Data quality, concepts and methodology: Explanatory notes on direct program payments to producers

Payments Enhancing Receipts

Agricultural Disaster Insurance Program (ADIP) (1996 to 2000)

The Agricultural Disaster Insurance Program was designed to provide individual farm operations in Prince Edward Island relief from financial losses caused by disastrous changes in commodity prices, rising input costs, and/or unpredictable production losses. The program calculates an annual program margin defined in general as the difference between all commodity sales and most operating expenses (except wages, interest, rent, property taxes, and depreciation). If the current year's margin falls below 70% of the average of the previous three years' program margin, the farm may be eligible for a payment. The farm is eligible for a payment if the drop in the program margin is attributed to a decrease in commodity sale prices per unit; and/or an increase in farm input costs per unit; and/or a loss in productivity (i.e., crop destroyed, animal diseases, etc.).

Agricultural Income Disaster Assistance (AIDA) Program (1999 to 2004)

The Agricultural Income Disaster Assistance (AIDA) program was designed to provide assistance to producers facing dramatic income declines in 1998 and 1999 as a result of factors beyond their control and for which existing programs could not provide assurance of continuing the farm business. Funded 60% by the federal government and 40% by provincial governments, AIDA is available to anyone in Canada who files income tax returns as a farmer, and whose gross margin has dropped below 70% of their average gross margin over the previous three years. For beginning farmers, a special calculation is used to determine eligibility.

The AIDA program provides individual payments to eligible producers and credits to the provincial governments for programs already established to assist producers. The provincial programs (this list is not exhaustive) that are partly funded by the AIDA program are:

  1. Agricultural Disaster Insurance Program (ADIP), Prince Edward Island;
  2. Assurance stabilisation du revenu agricole (ASRA), Québec
  3. Ontario Whole Farm Relief Program (OWFRP), Ontario
  4. Farm Income Disaster Program (FIDP), Alberta
  5. B.C. Whole Farm Insurance Program (BCWFIP), British Columbia.

Agricultural Revenue Stabilization Account (2002 to present)

The Agricultural Revenue Stabilization Account program is an individual farm income protection program. It was designed to manage the fluctuations in farming income according to individual producers needs.

AgriInvest (2008 to present)

This program, as part of the 2008 Agriculture Policy Framework, replaces the coverage under the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) program for margin losses of 15 per cent or less. Through government and farmer contributions to producer accounts, it will provide producers with flexible coverage for small income declines as well as support for investments to mitigate risks or improve market income.

AgriRecovery (2008 to present)

AgriRecovery was designed to provide quick targeted assistance to producers in case of natural disasters. Federal and provincial governments jointly determine whether further assistance beyond existing programs already in place is necessary and what form of assistance should be provided. Funded 60% by the federal government and 40% by provincial governments, AgriRecovery is available to producers once provincial and federal governments agree that assistance is warranted. The assistance provided will be unique to the specific disaster situation and most of the time, unique to a province or even a region. Examples of programs included in Agri-Recovery are the 'Excess Moisture program' (available in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta) as well as the Pasture Recovery Program (available in Saskatchewan and Alberta). A number of additional programs are also included.

AgriStability (2007 to present)

As part of the "Growing Forward" initiative, enacted in 2007, AgriStability is a margin-based program that provides income support when a producer experiences larger income losses. AgriStability has replaced the coverage currently provided under CAIS for income declines of more than 15%.

Agri-Québec (2011 to present)

Agri-Québec is a self-directed risk management program offered to all farming and aqua-farming operations in Quebec. The program allows participants to deposit an amount in an account under their name, in order to receive matching contributions from La Financière agricole du Québec. Participants can then withdraw the funds from the accounts, based on their operational needs. Agri-Québec is managed jointly by the provincial and federal governments, as it is similar and complimentary to AgriInvest.

"Aide aux exploitations ovines affectées par la tremblante" (2000)

This program offers financial assistance to Quebec sheep producers who had to eliminate part of their herd between January 1, 1997 and October 27, 1998. These slaughters were made as part of control measures administered by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency to combat scrapie. This program is funded entirely by the Government of Quebec.

Alberta BSE Slaughter Market Adjustment Program (2004 to 2005)

The Alberta BSE Slaughter Market Adjustment Program for Other Ruminants is very similar to the Canada-Alberta BSE Recovery Program. Producers who sold their animals for slaughter were entitled to compensation on a sliding scale equal to the difference between a base price and an average weekly market price.

Alberta Farm Income Assistance Program (AFIAP) (2000 to 2004)

The Alberta Farm Income Assistance Program (AFIAP) provides Alberta producers (who were farming as of December 31, 1999) with an agricultural assistance package designed to supplement declining farm income due to extreme weather conditions, continuous low commodity prices, and growing input costs. This payment provides qualifying farmers with $10.29 per acre for all cultivated acres, and $3.00 per acre on native pasture.

Alberta Farm Income Assistance Program 2002 (2002-2004 and 2006)

The Alberta Farm Income Assistance Program - 2002 provided an acreage based payment to producers suffering from adverse weather conditions, low income and pest problems in 2002.

Alberta Fed Cattle Competitive Bid program (2003 to 2006)

This program was designed to temporarily reduce the inventory of steers and heifers available for slaughter with the effect of increasing producers' cash flows and market price. This was achieved by setting aside animals from the slaughter queue for a minimum 8-week period and compensating producers for the market deficiencies.

Alberta Mature Animal Market Transition Program (2004 to 2006)

This program is designed to help producers deal with mature cows, bulls and other ruminants while the industry moves towards new market realities in response to the issue of BSE.

Alberta Steer and Heifer Market Transition Program (2004 to 2006)

The Alberta Steer and Heifer Market Transition Program, provided producers with compensation for slaughter weight steers and heifers on a market differential basis.

Alberta Winter Feed Program (2003 to 2005)

This program assisted producers to adequately care for their livestock over the winter months.

Aleutian Disease Management Program (2008)

This provincially funded program for 2008, is to help mink farmers to manage and guard against Aleutian Disease, to implement enhanced biosecurity measures on farms, dispose of carcasses, and to disinfect and replace diseased animals.

Assiniboine Valley Producers Flood Assistance Program (AVPFAP) (2007 to present)

This Province of Manitoba program provides financial assistance for Assiniboine Valley agricultural producers who experienced crop loss or the inability to seed a crop in 2005 and 2006 along the Assiniboine River from the Shellmouth Dam to Brandon, MB due to flooding.

Assistance to Feedlot Operators (1988 to 1989)

Feedlot operators in British Columbia received payments on a per animal fed basis, to encourage the feeding of more cattle for slaughter in the province.

B.C. Whole Farm Insurance Program (WFIP) (1998 to 2004)

The Whole Farm Insurance Program is a voluntary program instituted in 1997 for British Colombia farmers. The objective is to reduce extreme income reductions that are beyond the farmer's control. Eligible farmers may apply for a claim when their current year program margin falls below 70% of their reference margin.

Beef Cattle and Sheep Support Program (1982)

Under the Beef Cattle and Sheep Support Program, payments were made to Alberta producers in 1982 for bred cows and heifers on inventory as well as feeders, slaughter cattle and lambs sold.

Beef Cattle Assistance Program (1981 to 1982)

Under the Beef Cattle Assistance Program for Slaughter Animals, payments were made to Ontario producers for cattle sold for slaughter in 1980. Payments were also made to cow-calf operators based on bred beef cow and heifer inventories at August 1, 1981.

Beef Cow-Calf Assistance (1985 to 1995)

Under the Beef Cow-Calf Assistance Program, payments are provided to Prince Edward Island livestock producers as an incentive for following certain management practices aimed at improving the quality of beef calves.

Beef Enhancement Program (1982 to 1986)

Under the Beef Stabilization Plan, productivity enhancement grants were provided to Manitoba producers. These grants were paid on a per cow basis over the 1982 to 1986 period to encourage cattle production.

