Statistics by subject – Manufacturing

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (15)

All (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Technical products: 68-515-X
    Description:

    This overview document describes the conceptual underpinnings of the Integrated Business Statistics Program and explains how program components facilitate a more integrated approach to economic surveying at Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2015-06-17

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2013030
    Description:

    This paper provides a provincial perspective on the slowdown in productivity and economic growth in the total business sector in Canada between 2000 and 2010 compared to the late 1990s. It uses the most recent provincial multifactor productivity database.

    Release date: 2013-04-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2011001
    Description:

    This working paper profiles Canadian firms involved in the development and production of Bioproducts. It provides data on the number and types of Bioproducts firms in 2009, covering bioproducts revenues, research and development, use of biomass, patents, products, business practices and the impact of government regulations on the sector.

    Release date: 2011-12-23

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2009024
    Description:

    This paper uses plant-level data on productivity growth and changes in market share over different periods during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to investigate whether plants with declining market shares obtain productivity spillovers from more successful producers and whether the impact of spillovers is affected by the distance between plants. We are primarily interested in the extent to which productivity externalities moderate the centrifugal forces that separate growing plants from declining rivals because of the productivity advantages enjoyed by the former.

    The paper focuses on the productivity performance of plants with declining market shares as potential receivers of productivity spillovers. Two possible sources for these spillovers are examined rival plants operating at the technological frontier and rivals that are actively gaining market share. The analysis advances a model of the externality process in which the productivity of declining plants is influenced by (1) the economic distance of the declining plant from its technological frontier at the beginning of any period, (2) contemporaneous productivity gains in rival plants that are actively wresting market share away from decliners, and (3) the distance between rival plants.

    We evaluate the existence and magnitude of these sources of spillovers frontier plants and market-share gainers because of what they reveal about the types of productive information that struggling plants may be able to assimilate from rivals. Spillovers from the plants at the existing frontier are likely to reflect the established best practices of industry leaders; spillovers coming from market-share gainers involve new sources of productive knowledge that emerge as the frontier is actively being re-established. Our model also incorporates geographic information on the proximity of declining plants to both frontier plants and market-share gainers to test whether productivity spillovers are spatially circumscribed. The results provide evidence that productivity improvements in more successful plants benefit their struggling rivals and that these benefits are inversely related to distance; however, the magnitude of spillovers from growing plants to decliners is relatively small. Spillovers do not offer much of a safety net for producers that are losing the productivity race. The paper also shows that declining plants that start out behind the technological frontier are likely to fall further behind, after the impact of mean reversion is taken into account.

    Release date: 2009-05-19

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2008022
    Description:

    Many historical comparisons of international productivity use measures of labour productivity (output per worker). Differences in labour productivity can be caused by differences in technical efficiency or differences in capital intensity. Moving to measures of total factor productivity allows international comparisons to ascertain whether differences in labour productivity arise from differences in efficiency or differences in factors utilized in the production process.

    This paper examines differences in output per worker in the manufacturing sectors of Canada and the United States in 1929 and the extent to which it arises from efficiency differences. It makes corrections for differences in capital and materials intensity per worker in order to derive a measure of total factor efficiency of Canada relative to the United States, using detailed industry data. It finds that while output per worker in Canada was only about 75% of the United States productivity level, the total factor productivity measure of Canada was about the same as the United States level - that is, there was very little difference in technical efficiency in the two countries. Canada's lower output per worker was the result of the use of less capital and materials per worker than the United States.

    Release date: 2008-12-23

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007015
    Description:

    In this paper, we provide an international comparison of the growth in Canadian and U.S. manufacturing industries over the 1961-to-2003 period. We find that average annual growth rates of labour productivity growth were almost identical in the Canadian and U.S. manufacturing sectors during this period. But the sources of labour productivity growth differed in the two countries. Intermediate input deepening was a more important source of labour productivity growth in Canada than in the United States, while investment in capital and multifactor productivity (MFP) growth were more important in the United States than in Canada. After 1996, labour productivity growth in Canada was lower than in the United States. The post-1996 slower labour productivity growth in Canada relative to the United States was due to slower growth in MFP and slower growth in capital intensity. The slower MFP growth in Canada accounted for 60% of Canada - United States labour productivity growth difference, and slower growth in capital intensity accounted for 30%. The slower MFP growth in the Canadian manufacturing sector relative to that of the United States after 1996 was due to lower MFP growth in the computer and electronic products industry. The slower growth in capital'labour ratio in the Canadian manufacturing compared with the United States after 1996 is related to the changes in relative prices of capital and labour inputs in the two countries.

