Transcript of the chat session on 2016 Census: Journey to work, language of work, mobility and migration data, which occurred on Friday, December 4, 2017 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. EST

Note: This was a bilingual chat session, which means that the participants were able to submit their questions in English or French. Statistics Canada respects the Official Languages Act and is committed to ensuring that information products of equal quality are available in both English and French. For that reason, all the questions and answers have been translated in the other official language.

 Moderator at 12:25:27
Welcome everyone! This is a bilingual chat session, which means that you can submit your questions in English or French. Our experts will respond in a timely manner and in the official language in which the question was asked.

 rfarquha at 12:32:45
Do you have data relating frequency of travel to age -- for example: Are people over age 65 more or less likely to travel than adults younger than 65?

 Jason Gilmore at 12:40:51
Hi @rfarquha
We do not collect data on frequency of travel.
Please check out this link to data tables we have available for Journey to work.

 rshahid at 12:30:58
Is there any information in census that shows how many seniors moved out of province/municipality after retiring?

 Mark Knarr at 12:42:02
Hello, thank you for your question.
With the mobility data tables you are able to see respondents who moved out at the Census Metropolitan Area/Census Agglomeration (CMACA) or province level by 5 year age groups up to 85 years of age and older.  However, by age alone we are not able to determine which respondents of a given age grouping are retired.
You can find out migration information at the following links:
5 year migration for provinces
5 year migration for CMA/CA
1 year migration for provinces
1 year migration for CMA/CA

 randhill at 12:31:57
Hi! Thanks so much for this session. Very much looking forward to chatting with you all. I had 2 questions to begin with, relating to Journey to work data 1. What are the main methodological differences specific to Journey to work between 2006 Census, 2011 NHS and 2016 Census? In what way (especially 2006 and 2016 data) are they comparable and in what way are they not? 2. Is it possible, through custom tabulation request, receive access to journey to work csd commuting flow broken down by either occupation or demographic information without having to go through micro data access? Thanks so much!

 Jason Gilmore at 12:43:22
Hello randhill! Thanks for your questions.
1) There are no notable methodological differences specific to Journey to work 2006, 2011 and 2016. The journey to work data on main mode of commuting are comparable across the three cycles. The differences of note, though, are: (a) in 2011, 'public transit' was further refined to specify the type of public transit; (b) in 2011, differentiation in the number of people in a private vehicle were added; and (c) in 2011, the questions on commuting duration and time leaving for work were also added.
So, for example, if you want to compare proportions using car, public transit, walk and cycle, you can compare 2006, 2011 and 2016 no problem. For duration, for example, you can compare 2011 and 2016.

2) Yes, custom tabulation requests can be made for CSD commuting flow data broken down with more detail than is currently available (total, male, female). Obviously the results will still have to follow the same rules, including only providing flows of 20 or more people.
I trust these answers your questions!

 gjolicoeur at 12:30:48
Hello, What is the smallest geographic area available that provides the residents' place of residence and place of work, for example to create origin-destination matrices? Where do we find these data for a specific region, such as the Greater Montréal area. Is this how the "median commute" is calculated in the media these days? Thank you.

 Emmanuelle Bourbeau at 12:44:33
Hi @gjolicoeur,
Thank you for your question. The most detailed level of geography for the origin-destination matrices is the census subdivision. Here is the link to the table. For more detailed geography levels, you must submit a special request to STATCAN.infostats-infostats.STATCAN@canada.ca.
To answer your second question, the distance from home to work refers to the distance in a straight line, in kilometres, between a person's home and his or her usual place of work.

 cdraper978 at 12:30:28
Hello, question on OLMC/HR planning: Currently, with the language of work, we only have NOC 11 and NAICS 21 (the most aggregated levels). We also cannot cross-tabulate NOC and NAICS (at this stage, the wealth of public data tables is worse than with the NHS). How far can StatCan go to equip OLMCs in terms of HR planning in areas such as health and justice, and always in an open data environment? A sufficient level of detail is required at the NOC level (core groups, 4 digits, ideally) and NAICS (sub-sectors, 3 digits), otherwise we need to continuously develop assumptions. Moreover, could the FOLS not be used in these tables rather than (or in addition to) mother tongue?