Beef Performance Program (1998 to 2000)

The Beef Performance Program was designed to encourage Nova Scotia beef producers to stabilize farm income by participating in Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA) program. It is exclusively a provincial initiative of the Nova Scotia government. Beef producers who meet the eligibility requirements may choose to receive program payments under Option A – NISA Based Performance Program or Option B – Beef Gross Margin Performance Program.

Included in the Direct Program Payments (DPP) series are the second payment under Option A and the first and second payments under Option B. The first payment under Option A was not accounted as Direct Program Payments since beef producers have to deposit it in their NISA account.

Beef Quality Incentive Program (2000 to 2001)

The Beef Quality Incentive is part of a comprehensive program designed to encourage the marketing of finished beef cattle that meet the specifications of the "Atlantic Tender Beef Classic" branded beef program. The incentive of $0.03 per pound, based on carcass weight is available to Prince Edward Island producers who are enrolled in the "Atlantic Tender Beef Classic" branded beef program.

Beef Quality Marketing Initiative (2000 to 2001)

The Beef Quality Marketing Initiative is part of a comprehensive program designed to encourage the marketing of finished beef cattle that meet the specifications of the "Atlantic Tender Beef Classic" branded beef program. The incentive of $0.03 per pound, based on carcass weight is available to New Brunswick producers who are enrolled in the "Atlantic Tender Beef Classic" branded beef program.

Beef Transportation Assistance Program (2003)

This program was designed to assist producers with additional transportation expenses incurred when transporting "Atlantic Tender Beef Classic" (ATBC) branded beef cattle. An incentive of $0.015 per pound on a carcass weight basis was paid for finished cattle that complied with the ATBC criteria.

Beehive Production Losses (1986)

Under the Beekeepers' Assistance Program, registered beekeepers in Alberta were provided with payments on a per hive basis in recognition of production losses experienced as a result of the 1985 drought and other weather related conditions.

Big Game Damage Compensation Program (1997 to 1998)

Announced in the fall of 1996, this program enables producers in Saskatchewan to receive certain compensation for commercial crop losses and damage to haystacks caused by big game animals such as white-tailed deer, mule deer, antelope, elk, bear and moose.

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Recovery Program (2003 to 2006)

This program was designed to help offset the impact of border closures following the discovery of a single cow with BSE in Alberta. The Assistance Package was cost shared by the federal government and participating provinces on a 60:40 basis.

British Columbia Steer and Heifer Market Transition Program (2004)

The British Columbia Steer and Heifer Market Transition Program was designed to help farmers offset some of the loss due to their inability to sell the many pre-BSE animals that were still in feedlots and it helped those farmers who sold slaughter-weight animals since the BSE recovery program ended on September 1, 2003.

CAIS Inventory Transition Initiative (CITI) (2006 to 2007)

CITI is a one time federal government injection of $900 million into Canada's Agriculture and Agri-food industry. The funds will be delivered to producers by recalculating how the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) program values inventory change for the 2003, 2004, and 2005 CAIS program years.

CAIS Ontario Inventory Transition Payment (OITP) (2006 to present)

The Ontario Inventory Transition Payment (OITP) is an additional one-time funding from the province of Ontario for CAIS participants as it transitions to a new method of valuing inventory for CAIS.

Canada-Alberta Farm Income Assistance Program (CAFIAP) (2001 to 2005)

The Canada-Alberta Farm Income Assistance Program is designed to supplement farm income in Alberta for the year 2000.

Canada-British Columbia Assistance Program (2001)

The Canada-British Columbia Assistance Program is a general payment program targeting income loss due to damage in 14 commodity groups.

Canada-Manitoba Adjustment Program (2000 to 2001)

The Canada-Manitoba Adjustment Program provides producers of grains, oilseed and special crops with a one-time payment to assist them as they complete the adjustment from the elimination of transportation subsidies during a period of low prices. Program payments are based on the greater of a producer's: 1998 qualifying sales or average qualifying sales from 1994 to 1998. Producers who started farming in 1999 had their payment based on their 1999 qualifying sales. Assistance under this program is cost shared by the Government of Canada and the Government of Manitoba.

Canada-Manitoba Adjustment Program 2 (2001 to 2002)

The Canada-Manitoba Adjustment Program 2 is designed to aid Manitoba farmers competing in the grains, oilseed and speciality crops sectors, as producers in these sectors are faced with making adjustments to compete in the global market with international competitors that receive significantly higher support.

Canada-New Brunswick Farm Assistance Program (2002)

The Canada-New Brunswick Farm Assistance Program was designed to provide contributions to producers in New Brunswick for economic hardships experienced in 2000.

Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Forage Companion Program (2002)

The Forage Companion Program was designed to provide financial assistance to Newfoundland and Labrador livestock and forage producers who experienced financial hardship due to poor forage production in 2001.

Canada-Ontario Edible Horticulture Payment (2001)

The Canada-Ontario Edible Horticulture Payment provides funding to help offset the income losses experienced in 2000 due to a combination of inclement weather and severely depressed commodity prices.

Canada – Ontario General Top-Up Program (2005 to 2007)

This is a special top-up payment program which provides whole farm coverage to CAIS participants, who are automatically enrolled. All commodities eligible for CAIS payment are covered under this program. In order to qualify, participants must have experienced a decline in their program year production margin as calculated by the CAIS program Administrator and be eligible to receive the government portion of the CAIS payment. The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs are responsible for the overall administration of the program.

Canada-Ontario Grain and Oilseed Payment (2001)

The Canada-Ontario Grain and Oilseed Payment provides funding to help offset the income losses experienced in 2000 due to a combination of inclement weather and severely depressed commodity prices.

Canada-Ontario Market Revenue Insurance Program (1997 to 2003)

The Market Revenue Insurance Program provides farmers with protection from low commodity prices. Payments are made when the average annual Ontario price for the current crop falls below the support price, which is calculated using 85 per cent of the 15-year moving average price. The program is jointly funded by the provincial and federal governments. Payouts received by the producers are reduced by one-third in lieu of a producer premium.

Canada-Saskatchewan Adjustment Program (2000 to 2002)

The Canada-Saskatchewan Adjustment Program provides producers of grains, oilseed and special crops with a one-time payment to assist them as they complete the adjustment from the elimination of transportation subsidies during a period of low prices.

Program payments are based on the greater of a producer's: 1998 qualifying sales or average qualifying sales from 1994 to 1998. Producers who started farming in 1999 had their payment based on their 1999 qualifying sales. Assistance under this program is cost shared by the Government of Canada and the Government of Saskatchewan.

Canada-Saskatchewan Assistance Program (C-SAP II) (2001 to 2002)

The Canada-Saskatchewan Assistance Program II focuses on grains, oilseeds and speciality crops producers to assist them in dealing with income problems. Payments are made to producers based on a percentage of their qualifying sales of grains, oilseeds and speciality crops.

Canada-Saskatchewan 1999 Unseeded Acreage Benefit (1999 to 2001)

This program compensates producers who did not participate in the 1999 Canada-Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Program for losses incurred due to excessive moisture conditions experienced in the spring of 1999. A compensation payment of $25 per acre was paid to eligible producers who were unable to seed on or before the 1999 seeding deadline established for crop insurance. Canada and Saskatchewan shared the cost of this program on a 60:40 basis.

Note that an unseeded acreage benefit of up to $25 per unseeded acre was available to crop insurance customers under the basic crop insurance program. Details of the payment calculation were the same for insured and non-insured producers.

Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) (2004 to 2008)

The CAIS program is available to producers across Canada and provides assistance to those producers who have experienced a loss of income as a result of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) or other factors. The program integrates stabilization and disaster protection into a single program, helping producers protect their farming operations from both small and large drops in income.

