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All (58)

All (58) (25 of 58 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154917
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey (JVWS) to examine the characteristics of long-term job vacancies, defined as positions for which recruitment efforts had been ongoing for 90 days or more on the day of the survey. Specifically, the study aims to answer the following questions: What is the prevalence of long-term job vacancies in Canada? How do these vacancies differ from other vacant jobs? Is there a link between the duration of the vacancy and the offered wage?

    Release date: 2018-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114826
    Description:

    Since 2007—prior to the economic downturn of 2008/2009—the overall labour force participation of Canadians declined by about two percentage points. The first part of the study investigates the extent to which aging affected changes in labour market participation rates since 2007, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). In the second part, the reasons behind the increase in the participation rates of Canadians aged 55 and over, which have been trending upwards since 1996, are explored.

    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114655
    Description:

    Based on a self-reported measure of overqualification, this article examines the association between overqualification and skills among workers aged 25 to 64 with a university degree, using data from the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). This article also examines the extent to which overqualified workers are dissatisfied with their jobs. Overqualified workers are defined in this study as university-educated workers who reported that they were in a job requiring no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2016-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114651
    Description:

    This study reports on the trends in the labour force participation rate (LFPR) of prime-aged women (25 to 54) in both Canada and the United States. The paper examines the population groups that have been behind the rising divergence in the LFPR between the two countries over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111915
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the proportion of employed people aged 25 to 34 with a university degree rose from 19% to 40% among women, and from 17% to 27% among men. Given the increase in the proportion of university graduates, did the occupational profile of young workers change over the period? This article examines long-term changes in the occupation profiles of young men and women, for both those who did and did not have a university degree. Changes in the share of women employed in these occupations are also examined.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111916
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the share of young people with a university degree increased significantly, as did the share of young workers employed in professional occupations. Nevertheless, many young university degree holders could still be considered 'overqualified'-working in occupations requiring lower levels of education. In this article, changes in overqualification among young graduates are examined over the period from 1991 to 2011.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111862
    Description:

    Absences from work can be expressed in terms of days lost per year, on the basis of Labour Force Survey data. In this In Brief, the new data on work absences for 2012 are introduced, and the differences between private and public sector employees' absences are examined in more detail.

    Release date: 2013-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111775
    Description:

    This study examines employment variations across industries during the recent labour market downturn and subsequent recovery, and examines the sectors that have been drivers of job growth since employment returned to pre-downturn levels.

    Release date: 2013-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111629
    Description:

    This article investigates the factors associated with voting during the May 2011 federal election. Voting rates are examined across personal, family and labour market characteristics. Multivariate techniques are used to account for many of the characteristics associated with voting. The study is based on several supplemental questions, commissioned by Elections Canada, that were added to the May Labour Force Survey. Voting trends and international comparisons, based on administrative data, are also presented.

    Release date: 2012-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411535
    Description:

    About 1 in 6 Canadian workers is self-employed. Does taking on the responsibility of a business result in greater earning potential? More wealth? Affect spending patterns? This paper uses a variety of data sources to examine how the self-employed differ from paid employees in income level and dispersion, wealth, retirement preparation and spending.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111410
    Description:

    The Canadian labour market recently experienced its most significant downturn since the 1990 - 1992 recession. Although employment rebounded more quickly than during the downturns of the early 1980s and early 1990s, the number of individuals without a job remains significantly higher than at the beginning of the downturn. This article investigates how various categories of non-workers grew in the past two years. It also discusses alternative measures of unemployment that include some of these categories in the calculations. Several of the alternative measures also include part-time workers who would prefer to work full time.

    Release date: 2011-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201011013258
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine whether offshorable service-sector occupations and other comparable occupations have displayed similar wage growth since the late 1990s. The analysis allows results to vary across service-sector occupations and worker characteristics.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010513249
    Description:

    Using data from the Labour Force Survey, this article examines the evolution of the employment rate and work hours of wives whose husbands suffered job loss during the last three labour market downturns: 1981 to 1983, 1990 to 1992 and 2008 to 2009.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010313245
    Description:

    During the recent employment downturn, self-employment was one source of employment growth. This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine the sources and characteristics of the recent increase in self-employment, the dynamics of entry into and exit out of self-employment, and to assess the extent to which those who lost paid jobs early in the recession might account for the subsequent surge in self-employment.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911211048
    Description:

    The Canadian labour market recently experienced its worst downturn since the recession of the early 1990s. Since employment last peaked in October 2008, employment declined by 2.3%, or 400,000 individuals. This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine variations in employment levels from October 2008 to October 2009 across a variety of personal and job characteristics. Comparisons are also made with earlier recessions and the U.S. labour market.

    Release date: 2010-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013237
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2005, parental work time increased by substantial margins, especially for families located at the bottom and in the middle of the earnings distribution. However, this increase occurred against a backdrop of a stronger increase in earnings for families at the top of the earnings distribution. This study finds that high earnings families earned more in 2005 than in 1980 for a given amount of parental work time, likely because of higher wages.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200901111023
    Description:

    A look at how the labour market changed between October 2008 and 2009.