 Jean-Pierre Corbeil at 12:49:10
Hello,
Thank you for your question. Please note that many other statistical tables will be available on the Statistics Canada website by the end of March 2018. Many of them will include statistics on the first official language spoken, the language of work, industry sectors and occupations. To get data on the language of work using NOC (four-digit) and NAICS (three-digit), several options are possible: the public use microdata file will be released in 2018 (date to be confirmed soon) and the census microdata file will be available in Statistics Canada's 33 research data centres. Custom requests can also be made to the statistical information line at STATCAN.infostats-infostats.STATCAN@canada.ca.

 Hawkeye1967 at 12:34:30
Did Census data from 2016 capture anything with respect to mobility or migration for Indigenous people going from rural/remote/isolated/on reserve locations to more urban areas or vice versa?

 Patrick Charbonneau at 12:51:18
Hi Hawkeye1967!
Thank you for your question. Various data tables were released with respect to mobility and migration. In those tables, it is possible to see the results according to sex, age, mother tongue and marital status. We did not release data tables that show mobility according to the Aboriginal identity specifically. However, we could help you out with your question if you submit a custom request. It should also be possible to do your own analysis using public microdata files to be released later in 2018.
Finally, you may be interested to know that some analysts here at Statistics Canada are presently working on studying migration behaviours of Aboriginal peoples. You may see some analytical products on that topic that are going to be released in the future.

 JOANOSBORN at 12:33:56
Hi. We are interested in comparing data from the journey to work 2016 results to those of the 2011 National Household Survey results, and are wondering if there are any issue we should be concerned about in comparing the result of these two surveys. We are particularly interested in comparing distance travelled, duration of commute, and # working within a CD or CSD for those commuting by motor vehicle (all types as specified in survey(s). We would like to look at this at the CD and CSD level for British Columbia and possibly by CA and CM level for BC. Are there any concerns with making these comparisons?

 Jason Gilmore at 12:52:33
Hello JOANOSBORN! Thank you for your questions.

There are no notable methodological differences specific to Journey to work 2011 and 2016. The journey to work data on main mode of commuting are comparable across the two cycles.

For the variables you have listed, they are fully comparable. The only thing you will need to note are geography boundary changes in CD, CSD, CMA or CA from 2011 to 2016. That can make a difference in making comparisons between these two cycles. Here is a link to GeoSuite, which can help you identify 2011-2016 boundary changes in specific communities.

Thank you for your questions!

 CharanS at 12:51:58
Hello everyone, sorry joining you little late -:)

 Moderator at 12:54:15
Thanks for joining! Send us your questions!

 JOANOSBORN at 12:55:13
Thank you very much Jason! Very much appreciated.

 Jason Gilmore at 12:57:48
You're welcome, JOANOSBORN!

 jdacosta at 12:37:46
Hi - thank you for hosting this chat. I have the same question as randhill regarding commuting "flows". What is the best means of accessing that data?

 Emmanuelle Bourbeau at 12:58:06
Hi @jdacosta,
Thank you for your question! You will find commuting flow data at the municipal level in table 325, and by census metropolitan area in table 327.

 jasmine.ing at 12:40:19
Hi there, do you have any advice about comparisons over time? Specifically, do you have advice about whether it is more appropriate to compare 2016 Census data on journey to work, language of work and/or mobility and migration to the 2011 NHS or 2006 Census?

 Jean-François Lepage at 12:59:26
Hi jasmine.ing. Thanks for your question. Generally speaking, we have to be careful making comparisons between the 2011 NHS and a census. As indicated in the note published with the 2011 National Household Survey results, the high rates of non‑response and imputation can affect the comparability with census data. We would recommend to compare 2016 Census data with 2006 Census data, especially for small geographies.
Nevertheless, you can compare 2016 data with 2011 NHS data taking into account the specific information for each topic. The concepts haven't changed for language of work (some language categories have been added) and mobility and migration. The journey to work data on main mode of commuting are comparable across the three cycles. The differences of note, though, are: (a) in 2011, 'public transit' was further refined to specify the type of public transit; (b) in 2011, differentiation in the number of people in a private vehicle were added; and (c) in 2011, the questions on commuting duration and time leaving for work were also added. So, for example, if you want to compare proportions using car, public transit, walk and cycle, you can compare 2006, 2011 and 2016 without problem. For duration, for example, you can compare 2011 and 2016.

 bilodan at 12:57:20
Thank you, Jason, for the details of the 2011-to-2016 comparison.

 Jason Gilmore at 13:01:11
You're welcome @bilodan.

 randhill at 12:58:37
Thanks so much Jason!

 Jason Gilmore at 13:03:16
You're welcome randhill!

