1. Health status

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Well-being
Health conditions
Human function
Deaths

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1.1 Well-being

Perceived health

Definition:
Population aged 12 and over who reported perceiving their own health status as being excellent or very good.

Perceived health is an indicator of overall health status. It can reflect aspects of health not captured in other measures, such as: incipient disease, disease severity, aspects of positive health status, physiological and psychological reserves and social and mental function. Perceived health refers to the perception of a person's health in general, either by the person himself or herself, or, in the case of proxy response, by the person responding. Health means not only the absence of disease or injury but also physical, mental and social well being.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

Perceived mental health

Definition:
Population aged 12 and over who reported perceiving their own mental health status as being "excellent or very good", or "fair or poor", depending on the indicator.

Perceived mental health provides a general indication of the population suffering from some form of mental disorder, mental or emotional problems, or distress, not necessarily reflected in self-reported (physical) health.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

Perceived life stress

Definition:
Population aged 15 and over who reported perceiving that most days in their life were quite a bit or extremely stressful. Perceived life stress refers to the amount of stress in the person's life, on most days, as perceived by the person or, in the case of proxy response, by the person responding.

Stress carries several negative health consequences, including heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, as well as immune and circulatory complications. Exposure to stress can also contribute to behaviours such as smoking, over-consumption of alcohol, and less-healthy eating habits.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

1.2 Health conditions

Adult body mass index

Note(s): Definition change was implemented in 2004 to conform to Health Canada guidelines for body weight classification.

Definition:
Body Mass Index (BMI) is a method of classifying body weight according to health risk. It is calculated for the population aged 18 and over, excluding pregnant females and persons less than 3 feet (0.914 metres) tall or greater than 6 feet 11 inches (2.108 metres). BMI is calculated as follows: weight in kilograms divided by height in metres squared.

According to World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Canada guidelines, health risk levels are associated with each of the following BMI categories: normal weight = least health risk; underweight and overweight = increased health risk; obese class I = high health risk; obese class II = very high health risk; obese class III = extremely high health risk.

The index is: under 18.5 (underweight); 18.5 to 24.9 (normal weight); 25.0 to 29.9 (overweight); 30.0 to 34.9 (obese-Class I); 35.0 to 39.9 (obese-Class II); 40 or greater (obese - Class III).

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

Youth body mass index

Definition:
BMI is calculated as follows: weight in kilograms divided by height in metres squared.

BMI for youth is different from that of adults as they are still maturing. This indicator classifies children aged 12 to 17 (except female respondents aged 15 to 17 who were pregnant or did not answer the pregnancy question) as "obese" or "overweight" according to the age- and sex-specific BMI cut-off points as defined by Cole et al. The Cole cut-off points are based on pooled international data (Brazil, Great Britain, Hong Kong, Netherlands, Singapore and United States) for BMI and linked to the internationally accepted adult BMI cut-off points of 25 (overweight) and 30 (obese).

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

Arthritis

Definition:
Population aged 14 and over who reported that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having arthritis. In 2009, the data was reported for population aged 14 and over. Prior to 2009, data for this indicator covered population aged 12 and over. Arthritis includes both rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, but excludes fibromyalgia.

The term 'arthritis' describes many conditions that affect joints, the tissue surrounding joints, and other connective tissue. The most common types are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. The resulting pain, stiffness, swelling and/or deformity of the joints can substantially reduce quality of life.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

Diabetes

Definition:
Population aged 12 and over who report that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having diabetes. Diabetes includes females 15 and over who reported that they have been diagnosed with gestational diabetes.

Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin, or when the insulin produced is not used effectively. Diabetes may lead to a reduced quality of life as well as complications such as heart disease, stroke and kidney disease.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

Asthma

Definition:
Population aged 12 and over who report that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having asthma.

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways that causes coughing, shortness of breath, chest tightness and wheezing. Quality of life can be affected not only by asthma attacks, but also by absences from work and limitations in other activities.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

High blood pressure

Definition:
Population aged 12 and over who report that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having high blood pressure.

