Exposure to second-hand smoke at home, 2013

‘Passive smoking,’ or exposure to second-hand smoke, has negative respiratory health effects. Two of the most common diseases associated with breathing in second-hand smoke are lung cancer in adults and asthma among children.

The proportion of non-smokers aged 12 and older who were regularly exposed to second-hand smoke at home was 4.5% in 2013, around the same as 2012. This rate has declined significantly since 2003 when it was 10.6%. The rate of exposure to second hand smoke at home was the same for both males and females in 2013 (Chart 1).

In 2013, 10.5% of young Canadians aged 12 to 19 were exposed to second-hand smoke at home—a decrease from 23.4% in 2003 (Chart 1). This age group is the most likely to be exposed to second hand smoke at home. Of the 1.1 million non-smoking Canadians aged 12+ who were regularly exposed to second-hand smoke at home, the 12 to 19 age group made up 28.3%.

Chart 1

Description for Chart 1

Females aged 20 to 34 were significantly more likely than males to be exposed to second-hand smoke at homeNote 1; however, there was no significant difference between the sexes in other age groups (Chart 2).

Chart 2

Description for Chart 2

The proportion of residents who reported exposure to second-hand smoke at home was lower than the national average (4.5%) in:

  • Ontario (3.9%)
  • British Columbia (2.2%)

The proportion of residents who reported exposure to second-hand smoke at home was higher than the national average in:

  • Nova Scotia (8.1%)
  • Quebec (6.7%)

Residents of the other provincesNote 2 and territoriesNote 2 had rates that were about the same as the national average.


End notes

References

Shields, Margot. 2007. “Smoking—prevalence, bans and exposure to second-hand smoke.” Health Reports, 18(3): 67–85. http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-003-x/2006007/article/smoking-fumer/10198-eng.pdf (accessed June 3, 2010)

Pérez, Claudio E. 2004. “Second-hand smoke exposure—who's at risk.” Health Reports, 16(1): 9–17. http://www.statcan.gc.ca/studies-etudes/82-003/archive/2004/7037-eng.pdf (accessed June 3, 2010)

Bearer C. 1995. “Environmental health hazards: how children are different from adults.” The Future of Children:Critical Issues for Children and Youths. Vol. 5. no. 2. pp11-26. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1602354 (accessed May 15, 2013).

Data

Additional data from the Canadian Community Health Survey are available from CANSIM table 105–0501.

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