Canadian Farm Income Program (CFIP) (2001 to 2005)

The Canadian Farm Income Program is a three-year program covering the 2000, 2001, and 2002 claim years. CFIP provides funds to producers who have had a sudden and severe drop in income for reasons beyond their control such as flooding, disease, price collapse, or rapidly rising input costs. To be eligible for a CFIP payment, a producer must have completed a production cycle. A production cycle can be the growing and harvesting of a crop, the process of rearing livestock, or the sale of purchased inventory in the case of feeding or finishing businesses.

Certified Seed Potato Assistance (1989 to 1993)

The purpose of this Program is to encourage production in Nova Scotia of sufficient high quality seed of licensed potato varieties to supply Provincial requirements.

Compensation for animal losses (1981 to present)

Under the Animal Disease and Protection Act enacted in 1970, producers in all provinces are compensated when farm animals infected with certain contagious diseases are ordered to be slaughtered. Producers in certain provinces are also compensated for animals killed by wildlife, wild dogs, hunters, etc.

Conservation Cover Program (2001 to 2004)

The Conservation Cover Program (CCP) is a four-year initiative of the Government of Saskatchewan that will contribute to the cost of converting cropland to perennial cover. The program offers $15 per acre to a maximum of 50 acres (minimum five acres) per applicant.

Cost of Production Payment Program (COP) (2007 to 2010)

The Cost of Production Payment Program helps non-supply managed commodities producers with the rising cost of production. This federal program is based on producers' net sales for 2000-2004 (or in the case of new producers: payments will be based on average net sales for 2005-2006).

Cover Crop Protection Program (2006 to 2008)

The CCPP is a Government of Canada initiative designed to provide financial assistance to agricultural producers who were unable to seed commercial crops as a result of flooding in the spring of 2005 and/or 2006.

Crop Drought Program (1986 to 1987)

Under the Crop Disaster Assistance Program, payments were made to help maintain crop production in the drought-stricken southern Prairies and Peace River area. Payments based on yield deficiencies were made to Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia farmers who suffered crop damage due to 1985 drought conditions.

Crop Drought Special Assistance (1986 to 1987)

Under a 1985 program, Saskatchewan producers were provided with payments such that crops yielding five bushels or less per acre were treated as a total loss.

Crop Insurance (1981 to present)

The Crop Insurance Act, enacted in 1959, makes available to farmers, in every province, all-risk crop insurance.

Crop Insurance Restoration (1985 to 1988)

Under the Crop Insurance Coverage Restoration Program, payments were provided to help restore Alberta producers' crop insurance coverage to the levels they had prior to the dry weather in 1985.

Crop Loss Compensation (1981 to present)

Under a special assistance program, payments were made to help Quebec, Manitoba and Saskatchewan farmers overcome the effects of adverse weather in 1983 (floods, winterkill and drought). Producers in certain provinces are also compensated for crops damaged by wildlife.

Crop Restoration Program (1997 to 1998)

This program, co-ordinated with the Manitoba Disaster Financial Assistance Program and is a component of the Jobs and Economic Restoration Initiative, is designed to immediately assist farm operators who have been affected by the 1997 flooding in the Red River Valley. It will enable farmers to resume normal operations and ensure that the maximum acreage of crops is seeded in 1997.

Cull Animal Program (2003 to 2006)

This program is intended to assist farmers with the additional cost of feeding surplus animals, thereby discouraging on-farm slaughter and encouraging movement of mature animals to domestic markets in an orderly fashion.

Cull Breeding Swine Program (2008)

This federally funded program for 2008, administered by the Canadian Pork Council, will help restructure the industry to bring it in line with market realities. The objective is to reduce the national breeding herd size by up to 10% over an above normal annual reductions. Producers are eligible to receive a per head payment for each animal slaughtered as well as reimbursement for slaughter and disposal costs. Producers must agree to empty at least one barn, and not restock for a three year period.

Cull Potato Burial Assistance (1986 to 1999 and 2001 to 2002)

Under this program, Prince Edward Island producers are reimbursed 50% of the cost of burying all potatoes.

Dairy Heifer Replacement Bonus (1987 to 1993)

Under the Heifer Bonus Policy, Newfoundland and Labrador producers were provided with payments to offset rearing costs and encourage the local production and upgrading of dairy cow replacements.

Dairy Subsidy (1981 to 2002)

Under the Canadian Dairy Commission Act, enacted in 1966, producers in every province except Newfoundland and Labrador are paid subsidies on shipments of industrial milk and cream that do not exceed Canadian requirements.

Disaster Assistance (Peace River) (1990)

Through the terms of the Public Safety Services Act, assistance was provided to producers who suffered severe crop loss because of heavy rainfall.

Disaster Assistance Program South-East Alberta (1991 to 1996)

This program was established in 1991 in Alberta, under the Public Safety Services Act, in response to a prolonged drought across Southern Alberta.

Drought Assistance for Livestock Producers (2007 to 2008)

This program was enacted in 2007, to assist livestock owners in Northern B.C. who suffered economic hardship in 2006 due to drought. Drought conditions in the summer of 2006 reduced hay and forage yields by up to 50% and producers were left with higher costs for feed, water and other expenses.

Eastern Ontario Disaster Relief (1998 to 1999)

The Eastern Ontario Disaster Relief Committee (EODRC) examines the losses and damages related to agriculture and trees that were submitted in response to the ice storm of 1998. The EODRC is comprised of three main programs: the Ontario Disaster Relief Assistance Program (ODRAP), the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA) and the Canada-Ontario Agreement (COA). The purpose of these programs is to restore economic activity to the agricultural sector of Eastern Ontario impacted by the January 1998 ice storm, by providing financial assistance for full and part-time farmers.

Included as payments in the series «Direct Program Payments to Producers» is the compensation paid to farmers for the losses related to current agricultural production (for example, costs to replace product or input inventories damaged or lost). The amount paid for the replacement or reconstruction of capital assets such as buildings, machinery and equipment was excluded, as it is not related to current agricultural production

Farm Income Adjustment Program (2001 to 2002)

The Farm Income Adjustment Program provides producers of non-supply managed agricultural commodities with a one-time payment to assist them in adjusting to lower prices and higher input costs.

Farm Income Assistance (1990 to 1992)

In order to improve farm incomes in 1990, particularly those of grain and oilseed producers in Western Canada, payments were made to producers.

Farm Income Disaster Program (FIDP) (1999 to present)

This program was established in 1995, and is available to Alberta farmers. It provides a measure of stability against fluctuations in the farm's program margin which is the difference between allowable farm revenue and expenses. It is a whole farm program, which means all agricultural commodities are eligible.

Farm Income Payment (2005 to 2006)

The Farm Income Payment Program was put in place to ease immediate financial pressures on farmers and allow for a transformation of the industry that addresses the root causes of declining farm income.

Farm Income Stabilization Program (ASRA) (1981 To present)

The Farm Income Stabilization Insurance Program is designed to guarantee a positive net annual income to producers in Quebec. The producers participating in the program receive funds when the average selling price falls below the stabilized income. The stabilized income is based on the average production cost in a specific sector. Note that ASRA is complementary to Agri-Stability, ASRA payments decrease in accordance with Agri-Stability payments given.

Farm Income Support Program (2001 to 2002)

The Nova Scotia Farm Income Support Program provided contributions to producers in Nova Scotia for economic hardships experienced in the year 2000.

Farm Support and Adjustment Measures I (1992 to 1993)

This program was announced in the spring of 1991 to help farmers in the grains, oilseeds and horticulture sectors make the transition to the new GRIP and NISA programs.

Farm Support and Adjustment Measures II (1991 to 1993)

In late fall 1991 the Farm Support and Adjustment Measures II program was announced in response to the continuation of the international grain trade war. The program was initiated to provide transitional support to producers until the longer term safety nets programs (GRIP and NISA) were fully implemented. Grain producers were the primary recipients of assistance with lesser amounts available to non-grain sectors including, horticulture, maple syrup, fur, honey and sugar beets.

Fed Cattle Competitive Market Adjustment Program (2003 to 2006)

The program encouraged producers to sell slaughter weight fed heifers or steers by compensating them on a sliding scale. Unlike the competitive bid program, this program did not include an option for producers to set aside a portion of their own herd. Rather, all cattle were required to enter the competitive marketplace.