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, increases the risk of stroke, heart attack and kidney failure. It can narrow and block arteries, as well as strain and weaken the body's organs.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

Definition:
Population aged 35 and over who reported being diagnosed by a health professional with chronic bronchitis, emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

Pain or discomfort that prevents activities

Definition:
Population aged 12 and over who report having pain or discomfort which prevents activities.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

Pain or discomfort by severity

Definition:
Population aged 12 and over who reported that they usually have pain or discomfort. Severity of pain is measured as severe or moderate.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

Mood disorders

Definition:
Population aged 12 and over who report that they have been diagnosed by a health professional as having a mood disorder, such as depression, bipolar disorder, mania or dysthymia.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

Low birth weight

Definition:
Live births less than 2,500 grams, expressed as a percentage of all live births with known birth weight.

Low birth weight is a key determinant of infant survival, health, and development.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Birth Database.

High birth weight

Definition:
Live births with a birth weight of 4,500 grams or more, expressed as a percentage of all live births with known birth weight.

High birth weight can result in complications for the infant and mother during birth and may be associated with an increased risk of diabetes.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Birth Database.

Small for gestational age

Definition:
Live births with a birth weight less than the 10th percentile of birth weights of the same sex and the same gestational age in weeks from Kramer et al. "A New and Improved Population-based Canadian Reference for Birth Weight for Gestational Age". Expressed as a percentage of live singleton births with gestational ages from 22 to 43 weeks.

Small for gestational age is a determinant of infant survival, health, and development.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Birth Database.

Large for gestational age

Definition:
Live births with a birth weight more than the 90th percentile of birth weights of the same sex and the same gestational age in weeks from Kramer et al. "A New and Improved Population-based Canadian Reference for Birth Weight for Gestational Age". Expressed as a percentage of live singleton births with gestational ages from 22 to 43 weeks.

Large for gestational age can result in complications for the infant and mother during birth and may be associated with an increased risk of diabetes.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Birth Database.

Pre-term births

Definition:
Live births with a gestational age less than 37 weeks expressed as a percentage of all live births (gestational age known). Pre-term birth is a determinant of infant survival, health, and development.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Birth Database.

Cancer incidence

Definition:
Age-standardized rate of new primary sites of cancer (malignant neoplasms) per 100,000 population, for all cancers.

Specific site codes: colon/rectum (ICD–O–3 C18.0 to C18.9, C19.9, C20.9, C26.0), lung (ICD–O–3  C34.0 to C34.9), female breast (ICD–O–3 C50.0 to C50.9), and prostate (ICD–O–3 C61.9).

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Cancer Database, Canadian Cancer Registry, and Demography Division (population estimates).

Injury hospitalization

Definition:
Age-standardized rate of acute care hospitalization due to injury resulting from the transfer of energy (excluding poisoning and other non–traumatic injuries), per 100,000 population.

Injury is identified by the first documented external cause of injury code with a diagnosis type of "9":

ICD–9

E800 to E807, E810 to E838, E840 to E848, E880 to E888, E890 to E902, E906 to E910, E913 to E928, E953 to E958, E960 to E961, E963 to E968, E970 to E976, E978, E983 to E988, E990 to E998.

ICD–10–CA

V01 to V06, V09 to V99, W00 to W45, W46, W49 to W60, W64 to W70, W73 to W77, W81, W83 to W94, W99, X00 to X06, X08 to X19, X30 to X39, X50, X52, X58, X59, X70 to X84, X86, X91 to X99, Y00 to Y05, Y07 to Y09, Y20 to Y36.

This indicator contributes to an understanding of the adequacy and effectiveness of injury prevention efforts, including public education, product development and use, community and road design, and prevention and treatment resources.

Source (s):
Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), National Trauma Registry (NTR); Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec.

Injuries

Definition:
Population aged 12 and over who sustained injuries in the past 12 months and who sought medical attention from a health professional in the 48 hours following the injury. Repetitive strain injuries are not included. Refers to injuries which are serious enough to limit normal activities. For those with more than one injury in the past 12 months, refers to "the most serious injury", as identified by the respondent.

Population aged 12 and over who sustained injuries in the past 12 months and who sought medical attention from a health professional in the 48 hours following the injury. Repetitive strain injuries are not included.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey

Hospitalized Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) event rate

Definition:
Age-standardized rate of new AMI events admitted to an acute care hospital per 100,000 population age 20 and older. A new event is defined as a first-ever hospitalization for an AMI or a recurrent hospitalized AMI occurring more than 28 days after the admission for the previous event in the reference period. A person may have more than one AMI event in the reference period.

