Unemployment rate, by region or country of birth

Most recent immigrants, regardless of region or country of birth, had unemployment rates higher than their Canadian-born counterparts

  • Countries of birth for immigrants to Canada have changed over the past few decades, shifting most notably in the mid-1980s from mainly European toward Asian countries. In 2007, many immigrants aged 25 to 54 who had landed within the previous five years (i.e., recent immigrants) had experienced more difficulties in the labour market, regardless of their region of birth, than their Canadian-born counterparts.

  • Recent immigrants born in Southeast Asia, particularly those born in the Philippines, had comparable unemployment and employment rates to the core working-age Canadian born, while recent immigrants born elsewhere in Asia (including the Middle East), as well as individuals born in Latin America, Europe and Africa, all had higher unemployment rates and lower employment rates in 2007 than their Canadian-born counterparts.

  • Among core working-age immigrants who landed in Canada from 1997 to 2002, those born in Europe had an unemployment rate, employment rate and participation rate in 2007 that were similar to that of their Canadian-born counterparts.

  • Most immigrants aged 25 to 54 who landed in Canada more than 10 years earlier had unemployment rates that were similar to that of the Canadian born. The two exceptions were those born in Latin America or Africa, whose unemployment rates were higher than that of the Canadian born (7.3% and 7.0% vs. 4.6%, respectively).

Chart N.4
Unemployment rate by region or country of birth, Canadian born and recent immigrants, population aged 25 to 54, 2007

Chart N.4 Unemployment rate by region or country of birth, Canadian born and recent immigrants, population aged 25 to 54, 2007

Source: Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey, 2007.

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