    Release date: 2009-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910813235
    Description:

    Women's labour market participation has increased substantially over recent decades, creating challenges for families in balancing work-life responsibilities. The examination of family work patterns revealed significant differences in annual hours of work between families with and those without children.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910613231
    Description:

    Like the United States and the United Kingdom, Canada has a higher proportion of low-paid jobs than Australia and most countries in continental Europe. While the differences with continental Europe highlight different approaches to the labour market, the much lower rate of low-paid work in Australia is more puzzling since that country shares many similarities with Canada. Differences in wage-setting mechanisms appear to play a role in explaining the disparity in rates of low-paid jobs.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910113222
    Description:

    Traditional age-earnings profiles, based on cross-sectional data, typically follow an inverted U-shaped pattern with annual earnings peaking around middle age. With longitudinal data on hourly earnings, the picture changes considerably.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810913216
    Description:

    In 2007, the proportion of employed people in Canada was at its highest level in at least three decades, while the national unemployment rate sank to a 33-year low of 5.8%. However, manufacturing employment in Canada, as in the United States, has been on a downward trend. Between 2002 and 2007 employment rates increased the most in the highest-paying industries and occupations. On the other hand, some job losses were experienced by machine operators and assembly workers. Retail trade had been the largest creator of new jobs but was surpassed in 2007 by construction, and health care and social assistance.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200801010713
    Description:

    While factory jobs have declined in recent years, this has been outweighed by gains elsewhere, often in high-paying occupations.

    Release date: 2008-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110705
    Description:

    Data from the General Social Survey confirm what most working age Canadians probably already know; that is, they are working longer hours either on the job or at home on unpaid domestic chores. In 2005, for example, people between the ages of 25 and 54, the years when women and men are both most likely to be part of the paid work force and raising families, spent about 9 hours per day on all work activities, including paid and unpaid work. This compared with slightly over 8 hours per day nearly 20 years ago in 1986.

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810513209
    Description:

    The general view is that teenage childbearing will have long-term negative effects on the well-being of the mother-- she may have more difficulty completing high school, which means she may be less likely to pursue postsecondary education and acquire skills for better jobs. Since low-skilled jobs tend to pay less, teenage mothers would have a higher likelihood of living in low income. This study looks at women aged 30 to 39 to determine whether teenage childbearing is related to lower long-term socioeconomic characteristics, with the focus on educational attainment, labour force participation, and living in low income.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

Analysis (57)

Analysis (57) (25 of 57 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154917
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey (JVWS) to examine the characteristics of long-term job vacancies, defined as positions for which recruitment efforts had been ongoing for 90 days or more on the day of the survey. Specifically, the study aims to answer the following questions: What is the prevalence of long-term job vacancies in Canada? How do these vacancies differ from other vacant jobs? Is there a link between the duration of the vacancy and the offered wage?

    Release date: 2018-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114826
    Description:

    Since 2007—prior to the economic downturn of 2008/2009—the overall labour force participation of Canadians declined by about two percentage points. The first part of the study investigates the extent to which aging affected changes in labour market participation rates since 2007, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). In the second part, the reasons behind the increase in the participation rates of Canadians aged 55 and over, which have been trending upwards since 1996, are explored.

    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114655
    Description:

    Based on a self-reported measure of overqualification, this article examines the association between overqualification and skills among workers aged 25 to 64 with a university degree, using data from the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). This article also examines the extent to which overqualified workers are dissatisfied with their jobs. Overqualified workers are defined in this study as university-educated workers who reported that they were in a job requiring no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2016-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114651
    Description:

    This study reports on the trends in the labour force participation rate (LFPR) of prime-aged women (25 to 54) in both Canada and the United States. The paper examines the population groups that have been behind the rising divergence in the LFPR between the two countries over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111915
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the proportion of employed people aged 25 to 34 with a university degree rose from 19% to 40% among women, and from 17% to 27% among men. Given the increase in the proportion of university graduates, did the occupational profile of young workers change over the period? This article examines long-term changes in the occupation profiles of young men and women, for both those who did and did not have a university degree. Changes in the share of women employed in these occupations are also examined.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111916
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the share of young people with a university degree increased significantly, as did the share of young workers employed in professional occupations. Nevertheless, many young university degree holders could still be considered 'overqualified'-working in occupations requiring lower levels of education. In this article, changes in overqualification among young graduates are examined over the period from 1991 to 2011.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111862
    Description:

    Absences from work can be expressed in terms of days lost per year, on the basis of Labour Force Survey data. In this In Brief, the new data on work absences for 2012 are introduced, and the differences between private and public sector employees' absences are examined in more detail.

    Release date: 2013-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111775
    Description:

    This study examines employment variations across industries during the recent labour market downturn and subsequent recovery, and examines the sectors that have been drivers of job growth since employment returned to pre-downturn levels.

    Release date: 2013-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111629
    Description:

    This article investigates the factors associated with voting during the May 2011 federal election. Voting rates are examined across personal, family and labour market characteristics. Multivariate techniques are used to account for many of the characteristics associated with voting. The study is based on several supplemental questions, commissioned by Elections Canada, that were added to the May Labour Force Survey. Voting trends and international comparisons, based on administrative data, are also presented.

    Release date: 2012-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411535
    Description:

    About 1 in 6 Canadian workers is self-employed. Does taking on the responsibility of a business result in greater earning potential? More wealth? Affect spending patterns? This paper uses a variety of data sources to examine how the self-employed differ from paid employees in income level and dispersion, wealth, retirement preparation and spending.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111410
    Description:

    The Canadian labour market recently experienced its most significant downturn since the 1990 - 1992 recession. Although employment rebounded more quickly than during the downturns of the early 1980s and early 1990s, the number of individuals without a job remains significantly higher than at the beginning of the downturn. This article investigates how various categories of non-workers grew in the past two years. It also discusses alternative measures of unemployment that include some of these categories in the calculations. Several of the alternative measures also include part-time workers who would prefer to work full time.

    Release date: 2011-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201011013258
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine whether offshorable service-sector occupations and other comparable occupations have displayed similar wage growth since the late 1990s. The analysis allows results to vary across service-sector occupations and worker characteristics.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010513249
    Description:

    Using data from the Labour Force Survey, this article examines the evolution of the employment rate and work hours of wives whose husbands suffered job loss during the last three labour market downturns: 1981 to 1983, 1990 to 1992 and 2008 to 2009.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010313245
    Description:

    During the recent employment downturn, self-employment was one source of employment growth. This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine the sources and characteristics of the recent increase in self-employment, the dynamics of entry into and exit out of self-employment, and to assess the extent to which those who lost paid jobs early in the recession might account for the subsequent surge in self-employment.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911211048
    Description:

    The Canadian labour market recently experienced its worst downturn since the recession of the early 1990s. Since employment last peaked in October 2008, employment declined by 2.3%, or 400,000 individuals. This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine variations in employment levels from October 2008 to October 2009 across a variety of personal and job characteristics. Comparisons are also made with earlier recessions and the U.S. labour market.

    Release date: 2010-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013237
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2005, parental work time increased by substantial margins, especially for families located at the bottom and in the middle of the earnings distribution. However, this increase occurred against a backdrop of a stronger increase in earnings for families at the top of the earnings distribution. This study finds that high earnings families earned more in 2005 than in 1980 for a given amount of parental work time, likely because of higher wages.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200901111023
    Description:

    A look at how the labour market changed between October 2008 and 2009.

    Release date: 2009-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910813235
    Description:

    Women's labour market participation has increased substantially over recent decades, creating challenges for families in balancing work-life responsibilities. The examination of family work patterns revealed significant differences in annual hours of work between families with and those without children.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910613231
    Description:

    Like the United States and the United Kingdom, Canada has a higher proportion of low-paid jobs than Australia and most countries in continental Europe. While the differences with continental Europe highlight different approaches to the labour market, the much lower rate of low-paid work in Australia is more puzzling since that country shares many similarities with Canada. Differences in wage-setting mechanisms appear to play a role in explaining the disparity in rates of low-paid jobs.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910113222
    Description:

    Traditional age-earnings profiles, based on cross-sectional data, typically follow an inverted U-shaped pattern with annual earnings peaking around middle age. With longitudinal data on hourly earnings, the picture changes considerably.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810913216
    Description:

    In 2007, the proportion of employed people in Canada was at its highest level in at least three decades, while the national unemployment rate sank to a 33-year low of 5.8%. However, manufacturing employment in Canada, as in the United States, has been on a downward trend. Between 2002 and 2007 employment rates increased the most in the highest-paying industries and occupations. On the other hand, some job losses were experienced by machine operators and assembly workers. Retail trade had been the largest creator of new jobs but was surpassed in 2007 by construction, and health care and social assistance.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200801010713
    Description:

    While factory jobs have declined in recent years, this has been outweighed by gains elsewhere, often in high-paying occupations.

    Release date: 2008-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110705
    Description:

    Data from the General Social Survey confirm what most working age Canadians probably already know; that is, they are working longer hours either on the job or at home on unpaid domestic chores. In 2005, for example, people between the ages of 25 and 54, the years when women and men are both most likely to be part of the paid work force and raising families, spent about 9 hours per day on all work activities, including paid and unpaid work. This compared with slightly over 8 hours per day nearly 20 years ago in 1986.

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810513209
    Description:

    The general view is that teenage childbearing will have long-term negative effects on the well-being of the mother-- she may have more difficulty completing high school, which means she may be less likely to pursue postsecondary education and acquire skills for better jobs. Since low-skilled jobs tend to pay less, teenage mothers would have a higher likelihood of living in low income. This study looks at women aged 30 to 39 to determine whether teenage childbearing is related to lower long-term socioeconomic characteristics, with the focus on educational attainment, labour force participation, and living in low income.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

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