Table 1.3
PS-TRE — Description of proficiency levels

Table 1.3
PS-TRE — Description of proficiency levels
Table summary
This table displays the results of ps-tre — description of proficiency levels. The information is grouped by level (appearing as row headers), score range, percentage of the population aged 16 to 65 and characteristics of ps-tre tasks (appearing as column headers).
Level Score range Percentage of the population aged 16 to 65 Characteristics of PS-TRE tasks
3 341-500 6% of populations across OECD and 7% in Canada can successfully perform tasks at Level 3 At this level, tasks typically require the use of both generic and more specific technology applications. Some navigation across pages and applications is required to solve the problem. The use of tools (e.g., a sort function) is needed to make progress towards the solution. The task may involve multiple steps and operators. The goal of the problem may have to be defined by the respondent, and the criteria to be met may or may not be explicit. There are typically high monitoring demands. Unexpected outcomes and impasses are likely to occur. The task may require evaluating the relevance and reliability of information in order to discard distractors. Integration and inferential reasoning may be needed to a large extent.
2 291-340 34% of populations across OECD and 37% in Canada can successfully perform tasks at least at Level 2

Adults scoring at Level 2:
28% OECD
29% Canada
At this level, tasks typically require the use of both generic and specific technology applications. For instance, respondents may have to make use of a novel online form. Some navigation across pages and applications is required to solve the problem. The use of tools (e.g., a sort function) can facilitate resolution of the problem. The task may involve multiple steps and operators. The goal of the problem may have to be defined by the respondent, though the criteria to be met are explicit. There are higher monitoring demands. Some unexpected outcomes or impasses may appear. The task may require evaluating the relevance of a set of items to discard distractors. Some integration and inferential reasoning may be needed.
1 241-290 63% of populations across OECD and 67% in Canada can successfully perform tasks at least at Level 1

Adults scoring at Level 1:
29% OECD
30% Canada
At this level, tasks typically require the use of widely available and familiar technology applications, such as e-mail software or a web browser. There is little or no navigation required to access to the information or commands required to solve the problem. The problem may be solved regardless of respondents’ awareness and use of specific tools and functions (e.g., a sort function). The tasks involve few steps and a minimal number of operators. At the cognitive level, the respondent can readily infer the goal from the task statement; problem resolution requires the respondent to apply explicit criteria; and there are few monitoring demands (e.g. the respondent do not have to check whether he or she has used the appropriate procedure or made progress towards the solution). Identifying contents and operators can be done through simple match. Only simple forms of reasoning, such as assigning items to categories, are required; there is no need to contrast or integrate information.
Below 1 0-240 Adults scoring below Level 1:
12% OECD
15% Canada
Tasks are based on well-defined problems involving the use of only one function within a generic interface to meet one explicit criterion without any categorical, inferential reasoning or transforming of information. Few steps are required and no sub goal has to be generated.
PS-TRE non-respondents 24% OECD
19% Canada
This category includes those individuals who did not report previous computer experience, did not pass the ICT core test, or opted not to be assessed by a computer-based test.
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