Conclusion

The Canadian CSA will allow governments, stakeholders, professional organizations, and industry who use culture statistics to understand how economic issues impact growth in the culture sector, as well as its economic value.

The CSA 2010 has shown that culture and sport play a significant role in the Canadian economy, in terms of output, GDP and jobs. Culture contributed 3.1% ($47.8 billion) to Canada's GDP, while sport contributed 0.3% ($4.5 billion). The culture industry contributed more to the Canadian economy than industries such as Accommodation, Utilities and Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting.

The CSA, through the domain perspective, revealed that culture products originate from several non-culture industries, a nuance which would have been missed if using the industry perspective alone. This emphasizes the importance of utilizing both perspectives in understanding the role that culture and sport play in Canada.

Over the next few years, as the CSA will be produced on an recurrent basis, users will be able to get an understanding of how economic activity in the culture and sport sector in Canada changes over time.

The production of the Canadian Culture Satellite Account is the first step in understanding and measuring the importance of culture and sport in Canada. The development of provincial and territorial estimates (reference year 2010) and indicators (reference years 2009 to 2013), are the next steps in the evolution of the CSA. Work on both of these initiatives has already begun with results expected in the near future.

 

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