create representative estimates and how to make the most of big data when this is difficult or impossible. We also touch upon: (i) Increasing timeliness of preliminary and final statistical estimates (ii) Statistical analysis, in particular of complex and coherent phenomena. These topics are elements in the present Strategic Methodological Research Program that has recently been adopted at Statistics Netherlands

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014740
    Description:

    In this paper, we discuss the impacts of Employment Benefit and Support Measures delivered in Canada under the Labour Market Development Agreements. We use linked rich longitudinal administrative data covering all LMDA participants from 2002 to 2005. We Apply propensity score matching as in Blundell et al. (2002), Gerfin and Lechner (2002), and Sianesi (2004), and produced the national incremental impact estimates using difference-in-differences and Kernel Matching estimator (Heckman and Smith, 1999). The findings suggest that, both Employment Assistance Services and employment benefit such as Skills Development and Targeted Wage Subsidies had positive effects on earnings and employment.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014743
    Description:

    Probabilistic linkage is susceptible to linkage errors such as false positives and false negatives. In many cases, these errors may be reliably measured through clerical-reviews, i.e. the visual inspection of a sample of record pairs to determine if they are matched. A framework is described to effectively carry-out such clerical-reviews based on a probabilistic sample of pairs, repeated independent reviews of the same pairs and latent class analysis to account for clerical errors.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014717
    Description:

    Files with linked data from the Statistics Canada, Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS) and tax data can be used to examine the trajectories of students who pursue postsecondary education (PSE) programs and their post-schooling labour market outcomes. On one hand, administrative data on students linked longitudinally can provide aggregate information on student pathways during postsecondary studies such as persistence rates, graduation rates, mobility, etc. On the other hand, the tax data could supplement the PSIS data to provide information on employment outcomes such as average and median earnings or earnings progress by employment sector (industry), field of study, education level and/or other demographic information, year over year after graduation. Two longitudinal pilot studies have been done using administrative data on postsecondary students of Maritimes institutions which have been longitudinally linked and linked to Statistics Canada Ttx data (the T1 Family File) for relevant years. This article first focuses on the quality of information in the administrative data and the methodology used to conduct these longitudinal studies and derive indicators. Second, it will focus on some limitations when using administrative data, rather than a survey, to define some concepts.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014733
    Description:

    The social value of data collections are dramatically enhanced by the broad dissemination of research files and the resulting increase in scientific productivity. Currently, most studies are designed with a focus on collecting information that is analytically useful and accurate, with little forethought as to how it will be shared. Both literature and practice also presume that disclosure analysis will take place after data collection. But to produce public-use data of the highest analytical utility for the largest user group, disclosure risk must be considered at the beginning of the research process. Drawing upon economic and statistical decision-theoretic frameworks and survey methodology research, this study seeks to enhance the scientific productivity of shared research data by describing how disclosure risk can be addressed in the earliest stages of research with the formulation of "safe designs" and "disclosure simulations", where an applied statistical approach has been taken in: (1) developing and validating models that predict the composition of survey data under different sampling designs; (2) selecting and/or developing measures and methods used in the assessments of disclosure risk, analytical utility, and disclosure survey costs that are best suited for evaluating sampling and database designs; and (3) conducting simulations to gather estimates of risk, utility, and cost for studies with a wide range of sampling and database design characteristics.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Technical products: 11-522-X201700014713
    Description:

    Big data is a term that means different things to different people. To some, it means datasets so large that our traditional processing and analytic systems can no longer accommodate them. To others, it simply means taking advantage of existing datasets of all sizes and finding ways to merge them with the goal of generating new insights. The former view poses a number of important challenges to traditional market, opinion, and social research. In either case, there are implications for the future of surveys that are only beginning to be explored.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

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