Days lost per worker

Days lost from work are increasing

  • Absences from work because of personal reasons (which include own illness or disability and other personal or family demands) have increased in recent years. In 2007, full-time employees holding one job missed 10.2 days of work versus 7.4 in 1997. Several factors account for the rising trend, notably, the aging of the work force and the growing share of women in the work force, especially mothers with young children.

  • Women were absent from work more days than men (12.0 versus 8.8 days in 2007). The presence of preschool-aged children exerts a strong influence on work absences, especially for women. In 2007, the average days lost for mothers with preschoolers at home was 14.7 days as opposed to 11.7 days for fathers with preschoolers at home. Workdays missed because of illness or disability increased with age, from an average of 6.0 days for those aged 15 to 24 to 11.2 days for full-time employees aged 55 and over.

  • The number of days lost differs by public or private sector, with almost all of the difference a result of illness and disability absences. In 2007, full-time employees in the public sector lost more days (12.8 days) than those in the private sector (9.5 days).

Chart H.5
Days lost per worker for personal reasons, by sex and age, 1997 and 2007

Chart H.5 Days lost per worker for personal reasons, by sex and age, 1997 and 2007

Note: Days lost exclude maternity leave.
Source: Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey, CANSIM table 282-0029.

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