Employment rates of full-time students

More students combine school and work

  • Whether by necessity, by desire to make more money, or to gain work experience, a significant number of youths have a job while they are full-time students. In 2007, two in five full-time students aged 15 to 24 were in this situation (40.8%).

  • Over the 1980s, the proportion of youth who juggled work and full-time school increased dramatically, reaching a peak of 41.4% in 1989. Spurred by the recession at the start of the decade, the rate fell for most of the 1990s. It was not until 1998 that the proportion of employed full-time students began to increase. From a low of 32.0% in 1997, it hit 40.8% in 2007.

  • The increase in the employment rate among full-time students during the 1980s was shared equally among those aged 15 to 19 and 20 to 24, but during the decline in the 1990s, it fell only for 15- to 19-year-olds. Since that time, older students have remained more likely to have a job than teenage students.

  • In 2007, nearly three in five full-time students (61.0%) who were working were employed as retail salespeople, cashiers, clerks, cooks, food counter and kitchen helpers, food and beverage servers or grocery shelf stockers.

Chart F.3
Employment rates of full-time students during school months, by age, 1976 to 2007

Chart F.3 Employment rates of full-time students during school months, by age, 1976 to 2007

Note: School months are an average of January to April and September to December.
Source: Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey, CANSIM table 282-0005.
Date modified: