Statistics by subject – Health

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All (11)

All (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Public use microdata: 82F0001X
    Description:

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) uses the Labour Force Survey sampling frame to draw a sample of approximately 22,000 households. The sample is distributed over four quarterly collection periods. In each household, some limited information is collected from all household members and one person, aged 12 years and over, in each household is randomly selected for a more in-depth interview.

    The questionnaire includes content related to health status, use of health services, determinants of health and a range of demographic and economic information. For example, the health status information includes self-perception of health, a health status index, chronic conditions, and activity restrictions. The use of health services is probed through visits to health care providers, both traditional and non-traditional, and the use of drugs and other medications. Health determinants include smoking, alcohol use, physical activity and in the first survey, emphasis has been placed on the collection of selected psycho-social factors that may influence health, such as stress, self-esteem and social support. The demographic and economic information includes age, sex, education, ethnicity, household income and labour force status.

    Release date: 1995-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950022506
    Description:

    Using data from Statistics Canada's 1988 and 1993 General Social Survey (GSS), this article examines the incidence and consequences of accidents in Canada and the characteristics of respondents aged 15 and over who were involved in them. In 1993, an estimated 3.9 million Canadians reported that they had been involved in 4.8 million accidents in the previous 12 months. Motor vehicle accidents and sports accidents were the most frequent, each accounting for about 27% of incidents, followed by accidents at work (21%) and at home (14%). Accidents were most common among young people, particularly men. However, from 1988 to 1993, there was a decline in the proportion of adults reporting accidents, and the sharpest drop was for the age group most at risk - 15-to 24-year-olds. Most of the downturn was attributable to a decrease in the motor vehicle accident rate. Since alcohol is known to be associated with accidents, reduced consumption during the same period may have been partly responsible for the decline in accident rates. Other factors that may have contributed include stricter enforcement of impaired driving legislation and speeds limits, and improvements in automobile safety. Nonetheless, despite the decline in accidents rates, the toll taken by accidents reported in 1993 was considerable: 80% of accidents caused personal injury, and almost half of these resulted in medical attention in a hospital. Overall, 62% of accidents resulted in activity-loss days, and 29% involved bed-disability days. Hospital utilization costs associated with these accidents in 1993 were about $1.5 billion. As well, about one-third of accidents involved out-of-pocket expenses, totalling $791 million. Moreover, accidents continue to be the leading cause of death among persons under age 44.

    Release date: 1995-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950022507
    Description:

    Indicators based on the registration of vital events are used to determine the health status of populations. The need for these indicators at the regional and community levels has grown with the trend toward decentralization in the delivery of health services. Such indicators are important because they affect funding and the types of service that are provided. Health status indicators tend to be associated with variables such as the level of urbanization or socioeconomic status. According to four indicators - mortality ratios for all causes of death, mortality ratios for external causes of death, infant mortality ratios, and low birth weight live birth ratios - some areas of British Columbia, specifically along the border with Alberta, have relatively good health, although the characteristics of these regions suggest that this should not be the case. However, a much different picture emerges when vital event data registered in Alberta for residents of these areas of British Columbia are considered. This article shows that for adequate health planning and program implementation, some communities need data from neighbouring provinces. It illustrates the effect of incorporating Alberta data into the development of health status indicators for British Columbia. It also suggests that similar adjustments may be necessary for data compiled in other provinces.

    Release date: 1995-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950022508
    Description:

    The positive relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and longevity has long been established. Comparable evidence exists for SES and morbidity, but observations of this relationship tend to be limited to specific health indicators. In this article, a comprehensive quantitative measure of health status, the Health Utility Index (HUI), is applied to an analysis of the relationship between SES the health status of people aged 25 and over in Ontario. The HUI, based on a set of questions included in the 1990 Ontario Health Survey (OHS), provides a summary index of the health of each respondent. The OHS data show that lower levels of education, income, and occupation are associated with lower HUI values. Health status differences across SES groups are greater in late middle-age than at younger or older ages, a pattern consistent with the findings of other studies. The development of summary indicators like the HUI is part of a larger effort to construct measures for monitoring the health of Canadians.

    Release date: 1995-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950011663
    Description:

    This article examines national and regional trends in mortality and morbidity due to abdominal aortic aneurysms from 1969 to 1991. Annual age-adjusted mortality and hospital separation rates were calculated for men and women aged 55 and older whose underlying cause of death was abdominal aortic aneurysm, or who were hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm. In recent decades, abdominal aortic aneurysm mortality rates remained stable, in contrast to substantial declines in mortality rates for cerebrovascular disease and cardiovascular disease. The pattern was similar for both sexes, although rates were four to five times higher among men than among women. In 1991, age-adjusted rates were around 31.0 per 100,000 men aged 55 and over and 8.5 per 100,000 women aged 55 and over. Over the 1969 to 1991 period mortality rates in all regions tended to coverage. Although mortality rates were stable, hospital separation rates for abdominal aortic aneurysms increased sharply, particularly for unruptured aneurysms. Screening programs have been able to detect asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms, and surgical intervention can substantially reduce mortality. However, the costs and benefits of screnning programs should be assessed. If current mortality rates persist, as the baby boom ages there will be an absolute increase in the number of deaths from abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Release date: 1995-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950011665
    Description:

