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All (32)

All (32) (25 of 32 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20020009228
    Description:

    This study identifies determinants that promote dependence-free aging, an important topic as the large cohorts of baby-boomers grow older.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Table: 89-577-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities may be limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS Survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private and some collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data was collected after the 2001 Census, in the fall of 2001.

    This paper presents initial results on the number of persons with disabilities, disability rates as well as the type and severity of disability, by age and sex, for Canada and the provinces.

    Release date: 2003-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S2003000
    Description:

    Growing up Healthy? is the fourth report in the Statistics Canada series, How Healthy Are Canadians? It contains articles that examine the conditions that impede, as well as those that enhance, children's potential to "grow up healthy."

    Factors related to adolescents' self-perceived health identifies issues other than illness that are linked to less favourable ratings of health. For example, the roles of obesity, smoking, physical inactivity and heavy drinking are examined.

    Parent and child factors associated with youth obesity investigates behaviours, circumstances and parental characteristics that relate to obesity in adolescents. Differences between boys and girls, which may reflect gender-specific social pressures and responses to such pressures, are also explored.

    Sedentary children who become activefocuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Adolescent self-concept and health into adulthood studies links between self-worth and sense of control in adolescence, and mental and physical health over the next several years. Health outcomes in young adulthood are analyzed in relation to positive and negative self-concept in adolescence, and differences between the sexes are highlighted.

    Witnessing violence - anxiety and aggression in young children focuses on children who were aged 4 to 7 in 1994, and examines levels of anxiety and aggression in the short- and longer-term in relation to their exposure to violence in the home.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X2003101
    Description:

    Growing up Healthy? is the fourth report in the Statistics Canada series, How Healthy Are Canadians? It contains articles that examine the conditions that impede, as well as those that enhance, children's potential to "grow up healthy."

    Factors related to adolescents' self-perceived health identifies issues other than illness that are linked to less favourable ratings of health. For example, the roles of obesity, smoking, physical inactivity and heavy drinking are examined.

    Parent and child factors associated with youth obesity investigates behaviours, circumstances and parental characteristics that relate to obesity in adolescents. Differences between boys and girls, which may reflect gender-specific social pressures and responses to such pressures, are also explored.

    Sedentary children who become activefocuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Adolescent self-concept and health into adulthood studies links between self-worth and sense of control in adolescence, and mental and physical health over the next several years. Health outcomes in young adulthood are analyzed in relation to positive and negative self-concept in adolescence, and differences between the sexes are highlighted.

    Witnessing violence - anxiety and aggression in young children focuses on children who were aged 4 to 7 in 1994, and examines levels of anxiety and aggression in the short- and longer-term in relation to their exposure to violence in the home.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006674
    Description:

    Identifies issues other than illness that are linked to less favourable ratings of health. For example, the roles of obesity, smoking, physical inactivity and heavy drinking are examined.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006679
    Description:

    This article investigates behaviours, circumstances and parental characteristics that relate to obesity in adolescents. Differences between boys and girls, which may reflect gender-specific social pressures and responses to such pressures, are also explored.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006693
    Description:

    This article focuses on children who were aged 4 to 7 in 1994, and examines levels of anxiety and aggression in relation to their exposure to violence in the home. The evidence that emerges of the short- and longer-term effects on their behaviour and emotions is compelling.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006681
    Description:

    This article focuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002006
    Description:

    The health of Canada's rural people has gained increased attention over the past few years as studies have shown that the health status of those living in rural and remote regions of Canada is lagging behind that of urban residents. The objective of this analysis is to compare a number of key health indicators between rural and urban regions in Canada to determine if the type of region in which a person lives is associated with the health of the population

    The analysis for this report is based on data acquired from Statistic Canada's 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey. The survey population is segmented into four types of metropolitan regions (large metro-central, large metro-fringe, mid-sized metro and small metro) and four types of non-metropolitan regions (small cities, towns, rural and northern).

    This study finds that the self-rated health of Canadians (those reporting their health as excellent) declines from the most urban regions of the nation to the most rural and remote parts. The research points to personal health risk factors including being overweight (i.e., high body mass index) and smoking as being significantly higher in small town regions, rural regions and northern regions of Canada. In addition, the northern regions of Canada show a significantly higher than average share of the population who have high blood pressure or suffer from major depressive episodes. Rural regions (non-metro-adjacent) and small metropolitan regions have a higher than average prevalence of arthritis/rheumatism, even after standardizing for age.

    Release date: 2003-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20030016643
    Description:

    The Classification and Measurement System for Functional Health (CLAMES) is a generic tool developed by the Health Analysis and Measurement Group of Statistics Canada to quantify the health-related quality of life associated with diseases and injuries.