    Release date: 2007-12-18

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2005075
    Description:

    This paper presents research carried out to determine the competitiveness of Canada's poultry processing industry and investigates the competitiveness of Canada's poultry processing industry from the perspective of output price, market structure, and productivity performance. The main objective of the research is to estimate the degree of competitiveness of Canada's poultry processing sector related to its U.S. counterpart during the ten-year period from 1991 to 2001.

    Release date: 2005-10-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005016
    Description:

    The main indicators of functional food and nutraceutical activities in Canada are presented in this article. The data are from the 2003 Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals Survey which was designed to provide a benchmark measurement of the industry and a better understanding of the scope and nature of the sector.

    Release date: 2005-09-26

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2004070
    Description:

    The objective of this study is to provide up-to-date measures of the concentration of the manufacturing industries in the Canadian food-processing sector.

    Release date: 2004-07-09

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002016
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 1999 was conducted in the fall of 1999. It surveyed the manufacturing field and was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries.

    This is part of a series of working papers based on the Survey of Innovation 1999. Previous working papers include an examination of national estimates of innovation in manufacturing and statistical tables of provincial estimates of innovation in manufacturing.

    This document includes a description of survey methodology, as well as statistical tables for manufacturing industries at the national level for all non write-in questions from the Survey of Innovation 1999 questionnaire.

    Tables present survey results on the following subjects: competitive environment; firm success factors; percentage of innovative firms; unsuccessful or not yet completed innovation projects; activities linked to innovation; sources of information; objectives; problems and obstacles; impact; cooperative and collaborative arrangements; most important innovation; building and construction products; natural resource products; research and development; intellectual property; human resources; andgovernment support programs.

    Release date: 2003-01-13

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2002059
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is to examine profitability trends in the Canadian food processing industry, comparing it with other manufacturing industries during the period of 1990 to 1998.

    Release date: 2002-11-14

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2002056
    Description:

    This paper examines the food-retailing sector of the Canadian economy for the period 1990 to 1998, using profitability as a measure of performance.

    Release date: 2002-09-20

  • Technical products: 61F0041M1997001
    Description:

    Primary product specialization and coverage ratios are now being produced and published for Canadian manufacturing industries. This paper reviews concepts, outlines uses, summarizes 1994 data, details a number of methodological issues, examines sources of change over time and measures those sources by means of a shift/share decomposition. The paper also describes the algorithm that has been developed for detecting and treating confidential values. This algorithm includes the use of rounding and the application of ranges; such treatment maintains confidentiality while allowing specialization and coverage data to be released for each and every manufacturing industry. The Appendix comprises specialization and coverage ratios for 1994.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Technical products: 61F0041M1998003
    Description:

    This on-line product describes the personalization of the long-form questionnaires of Canada's Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM). Personalization was motivated by the desire to reduce respondent burden. Prior to personalization, long-form questionnaires were the same for all the establishments of a given 4-digit SIC industry. Each questionnaire contained a list comprising almost all the commodities likely to be used as inputs or produced as outputs by that industry. For the typical establishment, only a small subset of the commodities listed was applicable. Personalization involved tailoring those lists to each individual establishment, based on the previous reporting of that same establishment.

    After first defining terms and then providing some quantification of the need for personalization, the paper details a number of the prerequisites - an algorithm for commodity selection, a set of stand-alone commodity descriptions, and an automated questionnaire production system. The paper next details a number of the impacts of personalization - and does so in terms of response burden, loss of information, and automation. The paper concludes with a summary and some recommendations.