ICD-10-CA

 I21, I22

AMI is one of the leading causes of morbidity and death. Measuring its occurrence in the population is important for planning and evaluating preventive strategies, allocating health resources and estimating costs. From a disease surveillance perspective, there are three groups of AMI events: non-diagnosed events, fatal events occurring outside the hospital and those admitted to acute care hospitals. Although AMIs admitted to a hospital do not reflect all acute myocardial infarctions in the community, this information provides a useful and timely estimate of the disease occurrence in the population.

Myocardial infarction is labeled as acute with a stated duration of four weeks (28 days) or less in ICD-10-CA and eight weeks or less in ICD-9/9-CM. Therefore, a 28-day period to define a new AMI event is applicable only to the records coded in ICD-10-CA

Source (s):
Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), Discharge Abstract Database (DAD); Fichier des hospitalisations MED-ÉCHO, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec.

Hospitalized stroke event rate

Definition:
Age-standardized rate of new stroke events admitted to an acute care hospital per 100,000 population age 20 and older. New event is defined as a first-ever hospitalization for stroke or a recurrent hospitalized stroke occurring more than 28 days after the admission for the previous event in the reference period.  A person may have more than one stroke event in the reference period. 

ICD-10-CA

 I60–I64

ICD-9-CM  

430–432; 433–434 (with fifth digit of 1) and 436

Stroke is one of the leading causes of long-term disability and death. Measuring its occurrence in the population is important for planning and evaluating of preventive strategies, allocating health resources and estimating costs. From a disease surveillance perspective, there are three groups of strokes: fatal events occurring out of the hospital, non-fatal stokes managed outside acute care hospitals and those admitted to an acute care facility. Although strokes admitted to a hospital do not reflect all stroke events in the community, this information provides a useful and timely estimate of the disease occurrence in the population.

Source (s):
Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), Discharge Abstract Database (DAD)

1.3 Human function

Functional health

Definition:
Population aged 12 and over reporting measures of overall functional health, based on 8 dimensions of functioning (vision, hearing, speech, mobility, dexterity, feelings, cognition and pain). A score of 0.8 to 1.0 is considered to be very good or perfect health; scores below 0.8 are considered to indicate moderate to poor functional health .

Otherwise known as the Health Utility Index (HUI), this index, developed at McMaster University's Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, is based on the Comprehensive Health Status Measurement System (CHSMS).

Source(s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

Participation and activity limitation

Note(s): Activity limitation data from the National Population Health Survey and the Canadian Community Health Survey are not comparable due to differences in questions and response categories between the two surveys.

Definition:
Population aged 12 and over who report being limited in selected activities (home, school, work and other) because of a physical condition, mental condition, or health problem which has lasted or is expected to last six months or longer.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey.

Disability-free life expectancy

Definition:
Life expectancy is the number of years a person would be expected to live, starting from birth (for life expectancy at birth) or at age 65 (for life expectancy at age 65), on the basis of the mortality statistics for a given observation period.

Disability-free life expectancy is a more comprehensive indicator than that of life expectancy because it introduces the concept of quality of life. It is used to distinguish between years of life free of any activity limitation and years experienced with at least one activity limitation. To that end, disability–free life expectancy establishes a threshold based on the nature of such limitations. Years of life lived in conditions above this threshold are counted in full. Those lived in conditions below the threshold are not counted. Thus, the emphasis is not exclusively on the length of life, as is the case for life expectancy, but also on the quality of life.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, Demography Division (population estimates), and the 1996 Census.

Disability-adjusted life expectancy

Definition:
Life expectancy is the number of years a person would be expected to live, starting from birth (for life expectancy at birth) or at age 65 (for life expectancy at age 65), on the basis of the mortality statistics for a given observation period.

Disability-adjusted life expectancy (DALE) is a more comprehensive indicator than that of life expectancy because it introduces the concept of quality of life. DALE integrates data on mortality, long–term institutionalization and activity limitations in the population and represents a comprehensive index of population health status. Thus, the emphasis is not exclusively on the length of life, but also on the quality of life.