    This comprehensive tool permits comparable description and classification of health states covering a broad range of severity levels and symptoms. It can be used to compare the impact of disease or injury in a population, to monitor population health over time, and to identify disparities among socio-demographic groups.

    Like existing generic tools such as the Health Utilities Index (HUI 3), the EuroQol five dimensions index (EQ-5D) and the SF-36 Health Status Questionnaire, CLAMES measures health status and health-related quality of life. CLAMES combines the attributes used in these tools so that we can characterize diseases and injuries across all aspects of health - physical, mental, and social.

    Release date: 2003-09-29

  • Table: 89-587-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 35, 000 adults (aged 15 and over) and 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in private or collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves, and in the Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut were excluded from the survey. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, in the fall of 2001.

    These tables contain data on the educational attainment, labour force activity and income of adults with and without disabilities.

    Release date: 2003-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020046595
    Description:

    More than half of dependent seniors living in the community received help from informal sources only, and around a quarter relied exclusively on formal help. For those getting both types of assistance, increased hours from formal sources did not significantly reduce the hours received from informal sources.

    Release date: 2003-08-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020046594
    Description:

    In 2000/01, 10% of Canadians aged 20 or older, an estimated 2.3 million, reported having had a repetitive strain injury (RSI) in the past 12 months. Work-related activities were most often the cause. People with RSIs had more contact with health care professionals and higher levels of chronic pain and psychological distress than did those without an RSI.

    Release date: 2003-08-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020046596
    Description:

    The impact of chronic conditions on health status varies at different ages. At younger ages, urinary incontinence and arthritis/rheumatism significantly compromise health-related quality of life, while at older ages, Alzheimer's disease and stroke have the greatest effect.

    Release date: 2003-08-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-585-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves, and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    Using the PALS data, this article describes the lives of children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.

    Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to formal and informal help;-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and-household income.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Table: 89-586-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered " Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories or Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    These tables contain PALS data on children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to help; formal and informal-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and household income.

    Tables are presented by severity of disability of children with disabilities, for Canada and provinces.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20020036573
    Description:

    This analysis integrates data for age at smoking initiation, smoking patterns (ever/never smokers), and number of cigarettes smoked by age and gender from 13 Canadian population-based health surveys. Data for cohorts of individuals born between 1910 and 1985 were combined into a single dataset to analyze changes in smoking behaviour.The proportion of males and females who stated that they were current smokers declined considerably over the years; the proportion labelling themselves as former smokers has increased; and recent cohorts are smoking fewer cigarettes than those born earlier in the century. Although prevalence rates vary across birth cohorts, the pattern of use within each cohort is fairly similar, peaking during the middle years.Females are now starting to smoke at a much younger age than females born early in the twentieth century. Males are starting at a slightly younger age than in earlier cohorts. Since the first survey, more males than females have consistently stated that they were current smokers, although this gap has closed over time. The most recent survey data suggest that the gender gap for age at initiation and smoking rates is now very modest.This analysis contributes information about smoking patterns over time to a large integrative framework about population health in Canada: the Population Health Impact of Disease, Injury, and Health Determinants in Canada (PHI).

    Release date: 2003-07-10

  • Table: 84-601-X20030026684
    Description:

    The annual Cancer Incidence in Canada tables provide information on the number of new cases and rates of cancer tumours and patients from 1992 onwards by five-year age-groups and sex for all Canadian provinces and territories as well as information on the primary ICD-O-3 sites of cancer.

    Release date: 2003-07-03

  • Table: 84-601-X20030027833
    Description:

    The Cancer Survival Statistics tables provide site-specific five-year observed and relative survival estimates for cases diagnosed from 1992 onwards (colorectal, lung, prostate and female breast cancer cases only). In addition to age-specific and age-standardized national (excl. Quebec) estimates, all ages (15 to 99 years) and age-standardized provincial estimates are available.

    Release date: 2003-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016532
    Description:

    This article provides an up-to-date profile of shift workers and studies their physical and mental health.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020036557
    Description:

    After rising in the early 1990s, prostate cancer incidence rates have fallen. Mortality rates from the disease decreased among men aged 60 or older, but are little changed among younger men. In 2000/01, about four in 10 men aged 40 or older reported having had a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test.

    Release date: 2003-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020036599
    Description:

    In 2000/01, 4.5% of Canadians aged 18 or older, an estimated 1.1 million, had diabetes. Advancing age, family history, sedentary leisure time and excess weight were associated with developing the disease.

    Release date: 2003-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020036598
    Description:

    Among senior men, but not women, being married and participating in organizations were each independently predictive of survival over the six years from 1994/95 to 2000/01.

    Release date: 2003-05-23

  • Table: 89-580-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a physical condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private or collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data were collected in the fall of 2001.

    This paper focuses on the various supports available for adults with disabilities. These supports include technical aids and devices, assistance with everyday activities, housing modifications and tax credits.

    Release date: 2003-03-25

  • Table: 89-581-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children who are limited because of a physical condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private or collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data were collected in the fall of 2001.

    These tables contain data on the use of and need for supports for adults with disabilities, by sex and age groups, for Canada and the provinces.

    Note: For a detailed analysis, please see the document A Profile of Disability in Canada, 2001 (Catalogue no. 89-577-XIE).

    Release date: 2003-03-25

Data (8)

Data (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Table: 89-577-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities may be limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS Survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private and some collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data was collected after the 2001 Census, in the fall of 2001.

    This paper presents initial results on the number of persons with disabilities, disability rates as well as the type and severity of disability, by age and sex, for Canada and the provinces.

    Release date: 2003-12-19

  • Table: 89-587-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 35, 000 adults (aged 15 and over) and 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in private or collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves, and in the Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut were excluded from the survey. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, in the fall of 2001.

    These tables contain data on the educational attainment, labour force activity and income of adults with and without disabilities.

    Release date: 2003-09-11

  • Table: 89-586-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered " Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories or Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    These tables contain PALS data on children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to help; formal and informal-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and household income.

    Tables are presented by severity of disability of children with disabilities, for Canada and provinces.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Table: 84-601-X20030026684
    Description:

    The annual Cancer Incidence in Canada tables provide information on the number of new cases and rates of cancer tumours and patients from 1992 onwards by five-year age-groups and sex for all Canadian provinces and territories as well as information on the primary ICD-O-3 sites of cancer.

    Release date: 2003-07-03

  • Table: 84-601-X20030027833
    Description:

    The Cancer Survival Statistics tables provide site-specific five-year observed and relative survival estimates for cases diagnosed from 1992 onwards (colorectal, lung, prostate and female breast cancer cases only). In addition to age-specific and age-standardized national (excl. Quebec) estimates, all ages (15 to 99 years) and age-standardized provincial estimates are available.

    Release date: 2003-07-03

  • Table: 89-580-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a physical condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private or collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data were collected in the fall of 2001.

    This paper focuses on the various supports available for adults with disabilities. These supports include technical aids and devices, assistance with everyday activities, housing modifications and tax credits.

    Release date: 2003-03-25

  • Table: 89-581-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children who are limited because of a physical condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private or collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data were collected in the fall of 2001.

    These tables contain data on the use of and need for supports for adults with disabilities, by sex and age groups, for Canada and the provinces.

    Note: For a detailed analysis, please see the document A Profile of Disability in Canada, 2001 (Catalogue no. 89-577-XIE).

    Release date: 2003-03-25

  • Table: 82-577-X
    Description:

    Optional content to the Canadian Community Health Survey was negotiated by some provinces or territories and for some health regions. The data from that content provide information on the following variables: self esteem, mastery, alcohol dependence, sedentary activities, changes made to improve health, decision latitude at work, home care utilization, social support, influenza immunization, bicycle-helmet use, condom use, tobacco alternatives, smoking cessation aids, physical check-up, eye examination, dental visits, breast examinations and breast self-examinations, blood pressure check, suicidal thoughts and attempts, distress, moods, and spirituality.

    Related tables to the Canadian Community Health Survey provide information on the following variables: unmet health-care needs, prostate-specific antigen and former smokers.

    Release date: 2003-03-03

Analysis (24)

Analysis (24) (24 of 24 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20020009228
    Description:

    This study identifies determinants that promote dependence-free aging, an important topic as the large cohorts of baby-boomers grow older.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S2003000
    Description:

    Growing up Healthy? is the fourth report in the Statistics Canada series, How Healthy Are Canadians? It contains articles that examine the conditions that impede, as well as those that enhance, children's potential to "grow up healthy."

    Factors related to adolescents' self-perceived health identifies issues other than illness that are linked to less favourable ratings of health. For example, the roles of obesity, smoking, physical inactivity and heavy drinking are examined.

    Parent and child factors associated with youth obesity investigates behaviours, circumstances and parental characteristics that relate to obesity in adolescents. Differences between boys and girls, which may reflect gender-specific social pressures and responses to such pressures, are also explored.

    Sedentary children who become activefocuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Adolescent self-concept and health into adulthood studies links between self-worth and sense of control in adolescence, and mental and physical health over the next several years. Health outcomes in young adulthood are analyzed in relation to positive and negative self-concept in adolescence, and differences between the sexes are highlighted.

    Witnessing violence - anxiety and aggression in young children focuses on children who were aged 4 to 7 in 1994, and examines levels of anxiety and aggression in the short- and longer-term in relation to their exposure to violence in the home.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X2003101
    Description:

    Growing up Healthy? is the fourth report in the Statistics Canada series, How Healthy Are Canadians? It contains articles that examine the conditions that impede, as well as those that enhance, children's potential to "grow up healthy."

    Factors related to adolescents' self-perceived health identifies issues other than illness that are linked to less favourable ratings of health. For example, the roles of obesity, smoking, physical inactivity and heavy drinking are examined.

    Parent and child factors associated with youth obesity investigates behaviours, circumstances and parental characteristics that relate to obesity in adolescents. Differences between boys and girls, which may reflect gender-specific social pressures and responses to such pressures, are also explored.

    Sedentary children who become activefocuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Adolescent self-concept and health into adulthood studies links between self-worth and sense of control in adolescence, and mental and physical health over the next several years. Health outcomes in young adulthood are analyzed in relation to positive and negative self-concept in adolescence, and differences between the sexes are highlighted.

    Witnessing violence - anxiety and aggression in young children focuses on children who were aged 4 to 7 in 1994, and examines levels of anxiety and aggression in the short- and longer-term in relation to their exposure to violence in the home.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006674
    Description:

    Identifies issues other than illness that are linked to less favourable ratings of health. For example, the roles of obesity, smoking, physical inactivity and heavy drinking are examined.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006679
    Description:

    This article investigates behaviours, circumstances and parental characteristics that relate to obesity in adolescents. Differences between boys and girls, which may reflect gender-specific social pressures and responses to such pressures, are also explored.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006693
    Description:

    This article focuses on children who were aged 4 to 7 in 1994, and examines levels of anxiety and aggression in relation to their exposure to violence in the home. The evidence that emerges of the short- and longer-term effects on their behaviour and emotions is compelling.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006681
    Description:

    This article focuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002006
    Description:

    The health of Canada's rural people has gained increased attention over the past few years as studies have shown that the health status of those living in rural and remote regions of Canada is lagging behind that of urban residents. The objective of this analysis is to compare a number of key health indicators between rural and urban regions in Canada to determine if the type of region in which a person lives is associated with the health of the population

    The analysis for this report is based on data acquired from Statistic Canada's 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey. The survey population is segmented into four types of metropolitan regions (large metro-central, large metro-fringe, mid-sized metro and small metro) and four types of non-metropolitan regions (small cities, towns, rural and northern).

    This study finds that the self-rated health of Canadians (those reporting their health as excellent) declines from the most urban regions of the nation to the most rural and remote parts. The research points to personal health risk factors including being overweight (i.e., high body mass index) and smoking as being significantly higher in small town regions, rural regions and northern regions of Canada. In addition, the northern regions of Canada show a significantly higher than average share of the population who have high blood pressure or suffer from major depressive episodes. Rural regions (non-metro-adjacent) and small metropolitan regions have a higher than average prevalence of arthritis/rheumatism, even after standardizing for age.

    Release date: 2003-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20030016643
    Description:

    The Classification and Measurement System for Functional Health (CLAMES) is a generic tool developed by the Health Analysis and Measurement Group of Statistics Canada to quantify the health-related quality of life associated with diseases and injuries.

    This comprehensive tool permits comparable description and classification of health states covering a broad range of severity levels and symptoms. It can be used to compare the impact of disease or injury in a population, to monitor population health over time, and to identify disparities among socio-demographic groups.

    Like existing generic tools such as the Health Utilities Index (HUI 3), the EuroQol five dimensions index (EQ-5D) and the SF-36 Health Status Questionnaire, CLAMES measures health status and health-related quality of life. CLAMES combines the attributes used in these tools so that we can characterize diseases and injuries across all aspects of health - physical, mental, and social.

    Release date: 2003-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020046595
    Description:

    More than half of dependent seniors living in the community received help from informal sources only, and around a quarter relied exclusively on formal help. For those getting both types of assistance, increased hours from formal sources did not significantly reduce the hours received from informal sources.

    Release date: 2003-08-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020046594
    Description:

    In 2000/01, 10% of Canadians aged 20 or older, an estimated 2.3 million, reported having had a repetitive strain injury (RSI) in the past 12 months. Work-related activities were most often the cause. People with RSIs had more contact with health care professionals and higher levels of chronic pain and psychological distress than did those without an RSI.