    Release date: 1998-04-03

  • Technical products: 61F0041M1998001
    Description:

    In 1995, Statistics Canada began publishing specialization and coverage ratios for Canadian manufacturing industries. These ratios measure the homogeneity and completeness of those industries. Constructing these ratios requires, output commodity data and a concordance that links commodities and industries. The output commodity data are collected at the establishment level by the Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM)

    Release date: 1998-04-01

Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Analysis (0)

Analysis (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Reference (15)

Reference (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Technical products: 68-515-X
    Description:

    This overview document describes the conceptual underpinnings of the Integrated Business Statistics Program and explains how program components facilitate a more integrated approach to economic surveying at Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2015-06-17

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2013030
    Description:

    This paper provides a provincial perspective on the slowdown in productivity and economic growth in the total business sector in Canada between 2000 and 2010 compared to the late 1990s. It uses the most recent provincial multifactor productivity database.

    Release date: 2013-04-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2011001
    Description:

    This working paper profiles Canadian firms involved in the development and production of Bioproducts. It provides data on the number and types of Bioproducts firms in 2009, covering bioproducts revenues, research and development, use of biomass, patents, products, business practices and the impact of government regulations on the sector.

    Release date: 2011-12-23

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2009024
    Description:

    This paper uses plant-level data on productivity growth and changes in market share over different periods during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to investigate whether plants with declining market shares obtain productivity spillovers from more successful producers and whether the impact of spillovers is affected by the distance between plants. We are primarily interested in the extent to which productivity externalities moderate the centrifugal forces that separate growing plants from declining rivals because of the productivity advantages enjoyed by the former.

    The paper focuses on the productivity performance of plants with declining market shares as potential receivers of productivity spillovers. Two possible sources for these spillovers are examined rival plants operating at the technological frontier and rivals that are actively gaining market share. The analysis advances a model of the externality process in which the productivity of declining plants is influenced by (1) the economic distance of the declining plant from its technological frontier at the beginning of any period, (2) contemporaneous productivity gains in rival plants that are actively wresting market share away from decliners, and (3) the distance between rival plants.

    We evaluate the existence and magnitude of these sources of spillovers frontier plants and market-share gainers because of what they reveal about the types of productive information that struggling plants may be able to assimilate from rivals. Spillovers from the plants at the existing frontier are likely to reflect the established best practices of industry leaders; spillovers coming from market-share gainers involve new sources of productive knowledge that emerge as the frontier is actively being re-established. Our model also incorporates geographic information on the proximity of declining plants to both frontier plants and market-share gainers to test whether productivity spillovers are spatially circumscribed. The results provide evidence that productivity improvements in more successful plants benefit their struggling rivals and that these benefits are inversely related to distance; however, the magnitude of spillovers from growing plants to decliners is relatively small. Spillovers do not offer much of a safety net for producers that are losing the productivity race. The paper also shows that declining plants that start out behind the technological frontier are likely to fall further behind, after the impact of mean reversion is taken into account.

    Release date: 2009-05-19

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2008022
    Description:

    Many historical comparisons of international productivity use measures of labour productivity (output per worker). Differences in labour productivity can be caused by differences in technical efficiency or differences in capital intensity. Moving to measures of total factor productivity allows international comparisons to ascertain whether differences in labour productivity arise from differences in efficiency or differences in factors utilized in the production process.

    This paper examines differences in output per worker in the manufacturing sectors of Canada and the United States in 1929 and the extent to which it arises from efficiency differences. It makes corrections for differences in capital and materials intensity per worker in order to derive a measure of total factor efficiency of Canada relative to the United States, using detailed industry data. It finds that while output per worker in Canada was only about 75% of the United States productivity level, the total factor productivity measure of Canada was about the same as the United States level - that is, there was very little difference in technical efficiency in the two countries. Canada's lower output per worker was the result of the use of less capital and materials per worker than the United States.

    Release date: 2008-12-23

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007015
    Description:

    In this paper, we provide an international comparison of the growth in Canadian and U.S. manufacturing industries over the 1961-to-2003 period. We find that average annual growth rates of labour productivity growth were almost identical in the Canadian and U.S. manufacturing sectors during this period. But the sources of labour productivity growth differed in the two countries. Intermediate input deepening was a more important source of labour productivity growth in Canada than in the United States, while investment in capital and multifactor productivity (MFP) growth were more important in the United States than in Canada. After 1996, labour productivity growth in Canada was lower than in the United States. The post-1996 slower labour productivity growth in Canada relative to the United States was due to slower growth in MFP and slower growth in capital intensity. The slower MFP growth in Canada accounted for 60% of Canada - United States labour productivity growth difference, and slower growth in capital intensity accounted for 30%. The slower MFP growth in the Canadian manufacturing sector relative to that of the United States after 1996 was due to lower MFP growth in the computer and electronic products industry. The slower growth in capital'labour ratio in the Canadian manufacturing compared with the United States after 1996 is related to the changes in relative prices of capital and labour inputs in the two countries.