To calculate DALE, a set of weights (relative values) is assigned to four states of health. These states are, in order from greatest to least weight: no activity limitations, activity limitations in leisure activities or transportation, activity limitations at work, home and/or school and institutionalization in a health care facility in order to establish units of equal value. These units are summed to yield a type of quality adjusted life expectancy.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, Demography Division (population estimates), and the 1996 Census.

Health-adjusted life expectancy

Definition:
Life expectancy is the number of years a person would be expected to live, starting from birth (for life expectancy at birth) or at age 65 (for life expectancy at age 65), on the basis of the mortality statistics for a given observation period.

Health-adjusted life expectancy is a more comprehensive indicator than that of life expectancy because it introduces the concept of quality of life. Health-adjusted life expectancy is the number of years in full health that an individual can expect to live given the current morbidity and mortality conditions. Health-adjusted life expectancy uses the Health Utility Index (HUI) to weigh years lived in good health higher than years lived in poor health. Thus, health-adjusted life expectancy is not only a measure of quantity of life but also a measure of quality of life.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Canadian Vital Statistics, Birth and Death Databases and population estimates; Canadian Community Health Survey; National Population Health Survey, Health institutions component; Residential Care Facilities Survey; Canadian Health Measures Survey; Census of population.

1.4 Deaths

Infant mortality

Definition:
Infants who die in the first year of life, expressed as a count and a rate per 1,000 live births.

A long-established measure, not only of child health, but also of the well–being of a society. This indicator reflects the level of mortality, health status, and health care of a population, and the effectiveness of preventive care and the attention paid to maternal and child health.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Birth and Death Databases.

Perinatal mortality

Definition:
Count and rate of late fetal deaths (stillbirths with a gestational age of 28 weeks or more) and early neonatal deaths (deaths of infants aged less than one week) per 1,000 total births (includes stillbirths). Stillbirths with unknown gestational age are excluded.

The probability that a viable fetus will be stillborn or will die before the end of the first week of life. This indicator reflects standards of obstetric and pediatric care, as well as the effectiveness of public health initiatives.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Birth, Death and Stillbirth Databases.

Premature mortality

Definition:
Age-standardized rate of premature deaths per 100,000 population. Premature deaths are those of individuals who are younger than age 75.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database

Life expectancy

Definition:
Life expectancy is the number of years a person would be expected to live, starting from birth (for life expectancy at birth) or at age 65 (for life expectancy at age 65), on the basis of the mortality statistics for a given observation period.

A widely used indicator of the health of a population. Life expectancy measures quantity rather than quality of life.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

Age-standardized mortality rate (for provincial/territorial level time-series)

Definition:
Age-standardized rate of death for selected causes per 100,000 population.

From 1979 to 1999, causes of death were classified according to the International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision (ICD-9). The year 2000 and subsequent years available are classified according to the Tenth Revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD–10). Selected causes are defined as follows: Colorectal cancer (ICD-10 C18 to C21 or ICD-9 153 to 154), lung cancer (ICD–10 C33 to C34 or ICD–9 162), female breast cancer (ICD–10 C50 females specified or ICD–9 174), prostate cancer (ICD–10 C61 or ICD–9 185), acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (ICD–10 I21 to I22 or ICD–9 410), cerebrovascular diseases (ICD–10 I60 to I69 or ICD–9 430 to 438), all stroke (selected cerebrovascular diseases) (ICD–10 I60 to I66 or ICD–9 430 to 432, 434, 436).

Indicates the overall health of the population and is similar to what is measured by life expectancy.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

Total mortality

Definition:
Crude rate and age-standardized rate of death from all causes per 100,000 population.

Indicates the overall health of the population and is similar to what is measured by life expectancy.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

All diseases of the circulatory system deaths

Definition:
Crude rate and age-standardized rate of death from diseases of the circulatory system per 100,000 population: for all diseases of the circulatory system (ICD–10 I00 to I99), ischaemic heart disease (ICD–10 I20 to I25), cerebrovascular diseases (ICD–10 I60 to I69) and all other circulatory diseases (ICD to 10 I00 to I02, I05 to I09, I10 to I15, I26 to I28, I30 to I52, I70 to I79, I80 to I89, I95 to I99).