Fed Cattle Set-Aside (2005 to 2006)

The program is part of a national strategy to assist Canada's cattle industry to reposition itself to help endure its long-term viability.

Feeder Calf Set-Aside Program (2004 to 2006)

The Feeder Calf Set-Aside program is part of a national strategy to assist Canada's cattle industry to reposition itself to help ensure its long-term viability.

Feed Freight Assistance Adjustment Fund (FFAAF) (1996 to 1999)

This program was established as transitional assistance to contribute to the ability of the affected livestock farming operations and industries to adapt to the new economic environment after the Feed Freight Assistance subsidy was terminated.

Feed Grain Adjustment Program (Feed GAP) (1990 to 1994)

This program provided assistance to producers for hogs, lambs, cattle and game animals as long as the animals were finished in the province of Saskatchewan.

Feed Grain Development Program (1988 to 1990)

Under the British Columbia Feed Grain Market Development Program, the province's grain producers received an incentive payment for each eligible ton of grain sold into the British Columbia feed market.

Finished Beef Cattle Assistance Program (1987 to 1988)

Under the Finished Beef Cattle Assistance Program, payments were made to Nova Scotia finished beef producers. The payments per head of finished beef cattle were provided to assist the production of beef cattle in Nova Scotia and provide more stable economic conditions to the feedlot sector of the industry.

Flood compensation (1985 to 1986)

Under disaster financial assistance arrangements, payments were made to Alberta producers for crop losses in regions flooded in the summer of 1986.

Freight Cost Pooling Assistance Program (FCPAP) (1997)

Under the Western Grain Transportation Adjustment Fund (WGTAF) this program will assist producers in Saskatchewan and Manitoba facing higher freight costs because of a change in the Canadian Wheat Board's (CWB) pooling system.

Fresh Vegetable Incentive Program (1985)

Under the Fresh Vegetable Production Incentive Program, payments were made to Alberta producers on an acreage basis to stimulate commercial fresh vegetable production in 1985.

Golden Nematode Disaster Program (2007 to 2009)

Assistance under this program includes a payment to assist producers with the costs of disposal of potatoes from fields that have tested negative, and a per hectare support payment to assist potato producers and producers of nursery and greenhouse crops with extraordinary costs not covered under existing programs.

Grain embargo (1981)

As a result of government actions in response to the Afghanistan situation in 1980, payments were made in compensation for losses resulting from the 1980 partial embargo on grain sales to the Soviet Union. Payments were made to producers in Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia.

Grains and Oilseeds Payment Program (GOPP) (2006)

The Grains and Oilseeds Payment Program is a one-time program for producers of grains, oilseeds, or special crops.

Greenfeed and Livestock Assistance (1988 to 1992)

Under the 1988 Greenfeed and Livestock Drought Assistance Programs, payments were made to livestock producers in Quebec and the Prairie provinces affected by the 1988 drought. Per head payments were made for breeding livestock in order to help producers maintain their herd, and payments were made on a per acre basis for greenfeed in order to increase feed supplies.

Gross Revenue Insurance Plan (GRIP) (1991 to 2002)

The Gross Revenue Insurance Plan (GRIP) was established in 1991 under the Farm Income Protection Act. GRIP builds on crop insurance by providing producers with revenue protection by offering price support in addition to yield protection. Payments are made when a producer's market revenue falls below predetermined target revenue. In 1991, grain and oilseed and specialty crop producers were eligible to participate in GRIP. Starting in 1999, payments under this program (mainly recoveries of overpayments) are included in the Other Payments category.

Herd Maintenance Assistance Program (1980 to 1982)

Under the Herd Maintenance Assistance Program, payments were made to Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta producers to ensure that basic breeding herds were not sold off because of feed shortages as a result of the 1980 drought.

Herd Retention Program (2002 to 2003)

The Herd Retention Program was designed to provide drought relief to livestock producers facing severe, high and moderate drought conditions in Saskatchewan in 2001 and 2002. Producers received payments of $25, $17 or $12 per animal unit (bred female) depending on the assessed severity of the drought for their region.

Hog Industry Development Fund (1996 to 1997)

The purpose of this agreement is to provide financial contributions to enhance research and industry development activities with the objective of promoting and enhancing the competitiveness of the hog industry in Alberta.

Hog Production Compensation (1994)

A further amount was paid to compensate Newfoundland and Labrador farmers for the reduction in government assistance following the closure of the processing plant.

Hog Production Subsidy (1993)

The production subsidy was designed to offset the difference in price that farmers would receive at the New Brunswick processing plant versus the local Newfoundland and Labrador which had closed.

Hog Stabilization Fund N.B. (1998 to 1999)

The Hog Stabilization Fund provides provincial and federal financial assistance to producers in New Brunswick marketing their hogs in this province. This interim program is a stop gap measure between the Triple P Program terminated in August 1997 and the Swine Processing Enhancing Program that started in April 1999.

Hog Transition (1995 to 1996)

Federal and provincial governments agreed to provide transition payments to bridge the gap between the early termination of the National Tripartite Stabilization Plan and the entering of the hog industry into a whole farm income stabilization program (NISA). These benefits to eligible producers are provided in the form of an Individual Producer Account Program (IPA) or a Hog Industry Development Fund (IDF).

Hog Transition Fund (2008)

To assist hog producers having financial difficulties due to declining market prices in 2006-07. The program will be administered through Pork Nova Scotia.

Hog Transportation Assistance (1990 to 1995)

In order to assist with the cost of transporting hogs to slaughter facilities producers in New Brunswick received payments based on the number of hog and the distance to the slaughter plant.

Hog Transportation Subsidy (1993)

The transportation subsidy covered the transportation of hogs to meat packers in New Brunswick following the closure of the government supported abattoir in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Ice Storm Recovery Program (1998 to 2000)

The purpose of the Ice storm Recovery program is to restore economic activity to the agriculture sector of Quebec, impacted by the ice storm of January 1998. It provides financial assistance for part-time farmers. Extraordinary expenses not covered by private insurance companies are eligible for compensation.

Included as payments in the series "Direct Program Payments to Producers" is the compensation paid to farmers for the losses related to current agricultural production (for example, costs to replace product or input inventories damaged or lost). The amount paid for the replacement or the reconstruction of capital assets such as building, machinery and equipment was excluded, as it is not related to current agricultural production.

Interim Red Meat Production Equalization Program (1993 to 1995)

Under this program, eligible livestock owners were provided financial assistance. Payments were based on pounds of gain achieved on animals fed for slaughter in Saskatchewan.

Jobs and Economic Restoration Initiative (JERI) (1997 to 1999)

This federal-provincial cost-shared program is designed to help prevent permanent job loss in flood affected areas of Manitoba, and to restore economic activity.

Lambs Payments (1984)

Under an emergency financial assistance program, payments were made to Saskatchewan sheep producers because of economic difficulties. Payments were made for each lamb marketed in 1983.

Lean Beef Program: Weaning Weight (1996 to 2000)

The P.E.I. Department of Agriculture designed this program to assist beef producers increase weaning weights of calves and improve beef calf quality. A performance incentive is paid per each calf weighting 450 lbs. and over (adjusted weaning weights).

1996 Lesser Slave Lake Area Disaster Recovery Program (1996 to 1998)

The 1996 Lesser Slave Lake Area Disaster Recovery Program covered losses on uninsurable items suffered in the flooded Lesser Lake Area in Alberta. Producers whose main income was from farming were eligible.

Included as payments in the series "Direct Program Payments to Producers" is the compensation paid to farmers for the losses related to current agricultural production (for example, costs to replace product or input inventories damaged or lost). The amount paid for the replacement or the reconstruction of capital assets such as building, machinery and equipment was excluded, as it is not related to current agricultural production.