    Release date: 2007-12-18

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2005075
    Description:

    This paper presents research carried out to determine the competitiveness of Canada's poultry processing industry and investigates the competitiveness of Canada's poultry processing industry from the perspective of output price, market structure, and productivity performance. The main objective of the research is to estimate the degree of competitiveness of Canada's poultry processing sector related to its U.S. counterpart during the ten-year period from 1991 to 2001.

    Release date: 2005-10-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005016
    Description:

    The main indicators of functional food and nutraceutical activities in Canada are presented in this article. The data are from the 2003 Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals Survey which was designed to provide a benchmark measurement of the industry and a better understanding of the scope and nature of the sector.

    Release date: 2005-09-26

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2004070
    Description:

    The objective of this study is to provide up-to-date measures of the concentration of the manufacturing industries in the Canadian food-processing sector.

    Release date: 2004-07-09

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002016
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 1999 was conducted in the fall of 1999. It surveyed the manufacturing field and was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries.

    This is part of a series of working papers based on the Survey of Innovation 1999. Previous working papers include an examination of national estimates of innovation in manufacturing and statistical tables of provincial estimates of innovation in manufacturing.

    This document includes a description of survey methodology, as well as statistical tables for manufacturing industries at the national level for all non write-in questions from the Survey of Innovation 1999 questionnaire.

    Tables present survey results on the following subjects: competitive environment; firm success factors; percentage of innovative firms; unsuccessful or not yet completed innovation projects; activities linked to innovation; sources of information; objectives; problems and obstacles; impact; cooperative and collaborative arrangements; most important innovation; building and construction products; natural resource products; research and development; intellectual property; human resources; andgovernment support programs.

    Release date: 2003-01-13

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2002059
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is to examine profitability trends in the Canadian food processing industry, comparing it with other manufacturing industries during the period of 1990 to 1998.

    Release date: 2002-11-14

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2002056
    Description:

    This paper examines the food-retailing sector of the Canadian economy for the period 1990 to 1998, using profitability as a measure of performance.

    Release date: 2002-09-20

  • Technical products: 61F0041M1997001
    Description:

    Primary product specialization and coverage ratios are now being produced and published for Canadian manufacturing industries. This paper reviews concepts, outlines uses, summarizes 1994 data, details a number of methodological issues, examines sources of change over time and measures those sources by means of a shift/share decomposition. The paper also describes the algorithm that has been developed for detecting and treating confidential values. This algorithm includes the use of rounding and the application of ranges; such treatment maintains confidentiality while allowing specialization and coverage data to be released for each and every manufacturing industry. The Appendix comprises specialization and coverage ratios for 1994.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Technical products: 61F0041M1998003
    Description:

    This on-line product describes the personalization of the long-form questionnaires of Canada's Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM). Personalization was motivated by the desire to reduce respondent burden. Prior to personalization, long-form questionnaires were the same for all the establishments of a given 4-digit SIC industry. Each questionnaire contained a list comprising almost all the commodities likely to be used as inputs or produced as outputs by that industry. For the typical establishment, only a small subset of the commodities listed was applicable. Personalization involved tailoring those lists to each individual establishment, based on the previous reporting of that same establishment.

    After first defining terms and then providing some quantification of the need for personalization, the paper details a number of the prerequisites - an algorithm for commodity selection, a set of stand-alone commodity descriptions, and an automated questionnaire production system. The paper next details a number of the impacts of personalization - and does so in terms of response burden, loss of information, and automation. The paper concludes with a summary and some recommendations.

    Release date: 1998-04-03

  • Technical products: 61F0041M1998001
    Description:

    In 1995, Statistics Canada began publishing specialization and coverage ratios for Canadian manufacturing industries. These ratios measure the homogeneity and completeness of those industries. Constructing these ratios requires, output commodity data and a concordance that links commodities and industries. The output commodity data are collected at the establishment level by the Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM)

    Release date: 1998-04-01

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: