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All (4)

All (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20040018734
    Description:

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey generated methodological challenges like choosing the sampling plan, developing the questionnaire, collecting the data, weighting the data and estimating the variance.

    Release date: 2005-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Public use microdata: 89M0019X
    Description:

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey (2002) provides information on how people's backgrounds affect their participation in Canada's social, economic and cultural life of Canada. As well, it indicates how Canadians of different ethnic backgrounds interpret and report their ethnicity. Topics covered in the survey include ethnic ancestry, ethnic identity, place of birth, visible minority status, religion, religious participation, knowledge of languages, family background, family interaction, social networks, civic participation, interaction with society, attitudes, satisfaction with life, trust and socio-economic activities.

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) was a post-censal survey which included about 42,500 people aged 15 and over who were interviewed by telephone in the 10 provinces between April and August 2002. The target population did not include persons living in collective dwellings, persons living on Indian reserves, persons declaring an Aboriginal origin or identity in the 2001 Census, or persons living in Northern and remote areas.

    The accompanying documentation is intended to facilitate use of the 2002 EDS public use microdata file. It contains contains information on survey methodology, variables and estimation procedures as well as the rules governing the dissemination of estimates.

    Release date: 2005-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005241
    Description:

    This paper examines the effect of ethnic neighbourhoods on wage growth as well as other labour market outcomes of immigrant men in Canada using the 1981, 1986, 1991 and 1996 Censuses. While the primary measure of affiliation is country of birth, ethnicity, language and visible minority status are also examined to determine the robustness of the findings. Consistent with U.S. findings, ethnic neighbourhoods based on country of birth are found to have a negative impact on the ten-year wage growth of immigrants. Further, the model for wage growth is found to be robust to different lengths of time and different base years as well as the specification of language and ethnicity as the affiliation grouping. Using country of birth as the affiliation index, exposure is also found to have a negative impact on the growth of total and weekly earnings as well as the initial wages of entry cohorts. While little evidence is found on the effects of ethnic neighbourhoods on changes in employment, a negative effect of exposure is found on entry employment rates of the most recent landing cohorts. Although the overall effect of ethnic neighbourhoods on wage growth is negative, ethnic neighbourhoods are found to have a divergent effect on different landing cohorts, having a positive impact on the wage growth of the more recent cohorts and a negative impact on earlier cohorts.

    Release date: 2005-02-25

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Public use microdata: 89M0019X
    Description:

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey (2002) provides information on how people's backgrounds affect their participation in Canada's social, economic and cultural life of Canada. As well, it indicates how Canadians of different ethnic backgrounds interpret and report their ethnicity. Topics covered in the survey include ethnic ancestry, ethnic identity, place of birth, visible minority status, religion, religious participation, knowledge of languages, family background, family interaction, social networks, civic participation, interaction with society, attitudes, satisfaction with life, trust and socio-economic activities.

    The Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) was a post-censal survey which included about 42,500 people aged 15 and over who were interviewed by telephone in the 10 provinces between April and August 2002. The target population did not include persons living in collective dwellings, persons living on Indian reserves, persons declaring an Aboriginal origin or identity in the 2001 Census, or persons living in Northern and remote areas.

    The accompanying documentation is intended to facilitate use of the 2002 EDS public use microdata file. It contains contains information on survey methodology, variables and estimation procedures as well as the rules governing the dissemination of estimates.

    Release date: 2005-05-10

Analysis (2)

Analysis (2) (2 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005241
    Description:

    This paper examines the effect of ethnic neighbourhoods on wage growth as well as other labour market outcomes of immigrant men in Canada using the 1981, 1986, 1991 and 1996 Censuses. While the primary measure of affiliation is country of birth, ethnicity, language and visible minority status are also examined to determine the robustness of the findings. Consistent with U.S. findings, ethnic neighbourhoods based on country of birth are found to have a negative impact on the ten-year wage growth of immigrants. Further, the model for wage growth is found to be robust to different lengths of time and different base years as well as the specification of language and ethnicity as the affiliation grouping. Using country of birth as the affiliation index, exposure is also found to have a negative impact on the growth of total and weekly earnings as well as the initial wages of entry cohorts. While little evidence is found on the effects of ethnic neighbourhoods on changes in employment, a negative effect of exposure is found on entry employment rates of the most recent landing cohorts. Although the overall effect of ethnic neighbourhoods on wage growth is negative, ethnic neighbourhoods are found to have a divergent effect on different landing cohorts, having a positive impact on the wage growth of the more recent cohorts and a negative impact on earlier cohorts.

    Release date: 2005-02-25

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

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