Livestock Compensation (1982)

Under the South-West Livestock Compensation Program, payments were provided to Saskatchewan producers for livestock lost due to storm conditions in 1982.

Livestock Development Program (1990 to 1993)

Under the Livestock Development Program, livestock producers received payments to assist them in retaining feeder cattle in the provinces of Manitoba (1992 only) and British Columbia.

Livestock Drought (1984 to 1987)

Under the Prairie Livestock Drought Assistance Program, payments were made to help producers in the four Western provinces maintain their breeding herds after the 1984 drought.

Livestock Fodder Procurement (1980 to 1981)

Payments to producers in the Prairie Provinces were made under a three part program: Straw Feed Procurement, Straw Ammonisation, and Green-Feed - For Silage Procurement. The program, complementing the Herd Maintenance Assistance Program, was established to offset some adverse effects of drought conditions in 1980.

Livestock Insurance Programs (1991 to present)

The Livestock Insurance Programs regroups a number of provincially administered livestock insurance programs. These programs include:

The Cattle Price Insurance Program (2009 to present), designed to provide Alberta cattle producers with an effective price risk management tool reflective of their risk;

Dairy Livestock Insurance (1991 to present), implemented to assist Nova Scotia producers when a number of cattle were lost due to disease outbreaks or when there was a significant loss in production, causing a loss of revenue;

Livestock Insurance in Newfoundland and Labrador (1991 to present) compensates producers for the death or injury to sheep, goats, dairy cattle or beef cattle caused by dogs or other predators;

Livestock Insurance in Prince-Edward-Island (2009 to present) offers two types of coverage: compensation to cattle producers for the death of an animal due to disease, as well as compensation to dairy producers whose production levels fall beneath a set threshold, causing a loss of income;

Poultry Insurance (2008 to present) compensates Nova Scotia producers for the loss of poultry (which includes broilers, breeders, breeder pullets, layer pullets, commercial layers and integrated layers) to the disease infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT).

Producer premiums for the Prince-Edward-Island Livestock Insurance and Dairy Livestock Insurance in Nova Scotia (as of 2006) are partially subsidized by the provincial and federal governments.

Premiums are not subsidized for the Cattle Price Insurance Program, Livestock Insurance in Newfoundland and Labrador, or for Poultry Insurance. However, the costs of administrating the programs are funded by provincial governments and/or Crown Corporations.

Prior to 2005, Dairy Livestock Insurance in Nova Scotia and Livestock Insurance in Newfoundland and Labrador were reported under Programs funded by the private sector.

Livestock Predation Compensation Program (1999 to present)

This program compensates livestock producers in Manitoba for losses from injury or death of eligible livestock that resulted from losses due to natural predators such as black bear, cougar, wolf or coyote. Compensation is available to 100% of the assessed value of the animal, for a confirmed loss due to predation and to 50% of the value for a probable loss. In respect for livestock injured, the payment will be the lesser of the veterinary treatment or the value of the livestock. The government of Manitoba pays 60% of program payments and the Government of Canada 40%. Administration costs are cost-shared 50/50 between the Government of Canada and the Government of Manitoba.

Livestock Special Assistance (1986)

Under the Supplemental Livestock Assistance Program, payments were provided to Alberta producers for breeding cows and other qualifying stock. The program was introduced in response to the damaging effects of various weather conditions in 1985.

Livestock Transportation (1984 to 1987)

Under a program instituted in 1984, payments were provided to Saskatchewan livestock producers affected by drought conditions. The assistance was for transportation of livestock from drought condition areas to emergency pastures.

Manitoba Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Feeder Assistance Program (2003 to 2004)

The purpose of this program was to provide feeding assistance payments on finished livestock that were on feed in Manitoba, and had been prevented from being marketed due to restricted slaughter capacity resulting from the United States of America closing its border to related Canadian live animals and meat products.

Manitoba Drought Assistance Program (2003 to 2004)

The purpose of this program is to provide assistance to Manitoba livestock producers who are short of hay and straw.

1999 Manitoba Farm Disaster Assistance Program (MFDAP) Custom Seeding (1999 to 2000)

The Custom Seeding payment is a component of the Manitoba Farm Disaster Assistance Program (MFDAP), introduced to help producers affected by the excess moisture conditions during the spring of 1999. Eligible farmers received a maximum of $10 per seeded acre for costs related to custom land preparation and seeding, retroactive to June 1, 1999.

1999 Manitoba Farm Disaster Assistance Program (MFDAP) Forage Restoration (1999 to 2000)

The Forage Restoration payment is a component of the Manitoba Farm Disaster Assistance Program (MFDAP), introduced to help producers affected by the excess moisture conditions during the spring of 1999. Eligible producers received $75 per acre in financial assistance to help cover the value of lost hay and the cost of restoring tame forage fields damaged by excess moisture.

1999 Manitoba Farm Disaster Assistance Program (MFDAP) Hay Shortfall (1999 to 2000)

The Hay Shortfall payment is a component of the Manitoba Farm Disaster Assistance Program (MFDAP), introduced to help producers affected by the excess moisture conditions during the spring of 1999. Eligible producers receive a $25 per acre payment for hay lands inaccessible because of heavy rain to compensate for feed supply shortages in the winter of 1999-2000. Both tame and native hay acres are eligible, to a maximum of the number of acres normally required to produce the farmers' over winter feed shortfall.

1999 Manitoba Farm Disaster Assistance Program (MFDAP) Unseeded Acreage (1999 to 2000)

The Unseeded Acreage payment is a component of the Manitoba Farm Disaster Assistance Program (MFDAP), introduced to help producers affected by the excess moisture conditions during the spring of 1999. Eligible producers received $50 per acre not seeded on or before June 25 due to excess moisture.

Manitoba Ruminant Assistance Program (2008)

This one-time payment for 2008, funded jointly by the province of Manitoba and the federal government, will allow cattle producers to receive a direct payment of up to 3% of historical net sales. The payment, administered by the Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC), will be provided to all ruminant producers and will be in proportion to the size of the producers livestock operations.

Manitoba Slaughter deficiency Program (2003 to 2005)

The purpose of this program was to provide assistance to Manitoba producers who have experienced depressed slaughter prices for marketed livestock due to BSE and the closure of the U.S. boarder.

New Brunswick BSE Recovery Supplement (2004)

The New Brunswick BSE Recovery Supplement was a provincially funded program which provided deficiency payments to New Brunswick feedlots on finished cattle sold and delivered for slaughter between September 1, 2003, and October 17, 2003. The program was designed to address producer losses during the six-week period immediately after expiry of the BSE Recovery Program.

Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA) (1991 to 2009)

The Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA) was established in 1991 under the Farm Income Protection Act.

The purpose of NISA is to encourage producers to save portion of their income for use during periods of reduced income. Producers can deposit up to 3% of their "Eligible Net Sales" (ENS) annually in their NISA account and receive matching government contributions. The federal government and several provinces offer enhanced matching contributions over and above the base 3% on specified commodities. All these deposits earn a 3% interest bonus in addition to the regular rates offered by the financial institution where the account is held.

Most primary agricultural products are included in the calculation of "Eligible Net Sales" (sales of qualifying commodities minus purchases of qualifying commodities), the main exception being those covered by supply management (dairy, poultry and eggs).

The NISA account is comprised of two funds. Fund No. 1 holds producer deposits while Fund No. 2 contains the matching government contributions and all accumulated interest earned on both Fund 1 and Fund 2. Included as payments in the series «Direct Program Payments to Producers» are the producer withdrawals from Fund 2.

NISA Deposit Assistance Program for Beef (1995 to 1996)

This program provides financial assistance to encourage Nova Scotia beef producers to stabilize farm income by participating in Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA) program. The objective was to assist beef producers in making their match able NISA deposits. Participating producers received a payment based on 2% of their eligible net sales of cattle and calves as reported on their 1995 and 1996 NISA application. This program was exclusively a provincial initiative.

