Statistics by subject – Languages

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (11)

All (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2010002
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the English-speaking population in Quebec was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Justice Canada. It is one of eleven such portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Quebec based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2010-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211336
    Description:

    This study analyses data from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey to identify some of the characteristics associated with the ability to understand an Aboriginal language among off-reserve First Nations children aged 2 to 5. More specifically, it examines the extent to which the home, the extended family, child care settings, and the broader community can contribute to the transmission of Aboriginal languages to young First Nations children living off reserve.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-644-X
    Description:

    This document of fact sheets provides an early learning profile of Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Aboriginal children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-644-X201000111281
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides an early learning profile of Inuit children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Inuit children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-644-X201000111280
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides an early learning profile of Métis children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Métis children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-644-X201000111279
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides an early learning profile of off-reserve First Nations children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young off-reserve First Nations children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2010001
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Ontario was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat. It is one of eleven such portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Ontario based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2010-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111142
    Description:

    Métis peoples make up one third of the Aboriginal population in Canada (about 390,000 people in 2006). Using the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (15 and older) and Métis Supplement this article explores various cultural activities of the Métis population. More specifically, it considers involvement in traditional activities, such as: arts and crafts, hunting, fishing, trapping, and gathering wild vegetation. It also explores Aboriginal language use, involvement in Métis-specific organizations, and spiritual and religious practices. Findings are presented by sex, age, and region.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-641-X
    Description:

    This report concerns French-language immigration outside Quebec and its recent evolution, focusing on its numbers, its geographic distribution and its demographic and social characteristics. This statistical portrait will mainly use the concept of first official language spoken (FOLS), which is now widely used as a criterion for a person's linguistic identity in studies on official language minorities. The Francophone immigrant population outside Quebec is comprised of two groups: those who have only French as their first official language spoken (French FOLS immigrants) and those who have both French and English (French-English FOLS immigrants).

    The Francophone immigrant population living outside Quebec is fairly small, both in absolute numbers and in relation to either the French-speaking population or the immigrant population as a whole. However, the relative weight of Francophone immigrants within the French-speaking population has increased, going from 6.2% to 10% between 1991 and 2006, while their weight within the overall immigrant population has varied more moderately, and in 2006 it was, at most, less than 2%.

    The majority of Francophone immigrants outside Quebec 70% are concentrated in Ontario. Furthermore, two-thirds of French-speaking immigrants live in three metropolitan areas: Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver. In Canada outside Quebec, French-English FOLS immigrants, numbering 76,100 in the 2006 Census, are slightly more numerous than French FOLS immigrants, who number 60,900. In some cities, especially Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary, this characteristic is more prevalent, with French-English FOLS immigrants outnumbering their French FOLS counterparts by almost two to one. The demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of these two FOLS groups are sometimes quite different.

    International immigration to Canada has undergone a rapid transformation in recent decades. Immigrants of European origin have tended to give way to immigrants from Asia, Africa and Latin America. In this regard, French FOLS immigrants stand out from other immigrants in that a large proportion of them come from Africa. One of the consequences of this trend has been to change the composition of the French FOLS immigrant population; in 2006, Blacks made up 26% of that population, compared to 5% of the other two immigrant groups.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

  • Public use microdata: 95M0028X
    Description:

    This individuals file provides data on the characteristics of the population. The 2006 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2006 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the subject matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. To ensure the respondents' anonymity, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas.

    With 123 variables, this comprehensive tool is excellent for policy analysts, pollsters, social researchers and anyone interested in modelling and performing statistical regression analysis using census data.

    Note: Users will require knowledge of data manipulation packages such as SAS or SPSS to be able to use the data contained in these files.

    Release date: 2010-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111074
    Description:

    This article looks at the prevalence of French-language knowledge among sales and service workers (salespersons, food servers, cashiers). Information is also provided regarding their use of French at work. There is a special focus on the metropolitan areas of Ottawa-Gatineau, Moncton, Sudbury and Montréal.

    Release date: 2010-01-26

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Public use microdata: 95M0028X
    Description:

    This individuals file provides data on the characteristics of the population. The 2006 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2006 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the subject matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. To ensure the respondents' anonymity, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas.