    Between 1992 and 1993, the life expectancy at birth of Canadians fell slightly, from 78.06 to 77.95 years. This decline reflected an unusually sharp upturn in the number of deaths in 1993, which was attributable, to some extent, to an influenza outbreak in early spring that year, and to substantial increases in tobaccorelated deaths among women. The overall decline in life expectancy occurred in every province except Nova Scotia, and affected both sexes, although it was more pronounced among females.

    Release date: 1995-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950011664
    Description:

    In the early 1990s, Canadians were less likely to be hospitalized than they had been a decade before. And when they did enter hospital, their stays tended to be shorter. As well, hospitalization for surgical procedures was less frequent and required less time in hospital.

    Nonetheless, a few patterns persisted throughout the decade. Females were more likely than males to be admitted to hospital - largely a reflection of obstetrical procedures - but females' average length of stay was slightly less than that of male patients. However, with advancing age, the likelihood of hospitalization and the duration of stays increased for both sexes.

    Release date: 1995-07-27

  • Public use microdata: 82M0008X
    Description:

    The survey, begun in February 1994, monitors the smoking patterns of Canadians over a 12 month period and to measure any changes in smoking resulting from the decrease in taxes in cigarettes which took place in February 1994 in some provinces. It is related to MDF 82M0006. Updates are included in the microdata file price. A guide for this microdata file is available.

    Release date: 1995-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950021600
    Description:

    Lack of sleep is not the only cause of daytime sleepiness; many other things can induce it, including excessive warmth, boredom, or performing a demanding but uninteresting task. This study measures tiredness based on respondent assessment of drowsiness during working hours.

    Release date: 1995-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011777
    Description:

    During the last decade, time lost from work because of illness or disability declined, while days lost as a result of personal or family responsibilities increased. This study examines rates and levels by industry.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89F0029X
    Description:

    The Bibliographic employment equity database is an annotated bibliography of available research and studies containing employment equity data related to the four designated groups covered by the Employment Equity Act: Aboriginal Peoples, Persons with Disabilities, Visible Minorities and Women. The research and studies included were published in 1982 or later, refer to Canadian data and include statistical data or analysis of data.

    Release date: 1995-02-28

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Public use microdata: 82F0001X
    Description:

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) uses the Labour Force Survey sampling frame to draw a sample of approximately 22,000 households. The sample is distributed over four quarterly collection periods. In each household, some limited information is collected from all household members and one person, aged 12 years and over, in each household is randomly selected for a more in-depth interview.

    The questionnaire includes content related to health status, use of health services, determinants of health and a range of demographic and economic information. For example, the health status information includes self-perception of health, a health status index, chronic conditions, and activity restrictions. The use of health services is probed through visits to health care providers, both traditional and non-traditional, and the use of drugs and other medications. Health determinants include smoking, alcohol use, physical activity and in the first survey, emphasis has been placed on the collection of selected psycho-social factors that may influence health, such as stress, self-esteem and social support. The demographic and economic information includes age, sex, education, ethnicity, household income and labour force status.

    Release date: 1995-11-21

  • Public use microdata: 82M0008X
    Description:

    The survey, begun in February 1994, monitors the smoking patterns of Canadians over a 12 month period and to measure any changes in smoking resulting from the decrease in taxes in cigarettes which took place in February 1994 in some provinces. It is related to MDF 82M0006. Updates are included in the microdata file price. A guide for this microdata file is available.

    Release date: 1995-06-08

Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950022506
    Description:

    Using data from Statistics Canada's 1988 and 1993 General Social Survey (GSS), this article examines the incidence and consequences of accidents in Canada and the characteristics of respondents aged 15 and over who were involved in them. In 1993, an estimated 3.9 million Canadians reported that they had been involved in 4.8 million accidents in the previous 12 months. Motor vehicle accidents and sports accidents were the most frequent, each accounting for about 27% of incidents, followed by accidents at work (21%) and at home (14%). Accidents were most common among young people, particularly men. However, from 1988 to 1993, there was a decline in the proportion of adults reporting accidents, and the sharpest drop was for the age group most at risk - 15-to 24-year-olds. Most of the downturn was attributable to a decrease in the motor vehicle accident rate. Since alcohol is known to be associated with accidents, reduced consumption during the same period may have been partly responsible for the decline in accident rates. Other factors that may have contributed include stricter enforcement of impaired driving legislation and speeds limits, and improvements in automobile safety. Nonetheless, despite the decline in accidents rates, the toll taken by accidents reported in 1993 was considerable: 80% of accidents caused personal injury, and almost half of these resulted in medical attention in a hospital. Overall, 62% of accidents resulted in activity-loss days, and 29% involved bed-disability days. Hospital utilization costs associated with these accidents in 1993 were about $1.5 billion. As well, about one-third of accidents involved out-of-pocket expenses, totalling $791 million. Moreover, accidents continue to be the leading cause of death among persons under age 44.