Nova Scotia Beef Kickstart Program (2008)

This one-time payment for 2008 will provide funding for Nova Scotia's beef industry that will help the sector move toward greater economic self-sustainability.

Nova Scotia Beef Producer Assistance (2003 to 2004)

The government of Nova Scotia will provide $100 per breeding cow to assist beef farmers who have been impacted by BSE.

Nova Scotia Margin Enhancement (2007 to 2008)

This initiative introduced in 2006, is a provincial initiative that will provide additional income support to Nova Scotia producers. Using 2003 CAIS program data, reference margins of CAIS participants will be increased by 10%.

Nova Scotia Ruminant Income Support Program (RISP) (2005)

The RISP assisted Nova Scotia producers in meeting financial challenges resulting from the negative market conditions due to BSE. The RISP increased support to the ruminant industry and improved the cash flow positions of producers, assisting them to withstand the negative impacts of the border closure.

Nova Scotia Wildlife Compensation Program (2008 to present)

This cost-shared program, announced in 2008, will help address some of the risks experienced by Nova Scotia farmers regarding damage to eligible agricultural products because of the activities of wildlife. Applicants are not requied to have crop insurance.

NTSP Apple Transitional Program (1997)

An extension of the NTSP Apple Program, this bilateral agreement between Canada and the provinces of Quebec and Nova Scotia entitles apple growers a further assistance. The program is administered both as a national program as well as a direct payment to producers.

Ontario Bridge Funding Payment (OBFP) (2002 to 2004)

The Ontario Bridge Funding Payment (OBFP) represents Ontario's share of the two-year Federal-Provincial-Territorial transition program announced by the federal government in July 2002. This program was designed to assist the agriculture industry's move to the longer-term approach to business risk management.

Ontario BSE Recovery Initiatives (2003 to 2005)

These initiatives were designed to provide compensation for eligible fed cattle owned by the applicant which were set-aside from slaughter for a minimum of eight weeks.

Ontario Cattle, Hog and Horticulture Payment (OCHHP) (2008)

This one-time payment for 2008, funded by the province of Ontario, is to assist farmers suffering from multiple financial pressures due to the stronger Canadian dollar, and lower market prices. Payments for cattle and hog producers will be based on 12% of their historic allowable net sales, while payments for horticulture will be based on 2% of allowable net sales.

Ontario Cost Recognition Top-Up Program (2007 to present)

This program is a 40% matching provincial contribution to the federal Cost of Production Payment Program. This program is a direct payment to producers in recognition of rising production costs over the previous few years. The Ontario Top-Up Program will be distributed after payment details regarding the federal program are released.

Ontario Duponchelia Assistance Program (2008)

The purpose of this initiative is to provide financial support to horticulture producers in the Niagara Region of Ontario affected by Duponchelia, a reportable pest. The initiative will provide a federal share (60%) of financial compensation to assist these producers in addressing plant replacement costs and dealing with extraordinary expenses incurred due to quarantine measures imposed by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

Ontario Edible Horticulture Crop Payment (2006 to 2009)

This one-time payment compensates Ontario producers of edible horticulture crops for losses experienced on their 2005 crop.

Ontario Farm Income Disaster Program (OFIDP) (2001 to 2005)

The Ontario Farm Income Disaster Program (OFIDP) is a whole farm program designed to provide financial support to farmers who experience a significant drop in their income for reasons beyond their control such as declining prices, poor crop yields and increased expenses. The funding is provided to the farmer whose gross margin in the claim year falls below 70% of either their previous 3-year average or their Olympic 5-year average.

Ontario Grain Stabilization Payment (2002 to 2003)

The Ontario Grain Stabilization Payment is a one-time, payment for Ontario grain and oilseed producers. The intent of the initiative is to provide some measure of financial stability to assist Ontario farmers in maintaining competitiveness and offsetting yield reduction, depressed commodity prices and quality reductions for the 2000 crop year.

Ontario Grains and Oilseeds Payment Program (2006 to present)

This one-time program compensates Ontario grain and oilseed producers for losses experienced on their 2005 crop.

Ontario Risk Management Program (2007 to present)

This program, established in 2007, is a price insurance program designed to offset losses caused by low commodity prices in a given year. This three-year pilot program provides much-needed income stability to Ontario's 25,000 grain and oilseed farmers.

Ontario Special Beekeepers Fund (2007 to 2008)

The Special Beekeepers Fund, enacted in June, 2007, provides direct compensation to beekeepers who suffered higher than normal hive losses during the winter of 2006. The assistance will help bring Ontario's bee population back to near-normal levels, and beekeepers back to normal business.

Ontario Whole Farm Relief Program (OWFRP) (1999 to 2005)

Ontario Whole Farm Relief Program (OWFRP) (1999 to 2005)

The Ontario Whole Farm Relief Program was introduced in December 1998 to provide financial assistance to farmers suffering from extremely low commodity prices and weather-related disasters. Funding is provided to individual farmers whose gross margins for the reference year fall below 70% of their three to five year average.

Other Private Programs (2011 to present)

Alberta Hog Levy Refund (2011 to present)

In May 2011, Alberta Pork announced it would refund 85 cents for every dollar of levies it had collected from producers during the 2010-2011 fiscal year to assist producers coping with rising feed costs and small profit margins.

PEI Beef Industry Initiative (2007 to 2008)

This one-time payment for 2008 will assist beef producers in Prince Edward Island to adjust to current market conditions and develop improved quality in their herds. The program will provide immediate assistance to producers to help mitigate risk and it will provide genetic and enhance herd health incentives over a three year period for producers. Payments will be based on a combination of their average net sales and December 2007 inventory.

PEI Cattle Marketing Initiative (2003)

The Department of Agriculture and Forestry in consultation with the PEI cattlemen's Association has established the Cattle Marketing Initiative to provide a means of stabilizing producer prices for cattle going to slaughter.

PEI Hog Transition Fund (2008)

This exit strategy plan would reduce numbers through a buyout program, provide funds to stay and give them until June 2008 to make the transition.

Permanent Cover Crop Program (1991 to 1992)

The primary objective of the Permanent Cover Program was to reduce soil degradation on marginal lands that had high erosion risk under annual cultivation. It provided assistance to farmers to convert eligible lands from annual crops to perennial forage or tree cover. An initial seeding payment—Permanent Cover Establishment Assistance— was paid to offset some of the cash costs related to plantings forages or trees.

Farmers who chose to sign long-term contracts subsequently received a second payment—Land Use Contract Assistance—intended to offset some of the costs related to changing from growing annual crops to growing permanent cover crops.

Included in the Direct Program Payments (DPP) series is the initial payment only.

The Permanent Cover Program was entirely funded by the Government of Canada and delivered through PFRA (Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration), within four provinces—Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia.

Potato Disposal Adjustment Program (2001)

The purpose of the program is to provide a one-time decoupled payment to producers to assist in the disposal of surplus potatoes as a result of potato wart and subsequent US border closures.

Potato Diversion (1986)

As part of the Potato Diversion Program, Prince Edward Island producers received payments on a per hundred weight basis for a proportion of the 1985-86 potato crops.

Potato Diversion Program 2001 (2001)

As part of the potato diversion program, Prince Edward Island Producers received payments on a per hundredweight basis for a proportion of the 2000-2001 potato crops.

Price Stabilization Payments – Agricultural Stabilization Act (ASA) (1981 to 1995)

The A.S.A., enacted in 1958, provides payments to producers in every province during periods of low commodity prices. Payments are made whenever the average market prices of commodities covered under the Act fall below calculated support prices. Mandatory support is provided for cattle, hogs, lambs and wool; industrial milk and industrial cream; corn and soybeans; and spring wheat, winter wheat, oats and barley not produced in the designated area of the Canadian Wheat Board. Other commodities may be designated for support by the Governor in Council.

Private hail insurance (1981 to present)

Private Hail Insurance is purchased by agricultural producers to protect themselves against the loss of their crops due to hail. Hail insurance is privately funded through producer premiums and producers may have the option to extend coverage for damage to crops due to loss through fire, depending on the insurance provider.

Producer Assistance 2003 (2003)

Producer Assistance 2003 was a transition measure until the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) program came into effect.

« Programme d'appui à la replantation des vergers de pommiers au Québec » (2007 to 2010)

The first component of this MAPAQ program offers replanting help in order to improve efficiency, profitability as well as competitiveness. The objective of the second component is to compensate apple producers for the loss of apple trees due to winter-kill (frost) in 1994.

« Programme de reconstruction économique temporaire » (1997 to 1998)

The purpose of this program was to restore economic activity to the regions of Quebec impacted by the heavy rains that occurred on July 19 and 20, 1996, mainly in the regions Saguenay/Lac St.Jean. It provided financial assistance for part-time farmers. Extraordinary expenses not covered by private insurance companies were eligible for compensation.

Included as payments in the series "Direct Program Payments to Producers" is the compensation paid to farmers for the losses related to current agricultural production (for example, costs to replace product or input inventories damaged or lost). The amount paid for the replacement or the reconstruction of capital assets such as building, machinery and equipment was excluded, as it is not related to current agricultural production.

This is a federal-provincial cost shared program.

« Programme de soutien de l'industrie bovine à la suite de l'ESB » (2003 to 2005)

This program is part of the financial action taken by the Québec government, which aims at supporting the cattle industry following the decrease in prices resulting from the mad cow disease crisis. It enables farm enterprises to receive financial assistance for semi-finished cattle sold between May 20 and December 31, 2003, and for feeder cattle and slaughter cattle sold and slaughtered between July 6 and December 31, 2003

« Programme spécial relatif aux pluies de juillet 1996 » (1996 to 1998)

The purpose of this program was to restore economic activity to the regions of Quebec impacted by the heavy rains that occurred on July 19 and 20, 1996, mainly in the regions Saguenay/Lac St.Jean. It provided financial assistance for full-time farmers. Extraordinary expenses not covered by private insurance companies were eligible for compensation.

Included as payments in the series "Direct Program Payments to Producers" is the compensation paid to farmers for the losses related to current agricultural production (for example, costs to replace product or input inventories damaged or lost). The amount paid for the replacement or the reconstruction of capital assets such as building, machinery and equipment was excluded, as it is not related to current agricultural production.

This is a federal-provincial cost shared program.

« Programme spécial relatif au verglas de janvier 1998 » (1998 to 2001)

The purpose of this program is to restore economic activity to the agriculture sector of Quebec impacted by the ice storm of January 1998. It provides financial assistance for full-time farmers. Extraordinary expenses not covered by private insurance companies are eligible for compensation.

Included as payments in the series "Direct Program Payments to Producers" is the compensation paid to farmers for the losses related to current agricultural production (for example, costs to replace product or input inventories damaged or lost). The amount paid for the replacement or the reconstruction of capital assets such as building, machinery and equipment was excluded, as it is not related to current agricultural production.

This is a federal-provincial cost shared program.

Provincial Stabilization Programs (1981 to present)

Under provincial stabilization programs, payments are made in order to support producer incomes affected by small profit margins, or low prices, for selected commodities. Provincial stabilization programs are partly funded by provincial governments, either directly through the subsidization of producer premiums, or indirectly by absorbing a part, or the whole, of the cost of administering the program. These programs are optional, and producers are required to pay premiums in order to participate.

Farm Income Stabilization Program (ASRA) (1981 to present)

The Farm Income Stabilization Insurance Program is designed to guarantee a positive net annual income to producers in Quebec. Producers participating in the program receive funds when the average selling price falls below a stabilized income, which is based on the average production cost in a specific sector. ASRA is complementary to AgriStability, but participation in AgriStability is not mandatory. Payments under ASRA decrease in accordance to amounts paid out through AgriStability. ASRA premiums are partially funded by the provincial government, which pays two thirds of the cost of premiums, while producers pay the remaining third.

Ontario Risk Management Program (2007 to present)

ORMP is a provincial program that offers compensation to Ontario producers for losses of income caused by fluctuating market prices and rising production costs. Commodities eligible for compensation include a variety of grains and oilseeds, as well as certain livestock, including cattle, calves, hogs and sheep. The program also offers compensation for unseeded acres, under certain conditions. In order to participate in this program, producers must also participate in AgriStability, as well as Production Insurance (for grains and oilseeds). Payments made under ORMP count as an advance on the provincial portion of AgriStability for the corresponding program year. Because ORMP is provincially funded, it has no impact on the federal portion of AgriStability payments. ORMP premiums are partly funded by the provincial government, which pays 40% of the cost of premiums, while producers pay the remaining 60%.

PVYn Compensation Program (1991 to 1993)

A compensation program was announced in spring 1991 to reimburse potato producers in Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Ontario, and Alberta for losses incurred as a result of the potato virus Y necrotic (PVYN) eradication program. Some limited additional aid was also included in the program to address subsequent occurrences of the virus.

PVYn Settlement (1995)

A settlement for Prince Edward Island potato farmers who were affected by the losses related to errors made in testing the 1991 potato crop for PVYN.

Red Delicious Apple Assistance (1988 to 1989)

Payments were provided to apple growers across Canada for the Red Delicious variety because of extraordinarily low prices.

Replant Adjustment Program Losses (1992 to 1993 and 1996)

This program guarantees growers specific annual revenue per acre during the first three years following the replant of orchards to new varieties.

Saskatchewan Cattle and Hog Support Program (2009)

This program will help producers retain their breeding herds and address immediate cash flow needs.

Saskatchewan Fed Livestock Competitive Market Adjustment Program (2003 to 2004)

This program was designed to compensate producers who sell their eligible cattle in a competitive market. Producers are compensated for a portion of their market loss.

Saskatchewan Feed and Forage Program 2011 (2011 to present)

This program provides compensation to producers who must transport additional feed to their livestock, or transport their livestock to alternate locations for feeding and grazing, due to feed shortages caused by excess moisture. In addition, financial assistance is provided to producers who must reseed hay, forage or pasture land that has been damaged by excess moisture. This provincially-funded program replaces the initial Saskatchewan Feed and Forage Program (2010-2011), which was jointly offered by the provincial and federal governments, as part of AgriRecovery.

Saskatchewan Set-Aside Program (2003)

The program was designed to allow producers to access the same level of compensation that is available under the Slaughter Element of the BSE Recovery Program without having to market their livestock for slaughter. By allowing cattle feeders to set-aside 10% (or 45 head which ever is greater) of their eligible livestock, fewer cattle will be available for slaughter, possibly creating a positive impact on fat cattle prices.

Self Directed Risk Management (SDRM) (2005 to present)

SDRM is a provincial program designed to help Ontarian horticultural producers manage farm operation risk. Under the program, over 150 edible horticultural crops are eligible for coverage, including fruits, vegetables, mushrooms, herbs and spices, nuts, honey and maple products. To be eligible, producers must also participate in AgriStability, and meet the minimum amount of allowable net sales (ANS). Participating producers can deposit up to a maximum of 2% of their ANS into an account, and have their contribution matched by the provincial government. Payments made under SDRM count as an advance on the provincial portion of AgriStability for the corresponding program year. Because SDRM is provincially funded, it has no impact on the federal portion of AgriStability payments. Amounts received under Production Insurance for a crop also covered by SDRM will be deducted from SDRM payments.

SIR Clean up and Compliance Grant (2000 to 2001)

The Clean-up Compliance Grant is a component of the Sterile Insect Release program (SIR) in British Columbia. It is designed to partially offset the additional costs of an intensive spray program or other pest management methods that are required to reduce wild codling moth populations.

South western Alberta Grass Fire Disaster Recovery Program (1998)

Funded by the Alberta Government, the South western Alberta Grass Fire Disaster Recovery Program assisted municipalities and individuals affected by the grass fire that swept through parts of south western Alberta on December 14, 1997. Included in the Direct Program Payments (DPP) series is only the one-time compensation payment to farmers for loss of non-insurable winter pasture.