    With 123 variables, this comprehensive tool is excellent for policy analysts, pollsters, social researchers and anyone interested in modelling and performing statistical regression analysis using census data.

    Note: Users will require knowledge of data manipulation packages such as SAS or SPSS to be able to use the data contained in these files.

    Release date: 2010-03-04

Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2010002
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the English-speaking population in Quebec was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat, Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Justice Canada. It is one of eleven such portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Quebec based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2010-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211336
    Description:

    This study analyses data from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey to identify some of the characteristics associated with the ability to understand an Aboriginal language among off-reserve First Nations children aged 2 to 5. More specifically, it examines the extent to which the home, the extended family, child care settings, and the broader community can contribute to the transmission of Aboriginal languages to young First Nations children living off reserve.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-644-X
    Description:

    This document of fact sheets provides an early learning profile of Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Aboriginal children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-644-X201000111281
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides an early learning profile of Inuit children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Inuit children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-644-X201000111280
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides an early learning profile of Métis children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Métis children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-644-X201000111279
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides an early learning profile of off-reserve First Nations children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young off-reserve First Nations children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-642-X2010001
    Description:

    This demolinguistic portrait of the French-speaking population in Ontario was undertaken with the financial support of Canadian Heritage's Official Languages Secretariat. It is one of eleven such portraits of official-language minorities in Canada, prepared by the Statistics Canada's Language Statistics Section.

    This study paints a general statistical portrait of the official-language minority in Ontario based on data from the Census of Population and the Survey on the Vitality of Official-language Minorities in Canada, conducted in 2006. The purpose of such a portrait is to present a set of characteristics, behaviours and perceptions of the official-language minority population, exploiting the analytical opportunities contained in the data.

    Release date: 2010-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111142
    Description:

    Métis peoples make up one third of the Aboriginal population in Canada (about 390,000 people in 2006). Using the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (15 and older) and Métis Supplement this article explores various cultural activities of the Métis population. More specifically, it considers involvement in traditional activities, such as: arts and crafts, hunting, fishing, trapping, and gathering wild vegetation. It also explores Aboriginal language use, involvement in Métis-specific organizations, and spiritual and religious practices. Findings are presented by sex, age, and region.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-641-X
    Description:

    This report concerns French-language immigration outside Quebec and its recent evolution, focusing on its numbers, its geographic distribution and its demographic and social characteristics. This statistical portrait will mainly use the concept of first official language spoken (FOLS), which is now widely used as a criterion for a person's linguistic identity in studies on official language minorities. The Francophone immigrant population outside Quebec is comprised of two groups: those who have only French as their first official language spoken (French FOLS immigrants) and those who have both French and English (French-English FOLS immigrants).

    The Francophone immigrant population living outside Quebec is fairly small, both in absolute numbers and in relation to either the French-speaking population or the immigrant population as a whole. However, the relative weight of Francophone immigrants within the French-speaking population has increased, going from 6.2% to 10% between 1991 and 2006, while their weight within the overall immigrant population has varied more moderately, and in 2006 it was, at most, less than 2%.

    The majority of Francophone immigrants outside Quebec 70% are concentrated in Ontario. Furthermore, two-thirds of French-speaking immigrants live in three metropolitan areas: Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver. In Canada outside Quebec, French-English FOLS immigrants, numbering 76,100 in the 2006 Census, are slightly more numerous than French FOLS immigrants, who number 60,900. In some cities, especially Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary, this characteristic is more prevalent, with French-English FOLS immigrants outnumbering their French FOLS counterparts by almost two to one. The demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of these two FOLS groups are sometimes quite different.

    International immigration to Canada has undergone a rapid transformation in recent decades. Immigrants of European origin have tended to give way to immigrants from Asia, Africa and Latin America. In this regard, French FOLS immigrants stand out from other immigrants in that a large proportion of them come from Africa. One of the consequences of this trend has been to change the composition of the French FOLS immigrant population; in 2006, Blacks made up 26% of that population, compared to 5% of the other two immigrant groups.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111074
    Description:

    This article looks at the prevalence of French-language knowledge among sales and service workers (salespersons, food servers, cashiers). Information is also provided regarding their use of French at work. There is a special focus on the metropolitan areas of Ottawa-Gatineau, Moncton, Sudbury and Montréal.

    Release date: 2010-01-26

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: