Changes in employment rates in the largest census metropolitan areas

Substantial improvement in Victoria's employment rate

  • The employment rate for Victoria has increased substantially since 1996, peaking at 64.6% in 2007. Employment gains since 1996 have been widespread, including in those in construction and several other industries.

  • The MontréalCMA has made impressive gains in its employment rate since 1996, when the rate increased from 56.1% to a new high of 62.7% in 2007. Employment gains in recent years have been spread across several service industries, which has more than offset declines in manufacturing.

  • Employment has increased strongly in Ottawa–Gatineau since 2005, causing the employment rate to rise to a new high of 68.5% in 2007, the third-highest among the largest CMAs behind Calgary and Edmonton. Employment gains have been widespread in a number of industries. However, employment in computer and telecommunications in 2007 remained well below the peak attained in 2000.

  • The employment rate in Vancouver did not increase to the same extent since 1996 as it did in Toronto and Montréal. While Vancouver experienced strong growth in employment, growth of the working-age population kept the employment rate from rising more quickly. In recent years, however, employment growth, led by construction, has outpaced population growth.

  • Among the 14 largest CMAs, Kitchener's employment rate increased the least from 1996 to 2007, rising by only 1.6 percentage points. Despite this slower rate of growth and declines in manufacturing since its peak in 2000, the employment rate in the CMA was still high at 66.4%.

Chart D.2
Changes in employment rates in the largest census metropolitan areas, from 1996 to 2007

Chart D.2 Changes in employment rates in the largest census metropolitan areas, from 1996 to 2007

Source: Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey, CANSIM table 282-0053.

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