Special Atlantic Livestock Incentive (1989 to 1993)

Payments were made to livestock producers in Atlantic Canada in order to help maintain these industries. Payments were made on hogs, cattle and sheep.

Special Canadian Grains Program (1987 to 1990)

Under the Special Canadian Grains Program, payments were made to producers to help offset low grain and oilseed prices resulting from weak international markets and the United States - European Economic Community trade war.

Special Drought Assistance (1989 to 1992)

Due to losses suffered as a result of the drought in the summer of 1988, producers in every province from Quebec to British Columbia received assistance.

Special Support Program for Hog Operations Affected by Post Weaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome (PMWS) (2008 to 2010)

This MAPAQ program grants financial support to Quebec feeder hog operations affected by Post Weaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome (PMWS).

1997 Special Transitional Payment (1997 to 1998)

The 1997 Special Transitional Payment was set up in British Columbia when the Transitional Production Adjustment Program (TPAP) was prematurely terminated as a result of budget cuts. The objective of the Special Transitional Payment was to make a one time payment to growers who would have otherwise qualified for a payment under the Transitional Production Adjustment Program (TPAP) for 1994, 1995 and 1996 plantings. Eligible producers were orchard operators who had satisfactorily completed a replant project, under the Okanagan Valley Tree Fruit Authority Replant Program in 1994-1996.

Special Tree Fruit Assistance (1991 to 1992)

Under this 1991 program tree fruit growers in British Columbia received financial support for maintenance of the longer term viability of the industry. The assistance was targeted to several areas including marketing, research and development and the replanting of orchards to profitable varieties.

Stop Loss for Hogs (1980 to 1981)

Under the '1980-81 Emergency Stop Loss Program for Hogs', payments were made to Alberta producers whenever market prices for slaughter hogs fell below specified support prices.

Straw for Feed (1986)

Due to the 1985 drought conditions, payments were made under the Straw for Feed Program to British Columbia grain producers who sold straw to livestock producers.

Sugar Beet Incentive (1980 to 1981)

Producers in Manitoba and Alberta were provided with an incentive grant to produce sugar beets in 1986.

Sugar Beet Subsidy (1986)

Payments on a per tonne basis were made to Manitoba sugar beet producers because of low sugar prices in 1985.

Swine Incentive (1985 to 1990)

Under the Swine Incentive Policy, established in 1985, payments are provided to Prince Edward Island producers on all hogs marketed and on all hogs marketed above individually established base production.

Swine Processing Enhancing Program (1999 to 2001)

The Swine Processing Enhancing Program provides financial assistance to producers in New Brunswick for hogs slaughtered in this province. When the market price drops below the set floor price, the provincial government and the processors each pay half of the difference to hog producers (up to a maximum contribution of $20 per hog from each). The processors retain the right to "claw-back" from the producers, if hog prices improve, any of their contribution over $10 per hog.

Temporary guidelines modifications (1985 to 1986)

Under the Crop Insurance Modifications to Retain Feed in Drought Areas Program, payments were provided on 1985 crops cut for feed purposes to encourage Alberta farmers to cut as much drought affected crop as possible for feed.

Tobacco Deficiency Payment (1990 to 1991)

A loss encountered by the Tobacco Board when it purchased surplus tobacco was covered by the Agricultural Products Co-op Marketing Agency.

2003 Transition Funding (2003 to 2005)

Producers received direct payments for their share of a second instalment of federal transition funding (totalling $1.2 billion over two years) to help them move to new business risk management programs.

Transition Financial Assistance (TFA) Program (1995 to 1996)

Under the Tree Fruit Revitalization program, this program provided further transition assistance to tree fruit growers, while helping to offset the impact of lower prices for their 1993 and 1994 crop. The program also provided transition assistance from the previous support programs to the on-going Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA) Program.

Transitional Industry Support Program (TISP) (2004 to 2006)

The Transitional Industry Support Program (TISP) was designed to support the integrity of the Canadian agricultural industry. The program included direct payments to producers of cattle and other ruminant animals, and general payments that represent bridging assistance to help the industry transition to new business risk management programming. The programs that are listed in this category are Alberta Industry Transitional Program, British Columbia Industry Transitional Program, Other Ruminant Industry Transitional Program and Manitoba Other Ruminant Industry Transitional Program.

Transitional Production Adjustment Program (TPAP) (1996) (1993 to 1997 and 1999 to 2011)

Under the Tree Fruit Revitalization Program, this program was designed to guarantee British Columbia orchardists specific annual revenue per acre during the first three years, following replant of orchards to new high density tree fruit varieties. This program is also known, since 2009, as the Replant/Grafting and Budding program.

Transportation Adjustment Fund (TAF) (2000 to 2002)

Transportation Adjustment Fund (TAF) is a one time Provincial payment in British Columbia, intended to give financial assistance to grain and oilseed growers to offset increased transportation costs.

Tripartite Payments - Agricultural Stabilization Act (ASA) (1986 to 1998)

Under an amendment to the A.S.A., in 1985, stabilization plans can be established on a commodity basis. Each commodity stabilization plan provides for price stabilization according to pre-set formula. Payments are made to producers whenever market prices fall below the stabilization price. By September 1987, plans had been established in various provinces for the following commodities: slaughter cattle, feeder cattle, feeder calves, hogs, lambs, white beans, coloured beans, sugar beets and apples. Starting in 1999, payments under this program (mainly recoveries of overpayments) are included in the Other Payments category.

Unseeded Acreage Payment (UAP) 2006 (2006 to present)

This program provides a payment to Saskatchewan farmers who experienced excess moisture conditions prior to June 20, 2006 and were unable to seed 95% of the acres they would normally intend to seed.

Waterfowl Damage (1981 to present)

Payments have been made to farmers every year since 1972 to minimize crop losses caused by migratory waterfowl.

Weanling Pig Bonus (1976 to 1993)

Under the Weanling Bonus Incentive Program, established in 1976, payments were made to Newfoundland and Labrador producers for each weanling pig produced.

Weather-Related Loss Provision Program (2000 to 2002)

The Weather-Related Loss Provision Program is designed to assist Nova Scotia farmers who are recovering from financial losses to their farm incurred in the 1997 growing seasons as the direct result of adverse weather conditions. The program provides assistance in making payments on the principal of loans taken out to offset these weather-related losses.

Western Diversification Restart Program (1997)

This program is a component of the Jobs and Economic Restoration Initiative. It makes available accountable cash advances to business people and farm operators who have been affected by the 1997 flooding in the Red River Valley. The assistance is available for such things as building repair and livestock replacement.

Western Grain Stabilization Act (1981 to 1998)

The Western Grain Stabilization Act, enacted in 1976, was established to stabilize producers' net proceeds from the production and sale of wheat, oats, barley, rye, flaxseed, canola and mustard seed produced in the Prairie Provinces and the Peace River region of British Columbia.

Amendments to the Act in 1988 provided for the addition of nine crops to the seven currently covered. These included: triticale; mixed grains; sunflower; safflower; buckwheat; peas; lentils; fababeans; canary seed. Starting in 1999, payments under this program (mainly recoveries of overpayments) are included in the Other Payments category.

White Fat Cows and Bulls Market Transition Program (2005)

This program was designed to help producers while the industry moves towards new market realities in response to the issue of BSE.

Wildlife Compensation Companion Program (2002 to present)

The British Columbia Wildlife Compensation program was part of an Agricultural Environment Partnership Initiative that included the following programs: The Waterfowl Damage to Forage Fields in Delta, Wild Predator Loss Control and Compensation Program for Cattle and East Kootenay Agriculture Wildlife Pilot Project. These programs are designed to compensate producers for the losses incurred to crops and livestock due to wildlife.

Wintering Beef Cattle (1981 to 1984)

Under the Wintering Beef Cattle Assistance Program, Quebec producers were provided with financial assistance for wintering their cows.

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