Our Reference Guide can also provide you information about 2016 Journey to Work, including comparability over time and any minor changes to 2016 processes, etc.

 rkhamilton_1957 at 12:57:47
Hi there - with regard to the language of work, are there breakdowns available for immigrants and if so at what level of detail? Thanks for this session.

 Jean-Pierre Corbeil at 13:04:34
Hi, please find all currently available tables on language of work and immigrant status at various levels of detail here.
Regards

 Valeriy1968 at 13:02:25
Me too, I just joined ! What is a top subject ?

 Moderator at 13:06:41
Great, welcome! This chat session is on 2016 Census Journey to work, language of work, mobility and migration data. Send us your questions!

 gjolicoeur at 13:01:16
Commuting data involves the "employed labour force aged 15 years and over with a usual place of work". Is school considered a place of work for students? Can you confirm if student travel to school is included?

 Emmanuelle Bourbeau at 13:15:22
Hi @gjolicoeur,
Thank you for your question! The school is not considered a place of work for students. However, it is possible for students to work at the school they attend. In this case, the commute would be included.
Students often work after school hours near the school. As a result, the data may have commuting and transportation patterns that are unusual compared with their place of residence. For more information please consult the Journey to Work Reference Guide, Census of Population, 2016.

 CharanS at 13:01:30
Linguistic diversity is growing within Canadian Learning Environments. I am engaged in mutual language learning project at a Post Secondary Instt in Toronto; First Language Canadian learner peer-to-peer collaborate using technologies to learn prominent other languages such as Spanish, Mandarin, Punjabi, French and so on from the native speakers of these languages. Q. What kind of data set Statistics Canada currently maintains on multi-language learning trends or Q. How could Statistics Canada provide expert advise on such diversity languages projects piloted within Post Secondary learning environment. Thanks. Much appreciated.

 Jean-Pierre Corbeil at 13:21:30
Thank you CharanS for your interesting question. Unfortunately, Statistics Canada has very limited information or data on this specific topic. However, given that this is a very relevant topic, I encourage you to get in touch with our colleagues from the Centre for Education Statistics at statcan.education-education.statcan@canada.ca. They will get in touch with us and we could see how we can provide any help or information on this topic.
Best regards

 CharanS at 13:13:40
Q. Are there any projects, that Statistics Canada has data, that are aimed at engaging/ utilizing the first language -linguistic- competencies of immigrating student population in post secondary institutions or other higher education? With growing globalization- could this be a step towards exposing Canadian students for inter-cultural, language learning exchanges; based on our research, less than fifteen percent of Canadian students are interested for such mutual learning, meta-cognition, buildings reflective practices; not many Canadians are participating in global learning by going abroad to study.

 Jean-Pierre Corbeil at 13:22:03
Hi again CharanS,
Still another very interesting question for which we unfortunately have limited data and information. To my knowledge, no such data program exists on this topic at Statistics Canada.
Regards

 CharanS at 13:22:27
Thanks @Jean-Pierre Corbeil. Appreciated. Cheers ! C

 Jean-Pierre Corbeil at 13:25:37
You are welcome CharanS!

 Valeriy1968 at 13:28:10
It was interesting ! Thank you !

 Moderator at 13:09:21
Thank you for participating. Keep your questions coming!
Merci de participer. Continuez de nous envoyer vos questions!

 Moderator at 12:47:38
Thank you for participating. Keep your questions coming!
Merci de participer. Continuez de nous envoyer vos questions!

 gjolicoeur at 13:28:17
Hello @EmmanuelleBourbeau To return to your answer below, "distance from home to work" refers to the distance in a straight line, in kilometres, between a person's home and his or her usual place of work". (1) Is this information available disaggregated, or it is instead calculated from the representative points of a geographic area? (2) Where can I download the different representative points (weighted or unweighted) of geographic areas? Thank you.

 Emmanuelle Bourbeau at 13:41:28
Hello @gjolicoeur,
Interesting question! You can get the data at more detailed geographic levels. The most disaggregated level is the dissemination block. However, there are some limitations in terms of confidentiality and data quality. You have to make a special, for-fee request to infostats and they can give you more information about what is available.

 Moderator at 13:30:00
The chat session is now over. Thank you for your questions and comments! If our experts did not have a chance to respond to your question, we will follow-up with you by email in the next few business days. The full transcript of this chat session will be made available on our website shortly. Have comments or feedback about our Chat with an Expert events? Email us at statcan.chatwithanexpert-clavarderavecunexpert.statcan@canada.ca. Have a great day!

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