Measures long-term success in reducing deaths due to circulatory disease, compared with other regions, provinces, and countries. Lower death rates indicate success in circulatory disease prevention, detection, and treatment.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

All malignant neoplasms (cancer) deaths

Definition:
Crude rate and age-standardized rate of death from cancer per 100,000 population: for all cancers (ICD-10 C00 to C97) and for specific sites: colorectal (ICD–10 C18 to C21), lung (ICD–10 C33 to C34), female breast (ICD–10 C50), and prostate cancer (ICD–10 C61).

Measures long-term success in reducing deaths due to cancer, compared with other regions, provinces, and countries. Lower death rates indicate success in cancer prevention, detection, and treatment.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

All diseases of the respiratory system deaths

Definition:
Crude rate and age-standardized rate of death from diseases of the respiratory system per 100,000 population: for all respiratory diseases (ICD–10 J00 to J99), pneumonia and influenza (ICD–10 J10 to J18), bronchitis/ emphysema/asthma (ICD–10 J40 to J43, J45 to J46) and all other diseases of the respiratory system (ICD–10 J00 to J06, J20 to J22, J30 to J39, J44, J47, J60 to J70, J80 to J84, J85 to J86, J90 to J94, J95 to J99).

Measures long–term success in reducing deaths due to respiratory disease, compared with other regions, provinces, and countries. Lower death rates indicate success in respiratory disease prevention, detection, and treatment.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

Suicide

Definition:
Crude rate and age-standardized rate of suicide death (ICD–10 X60 to X84, Y87.0) per 100,000 population.

Measures long-term success in reducing suicide, a social as well as a major public health concern.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

Unintentional injury deaths

Definition:
Crude rate and age-standardized rate of death from unintentional injuries per 100,000 population. Unintentional ("accidental") injuries includes injuries due to causes such as motor vehicle collisions, falls, drowning, burns, and poisoning, but not medical misadventures/complications (ICD–10 V01 to X59, Y85 to Y86).

Measures long-term success in reducing deaths due to unintentional injuries, compared with other regions, provinces, and countries. Measures the adequacy and effectiveness of injury prevention efforts, including public education, community and road design, prevention, emergency care, and treatment resources.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

AIDS deaths

Definition:
Crude rate and age-standardized rate of deaths due to AIDS and HIV infections (ICD–10 B20 to B24) per 100,000 population.

Measures success in preventing and treating AIDS and HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus, the agent that causes AIDS). Information on deaths can be used to estimate the number of persons living with HIV/AIDS, as well as the impact of treatment.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) – for provincial/territorial level time–series

Definition:
Potential years of life lost (PYLL) is the number of years of life "lost" when a person dies "prematurely" from any cause – before age 75. A person dying at age 25, for example, has lost 50 years of life.

Potential years of life lost are calculated by taking the median age in each age group, subtracting from 75, and multiplying by the number of deaths in that age group disaggregated by sex and cause of death. These data are presented as a standardized rate per 100,000 population.

Causes of death are classified according to the International Classification of Disease (ICD–9) from 1979 to 1999. The year 2000 and subsequent years available are classified according to the Tenth Revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD–10). Provincial level PYLL was calculated only for suicide and unintentional injuries for the years 2000 and 2001 only. Selected causes are defined as follows: colorectal cancer (ICD–9 153 to 154), lung cancer (ICD–9 162), female breast cancer (ICD–9 174), prostate cancer (ICD–9 185), acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (ICD–9 410), cerebrovascular diseases (ICD–9 430 to 438), all stroke (ICD–9 430 to 432, 434, 436), unintentional injuries (ICD–10 V01 to X59, Y85 to Y86 or ICD–9 E800 to E929 excluding E870 to E879), suicides (ICD–10 X60 to X84, Y87 or ICD–9 E950 to E959).

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) – for total mortality

Definition:
Potential years of life lost (PYLL) for total mortality is the number of years of life "lost" when a person dies "prematurely" from any cause – before age 75. A person dying at age 25, for example, has lost 50 years of life.

