2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey

A brief portrait of education and employment.

Note: The 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey provides data on First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit. The data provided in this video focus specifically on the subjects of education and employment of adults aged 18 to 44 in these populations.

Catalogue number: Catalogue number: 11-629-x

Issue number: 2015008

November 2013

Statistics: 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey - Transcription

Education and Employment: Description of Visuals

New data from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey provide insight into why off-reserve First Nations people, Inuit and Métis might stay in or drop out of school, how having an education affects their experiences with finding work and earning an income, and what their future educational aspirations may be.

Looking specifically at adults aged 18 to 44, a new study from this survey shows that nearly eight-in-ten Métis, more than seven-in-ten First Nations living off reserve, and just over four-in-ten Inuit had a high school diploma or its equivalent in 2012.

(Three pie charts show the percentage of high school graduates among Métis (77%), First Nations people (72%), and Inuit (42%) aged 18 to 44.)

There were common characteristics which seemed to be associated with success at school. For example, high school graduates reported that they had participated more often in activities outside of school hours and read books more frequently than those who had dropped out.

(A list of success factors is shown: "did extracurricular activities, read books, felt safe and happy at school, had support from school staff, had friends who were a positive influence, had a parent with a high school education and had a parent involved in school activities.")

Among those who did not finish high school, common reasons for dropping out included wanting to work, money problems, school problems, lack of interest and pregnancy and childcare responsibilities.

(A post-it is shown with the following text: "Reasons for dropping out: wanting to work, money problems, school problems, lack of interest and pregnancy and childcare responsibilities.")

Nevertheless, many of those who did not complete high school still went on to get a post-secondary education, that is, to earn a trades certificate, college diploma or university degree.

(The proportion of those who did not complete high school but still went on to get a postsecondary education is shown for First Nations people (16%), Inuit (12%), and Métis (16%) aged 18 to 44.)

More education often means an easier time finding work and higher earnings. As with the general population, First Nations people, Inuit and Métis who had finished high school were more likely to be employed than those who had not finished high school.

(Three pie charts show the employment rates among high school graduates for First Nations people (72%), Inuit (71%) and Métis (80%) aged 18 to 44.)

The study also found that employment income ranges were generally $10,000 to $20,000 higher for adults who had completed high school than for those who had dropped out.

(Median employment income ranges for high school graduates and those who did not complete high school among First Nations people, Inuit and Métis aged 18 to 44 are shown. For First Nations people, range is shown as $20,000 to $30,000 if they did not complete high school, and $30,000 to $40,000 if they completed high school. For Inuit, range is shown as $10,000 to $20,000 if they did not complete high school, and $30,000 to $40,000 if they completed high school. For Métis, range is shown as $20,000 to $30,000 if they did not complete high school and, $30,000 to $40,000 if they completed high school.)

Whether they were working or unemployed many adults said that they were planning to go back to school. As of 2012, 65% of off-reserve First Nations people, 55% of Inuit and 59% of Métis, between the ages of 18 and 44, had plans to further their education.

(Three pie charts show the proportion of First Nations people (65%), Inuit (55%) and Métis (59%) aged 18 to 44 with plans to go back to school.)

Thank you for watching this quick overview of selected findings of the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

In addition to the topics of education and employment, language, income, housing and mobility, for respondents aged 6 and older.

Visit the Statistics Canada website to read the complete study and to learn more about the survey.

(The Web address www.statcan.gc.ca/aboriginalpeoples is shown.)

(The image fades into the Canada wordmark against a black background.)

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