Fruit and vegetable consumption, 2011

Fruit and vegetables are an important source of vitamins, minerals and fibre. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of heart disease and some types of cancer1.

Fruit and vegetable consumption data are based on a survey question that measures the number of times respondents reported that they consumed fruit and vegetables, rather than the actual quantity consumed.

In 2011, 40.4% of Canadians aged 12 and older reported that they consumed fruit and vegetables five or more times per day, down for a second year in a row since 2009 when the estimate peaked at 45.6%. In 2010, fruit and vegetable consumption had declined for the first time since 2001.

From 2001 to 2011, females were more likely than males to consume fruit and vegetables five or more times daily. In 2011, 47.2% of females consumed fruit and vegetables five or more times daily, compared to 33.5% of males (Chart 1).

Chart 1
Percentage reporting that they consumed fruit and vegetables at least five times daily, by sex, household population aged 12 or older, Canada, 2001 to 2011

Description

Chart 1 Percentage reporting that they consumed fruit and vegetables  at least five times daily, by sex, household population aged 12 or older, Canada, 2001 to 2011

Source: Canadian Community Health Survey, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011.

In 2011, more than 44%of females in each age group reported that they ate fruit and vegetables five or more times daily. Young males aged 12-19 (43.7%) were more likely to consume fruit and vegetables five or more times a day compared to males in all other age groups (Chart 2).

Chart 2
Percentage reporting that they consumed fruit and vegetables at least five times daily, by age group and sex, household population aged 12 or older, Canada, 2011

Description

Chart 1 Percentage reporting that  they consumed fruit and vegetables at least five times daily, by age group and  sex, household population aged 12 or older, Canada, 2011

Source: Canadian Community Health Survey, 2011.

Quebec (46.8%) was the only jurisdiction in which residents reported eating fruit and vegetables at least five times daily at a rate that was above the national average in 2011. Residents of Alberta (41.7%), British Columbia (40.7%), and Yukon (41.5%) reported consuming fruit and vegetables at least five times daily at about the same rate as the Canadian average. In all other provinces and territories the rate was lower than the national average.


End note

  1. Pérez, Claudio E. 2002. "Fruit and vegetable consumption." Health Reports. Vol. 13, no. 3. March. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 82-003. page 23. /studies-etudes/82-003/archive/2002/6103-eng.pdf (accessed May 10, 2010).

References

Garriguet, Didier. 2007. "Canadians' eating habits." Health Reports. Vol. 18, no. 2. May. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 82-003. pages 17–32. /pub/82-003-x/2006004/article/habit/9609-eng.pdf (accessed May 10, 2010).

Pérez, Claudio E. 2002. "Fruit and vegetable consumption." Health Reports. Vol. 13, no. 3. March. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 82-003. pages 23–31. /studies-etudes/82-003/archive/2002/6103-eng.pdf (accessed May 10, 2010).

Data

Additional data from the Canadian Community Health Survey are available from CANSIM table 105–0501.