PYLL are calculated by taking the median age in each age group, subtracting from 75, and multiplying by the number of deaths in that age group disaggregated by sex and cause of death. These data are presented as a count (total PYLL) and as a rate per 100,000 population.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) – for all cancer deaths

Definition:
Potential years of life lost (PYLL) for all malignant neoplasms ( ICD–10 C00 to C97) and for specific sites: colorectal (ICD–10 C18 to C21), lung (ICD–10 C33 to C34), female breast cancer (ICD–10 C50), and prostate cancer (ICD–10 C61) is the number of years of life "lost" when a person dies "prematurely" from any cancer – before age 75. A person dying at age 25, for example, has lost 50 years of life.

Potential years of life lost are calculated by taking the median age in each age group, subtracting from 75, and multiplying by the number of deaths in that age group disaggregated by sex and cause of death. These data are presented as a count (total PYLL) and as a rate per 100,000 population.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) – for all circulatory disease deaths

Definition:
Potential years of life lost (PYLL) for all circulatory disease deaths (ICD–10 I00 to I99) and specific causes: ischaemic heart disease (ICD–10 I20 to I25), cerebrovascular diseases (stroke) (ICD–10 I60 to I69) and all other circulatory diseases (ICD–10 I00 to I02, I05 to I09, I10 to I15, I26 to I28, I30 to I52, I70 to I79, I80 to I89, I95 to I99) is the number of years of life "lost" when a person dies "prematurely" from any circulatory disease – before age 75. A person dying at age 25, for example, has lost 50 years of life.

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) are calculated by taking the median age in each age group, subtracting from 75, and multiplying by the number of deaths in that age group disaggregated by sex and cause of death. These data are presented as a count (total PYLL) and as a rate per 100,000 population.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) – for all respiratory disease deaths

Definition:
Potential years of life lost (PYLL) for all respiratory disease deaths (ICD–10 J00 to J99) and for specific causes: pneumonia and influenza (ICD–10 J10 to J18), bronchitis/emphysema/asthma (ICD–10 J40 to J43, J45 to J46) and all other respiratory diseases (ICD–10 J00 to J06, J20 to J22, J30 to J39, J44, J47, J60 to J70, J80 to J84, J85 to J86, J90 to J94, J95 to J99) is the number of years of life "lost" when a person dies "prematurely" from any respiratory disease – before age 75. A person dying at age 25, for example, has lost 50 years of life.

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) are calculated by taking the median age in each age group, subtracting from 75, and multiplying by the number of deaths in that age group disaggregated by sex and cause of death. These data are presented as a count (total PYLL) and as a rate per 100,000 population.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) – for unintentional injuries

Definition:
Potential years of life lost (PYLL) for unintentional injuries (ICD-10 V01 to X59, Y85 to Y86) is the number of years of life "lost" when a person dies "prematurely" from unintentional injuries – before age 75. A person dying at age 25, for example, has lost 50 years of life.

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) are calculated by taking the median age in each age group, subtracting from 75, and multiplying by the number of deaths in that age group disaggregated by sex and cause of death. These data are presented as a count (total PYLL) and as a rate per 100,000 population.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) – Suicide

Definition:
Potential years of life lost (PYLL) for suicide and self-inflicted injuries (ICD–10 X60 to X84, Y87.0) is the number of years of life "lost" when a person dies "prematurely" from suicide – before age 75. A person dying at age 25, for example, has lost 50 years of life.

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) are calculated by taking the median age in each age group, subtracting from 75, and multiplying by the number of deaths in that age group disaggregated by sex and cause of death. These data are presented as a count (total PYLL) and as a rate per 100,000 population.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) – AIDS deaths

Definition:
Potential years of life lost (PYLL) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection deaths (ICD-10 B20 to B24) is the number of years of life "lost" when a person dies "prematurely" from AIDS/HIV – before age 75. A person dying at age 25, for example, has lost 50 years of life.

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) are calculated by taking the median age in each age group, subtracting from 75, and multiplying by the number of deaths in that age group disaggregated by sex and cause of death. These data are presented as a count (total PYLL) and as a rate per 100,000 population.

Source (s):
Statistics Canada, Vital Statistics, Death Database, and Demography Division (population estimates).

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