    Release date: 1995-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950022507
    Description:

    Indicators based on the registration of vital events are used to determine the health status of populations. The need for these indicators at the regional and community levels has grown with the trend toward decentralization in the delivery of health services. Such indicators are important because they affect funding and the types of service that are provided. Health status indicators tend to be associated with variables such as the level of urbanization or socioeconomic status. According to four indicators - mortality ratios for all causes of death, mortality ratios for external causes of death, infant mortality ratios, and low birth weight live birth ratios - some areas of British Columbia, specifically along the border with Alberta, have relatively good health, although the characteristics of these regions suggest that this should not be the case. However, a much different picture emerges when vital event data registered in Alberta for residents of these areas of British Columbia are considered. This article shows that for adequate health planning and program implementation, some communities need data from neighbouring provinces. It illustrates the effect of incorporating Alberta data into the development of health status indicators for British Columbia. It also suggests that similar adjustments may be necessary for data compiled in other provinces.

    Release date: 1995-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950022508
    Description:

    The positive relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and longevity has long been established. Comparable evidence exists for SES and morbidity, but observations of this relationship tend to be limited to specific health indicators. In this article, a comprehensive quantitative measure of health status, the Health Utility Index (HUI), is applied to an analysis of the relationship between SES the health status of people aged 25 and over in Ontario. The HUI, based on a set of questions included in the 1990 Ontario Health Survey (OHS), provides a summary index of the health of each respondent. The OHS data show that lower levels of education, income, and occupation are associated with lower HUI values. Health status differences across SES groups are greater in late middle-age than at younger or older ages, a pattern consistent with the findings of other studies. The development of summary indicators like the HUI is part of a larger effort to construct measures for monitoring the health of Canadians.

    Release date: 1995-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950011663
    Description:

    This article examines national and regional trends in mortality and morbidity due to abdominal aortic aneurysms from 1969 to 1991. Annual age-adjusted mortality and hospital separation rates were calculated for men and women aged 55 and older whose underlying cause of death was abdominal aortic aneurysm, or who were hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm. In recent decades, abdominal aortic aneurysm mortality rates remained stable, in contrast to substantial declines in mortality rates for cerebrovascular disease and cardiovascular disease. The pattern was similar for both sexes, although rates were four to five times higher among men than among women. In 1991, age-adjusted rates were around 31.0 per 100,000 men aged 55 and over and 8.5 per 100,000 women aged 55 and over. Over the 1969 to 1991 period mortality rates in all regions tended to coverage. Although mortality rates were stable, hospital separation rates for abdominal aortic aneurysms increased sharply, particularly for unruptured aneurysms. Screening programs have been able to detect asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms, and surgical intervention can substantially reduce mortality. However, the costs and benefits of screnning programs should be assessed. If current mortality rates persist, as the baby boom ages there will be an absolute increase in the number of deaths from abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Release date: 1995-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950011665
    Description:

    Between 1992 and 1993, the life expectancy at birth of Canadians fell slightly, from 78.06 to 77.95 years. This decline reflected an unusually sharp upturn in the number of deaths in 1993, which was attributable, to some extent, to an influenza outbreak in early spring that year, and to substantial increases in tobaccorelated deaths among women. The overall decline in life expectancy occurred in every province except Nova Scotia, and affected both sexes, although it was more pronounced among females.

    Release date: 1995-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950011664
    Description:

    In the early 1990s, Canadians were less likely to be hospitalized than they had been a decade before. And when they did enter hospital, their stays tended to be shorter. As well, hospitalization for surgical procedures was less frequent and required less time in hospital.

    Nonetheless, a few patterns persisted throughout the decade. Females were more likely than males to be admitted to hospital - largely a reflection of obstetrical procedures - but females' average length of stay was slightly less than that of male patients. However, with advancing age, the likelihood of hospitalization and the duration of stays increased for both sexes.

    Release date: 1995-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950021600
    Description:

    Lack of sleep is not the only cause of daytime sleepiness; many other things can induce it, including excessive warmth, boredom, or performing a demanding but uninteresting task. This study measures tiredness based on respondent assessment of drowsiness during working hours.

    Release date: 1995-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011777
    Description:

    During the last decade, time lost from work because of illness or disability declined, while days lost as a result of personal or family responsibilities increased. This study examines rates and levels by industry.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89F0029X
    Description:

    The Bibliographic employment equity database is an annotated bibliography of available research and studies containing employment equity data related to the four designated groups covered by the Employment Equity Act: Aboriginal Peoples, Persons with Disabilities, Visible Minorities and Women. The research and studies included were published in 1982 or later, refer to Canadian data and include statistical data or analysis of data.

    Release date: 1995-02-28

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