    Release date: 2003-08-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020046596
    Description:

    The impact of chronic conditions on health status varies at different ages. At younger ages, urinary incontinence and arthritis/rheumatism significantly compromise health-related quality of life, while at older ages, Alzheimer's disease and stroke have the greatest effect.

    Release date: 2003-08-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-585-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves, and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    Using the PALS data, this article describes the lives of children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.

    Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to formal and informal help;-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and-household income.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20020036573
    Description:

    This analysis integrates data for age at smoking initiation, smoking patterns (ever/never smokers), and number of cigarettes smoked by age and gender from 13 Canadian population-based health surveys. Data for cohorts of individuals born between 1910 and 1985 were combined into a single dataset to analyze changes in smoking behaviour.The proportion of males and females who stated that they were current smokers declined considerably over the years; the proportion labelling themselves as former smokers has increased; and recent cohorts are smoking fewer cigarettes than those born earlier in the century. Although prevalence rates vary across birth cohorts, the pattern of use within each cohort is fairly similar, peaking during the middle years.Females are now starting to smoke at a much younger age than females born early in the twentieth century. Males are starting at a slightly younger age than in earlier cohorts. Since the first survey, more males than females have consistently stated that they were current smokers, although this gap has closed over time. The most recent survey data suggest that the gender gap for age at initiation and smoking rates is now very modest.This analysis contributes information about smoking patterns over time to a large integrative framework about population health in Canada: the Population Health Impact of Disease, Injury, and Health Determinants in Canada (PHI).

    Release date: 2003-07-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016532
    Description:

    This article provides an up-to-date profile of shift workers and studies their physical and mental health.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020036557
    Description:

    After rising in the early 1990s, prostate cancer incidence rates have fallen. Mortality rates from the disease decreased among men aged 60 or older, but are little changed among younger men. In 2000/01, about four in 10 men aged 40 or older reported having had a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test.

    Release date: 2003-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020036599
    Description:

    In 2000/01, 4.5% of Canadians aged 18 or older, an estimated 1.1 million, had diabetes. Advancing age, family history, sedentary leisure time and excess weight were associated with developing the disease.

    Release date: 2003-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020036598
    Description:

    Among senior men, but not women, being married and participating in organizations were each independently predictive of survival over the six years from 1994/95 to 2000/01.

    Release date: 2003-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046494
    Description:

    This article looks at those forced to cope with difficult personal events like the serious illness or injury of a close friend, family member or themselves; the death of a family member or close friend; or someone leaving (or moving into) their home, including the birth of a child or a new relationship.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20020026480
    Description:

    For the first time, detailed information regarding the experiences of Canadians when they access health care services is available at the national level. The results of the Health Services Access Survey revealed that almost 20% of those who obtained first contact services (for self or family member) for routine care, health information or advice or immediate care for a minor health problem reported difficulties accessing these services. About 20% of those seeking specialized services (for self) reported difficulties, the majority citing lengthy waits as a primary barrier to care. Waits for surgery varied by type of surgery. Variations in waiting times by type of service warrant further investigation to assess how current services are meeting the needs of Canadians. This survey provides valuable information regarding the views and experiences of Canadians about waiting for care. These initial data provide a starting point for examination of access to health care services in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020026435
    Description:

    People who began daily smoking in adolescence were at increased risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis, even when education, household income and cigarette consumption were taken into account.

    Release date: 2003-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020026437
    Description:

    Self-reports of prescription drug insurance coverage reflect substantial under-reporting among seniors and social recipients-respondents who were eligible for publicly funded provincial benefits.

    Release date: 2003-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020026436
    Description:

    This study examines the association of neighbourhood low income and income inequality with individual health outcomes in Toronto, Canada's largest census metropolitan area.

    Release date: 2003-02-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-559-X
    Description:

    The policy and processes involving mentally disordered accused can be complex. Persons found unfit to stand trial, or not criminally responsible for their actions on account of a mental disorder, come into contact with both the health and justice systems. With the increasing availability over the past two to three decades of psychotropic medication for mentally disordered persons, the health system is now able to treat this group in a non-institutionalized setting. Similarly, dispositions made by the court, when the accused has been found either unfit to stand trial or else not criminally responsible for their actions, have shifted from indeterminate incarceration to minimal detention and community-based treatment. This document reviews the processes undertaken by persons identified as mentally disordered in court and identifies potential data-collection opportunities.

    Release date: 2003-01-30

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