Employment rates, by educational attainment and Aboriginal identity

Education impacts labour market outcomes

  • In 2006, 45% of Aboriginal people aged 25 to 54 years were postsecondary graduates: 14% had a trade credential, 19% had a college diploma and 8% had a university degree. Aboriginal people 25 to 54 years of age were more than twice as likely as their non-Aboriginal counterparts to have not completed high school (33% versus 13%), while non-Aboriginal people were three times more likely to have a university degree (25% versus 8%).

  • Employment rates tend to rise with higher educational attainment. In 2006, the employment rate for Aboriginal people aged 25 to 54 years with less than high school education was 47%. In contrast, the employment rate among university-educated Aboriginal people was 38 percentage points higher, at 85%, and was nearly identical to the rate of non-Aboriginal people with a university degree.

  • For First Nations people without a high school diploma, employment rates were lower on-reserve and for those with treaty or registered Indian status. In 2006, the employment rate for First Nations people aged 25 to 54 years living on-reserve who had not completed high school was 37%, while it was 49% for their off-reserve First Nations counterparts. Among the off-reserve population, 46% of First Nations people with registered status were employed, compared with 56% of their counterparts who were not registered Indians (56%).

  • The employment rate of Inuit who had not completed high school was 49%, while the rate was higher for the Métis, at 59%. In contrast, university-educated Inuit, Métis and First Nations people had similar employment rates to non-Aboriginal people, at around 80%.

Chart O.3
Employment rates of people aged 25 to 54, by educational attainment and Aboriginal identity, 2006

Chart O.3 Employment rates of people aged 25 to 54, by educational attainment and Aboriginal identity, 2006

Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population.

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