Statistics by subject – Manufacturing

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All (8)

All (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001169
    Description:

    This paper documents the changing geography of the Canadian manufacturing sector over a twenty-two year period (1976-1997). It does so by looking at the shifts in employment, as well as other measures of industrial change, across different levels of the rural/urban hierarchy - central cities, adjacent suburbs, medium and small cities, and rural areas.

    The analysis demonstrates that the most dramatic shifts in manufacturing employment were from the central cities of large metropolitan regions to their suburbs. Paralleling trends in the United States, rural regions of Canada have increased their share of manufacturing employment. Rising rural employment shares were due to declining employment shares of small cities and, to lesser degree, large urban regions. Increasing rural employment was particularly prominent in Quebec, where employment shifted away from the Montreal region. By way of contrast, Ontario's rural regions only maintained their share of employment and the Toronto region increased its share of provincial employment over the period. The changing fortunes of rural and urban areas was not the result of across-the-board shifts in manufacturing employment, but was the net outcome of differing locational patterns across industries.

    Change across the rural/urban hierarchy is also measured in terms of wage and productivity levels, diversity, and volatility. In contrast to the United States, wages and productivity in Canada do not consistently decline moving down the rural/urban hierarchy from the largest cities to the most rural parts of the country. Only after controlling for the types of manufacturing industries found in rural and urban regions is it apparent that wages and productivity decline with the size of place. The analysis also demonstrates that over time most rural and urban regions are diversifying across a wider variety of manufacturing industries and that shifts in employment shares across industries - a measure of economic instability - has for some rural/urban classifications increased modestly.

    Release date: 2001-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001177
    Description:

    Recent research has suggested that investment has shifted from urban areas to more rural locales. However, Canadian manufacturing remains predominantly an urban activity with more than 40% of manufacturing employment located in Canada's three largest urban regions. This paper examines the changing manufacturing landscapes of Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver and outlines the shifts in industry mix, employment, and wage levels that have taken place over the period between 1976 and 1997. The analysis uses a longitudinal plant-level database based upon the Annual Survey of Manufactures conducted by Statistics Canada.

    Toronto and Vancouver both experience growth in the manufacturing sector, while Montreal experiences decline driven by differences in their industrial structure. Manufacturing activity has increased in a number of sectors of Toronto's economy, but has been particularly influenced by the growing automotive sector that ties the city to a large North American market. Montreal has experienced declines across most of the manufacturing industries. A heavy concentration of employment in labour intensive industries such as textiles and clothing, which have experienced severe declines across Canada, has amplified the level of decline in Montreal. However, Montreal has seen some growth in science-based industries. While Vancouver's manufacturing economy is much smaller in absolute terms, maintaining slightly less than a 5% share of national manufacturing employment, it has exhibited higher levels of long-run growth and restructuring than its eastern counterparts.

    A second focus of the paper is to explore the relationship between economic volatility and diversity in the manufacturing sector using a number of statistical measures. Toronto and Montreal have diverse industrial structures, although each has become slightly more concentrated over the study period. In Montreal, this is due to the increasing importance of other industries, as the clothing and textiles industry declines. In Toronto, this can be attributed to the increased importance of the food and transportation equipment industries. Vancouver has become increasingly diversified over the study period, reflecting the growth and dynamism of this sector. The mature manufacturing economies of Toronto and Montreal exhibit lower levels of volatility than their western counterpart.

    Release date: 2001-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20010095953
    Description:

    Food manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers have managed to sustain reasonable returns during the 1990s despite the challenges posed by the advent of free trade agreements and the changing eating habits of the population. This article looks at the returns on investment for businesses operating in the domestic food sector during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2001-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001173
    Description:

    Using survey data, this paper investigates problems that firms in the Canadian manufacturing sector face in their decision to adopt advanced technology. The data show that while the use of advanced technology is relatively important (users account for over 80% of all shipments), it is not widespread among firms (users represent only about one-third of all establishments). One explanation lies in the fact that while advanced technologies provide a wide range of benefits, firms also face a series of problems that impede them from adopting advanced technology. These impediments fall into five groups: cost-related, institution-related, labour-related, organization-related, and information-related.

    While it might be expected that impediments would be higher for non-users than users of technologies, the opposite occurs. We posit that the reason for this is that innovation involves a learning process. Innovators and technology users face problems that they have to solve and the more innovative firms have greater problems. We test this by examining the factors that are related to whether a firm reports that it faced impediments. Our multivariate analysis reveals that impediments are reported more frequently among technology users than non-users; and more frequently among innovating firms than non-innovating ones. We conclude that the information on impediments in technology and other related surveys (innovation) should not be interpreted as impenetrable barriers that prevent technology adoption. Rather, these surveys indicate areas where successful firms face and solve problems.

    Release date: 2001-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001165
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which customers/suppliers innovation networks are related to the size and pattern of inter-industry goods flows. It does so by devising a diversification index to measure the nature of inter-industry links that arise from the flow of goods and services from suppliers to customers. It then relates these diversification patterns to the importance of customer and supplier innovation networks.

    Input/output matrices are used to measure the extent of inter-industry links and the pattern of inter-industry goods flows. The importance of customer/supplier networks is derived from data coming from the 1993 Survey of Innovation and Advanced Technology.

    The study finds that the importance of supplier and of customer innovation networks is related to the structure of inter-industry trade flows. Where there are a small number of important backward inter-industry links, firms are more likely to make greater use of supplier partnerships. On the other hand, the importance of customer links increases when there is a large number of industry linkages downstream.

    Release date: 2001-05-04

  • Table: 15-204-X19990005494
    Description:

    This chapter examines long-run productivity growth trends in the Canadian and U.S. business and manufacturing sectors, and short-run growth in labour productivity.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Table: 15-204-X19990005495
    Description:

    This chapter examines productivity growth in manufacturing by size of establishment and by whether it is Canadian- or foreign-owned.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Table: 15-204-X19990005498
    Description:

    This chapter measures the effect of modifying the standard productivity growth framework to remove the effects of economies of scale.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

Analysis (5)

Analysis (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001169
    Description:

    This paper documents the changing geography of the Canadian manufacturing sector over a twenty-two year period (1976-1997). It does so by looking at the shifts in employment, as well as other measures of industrial change, across different levels of the rural/urban hierarchy - central cities, adjacent suburbs, medium and small cities, and rural areas.

    The analysis demonstrates that the most dramatic shifts in manufacturing employment were from the central cities of large metropolitan regions to their suburbs. Paralleling trends in the United States, rural regions of Canada have increased their share of manufacturing employment. Rising rural employment shares were due to declining employment shares of small cities and, to lesser degree, large urban regions. Increasing rural employment was particularly prominent in Quebec, where employment shifted away from the Montreal region. By way of contrast, Ontario's rural regions only maintained their share of employment and the Toronto region increased its share of provincial employment over the period. The changing fortunes of rural and urban areas was not the result of across-the-board shifts in manufacturing employment, but was the net outcome of differing locational patterns across industries.

    Change across the rural/urban hierarchy is also measured in terms of wage and productivity levels, diversity, and volatility. In contrast to the United States, wages and productivity in Canada do not consistently decline moving down the rural/urban hierarchy from the largest cities to the most rural parts of the country. Only after controlling for the types of manufacturing industries found in rural and urban regions is it apparent that wages and productivity decline with the size of place. The analysis also demonstrates that over time most rural and urban regions are diversifying across a wider variety of manufacturing industries and that shifts in employment shares across industries - a measure of economic instability - has for some rural/urban classifications increased modestly.

    Release date: 2001-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001177
    Description:

    Recent research has suggested that investment has shifted from urban areas to more rural locales. However, Canadian manufacturing remains predominantly an urban activity with more than 40% of manufacturing employment located in Canada's three largest urban regions. This paper examines the changing manufacturing landscapes of Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver and outlines the shifts in industry mix, employment, and wage levels that have taken place over the period between 1976 and 1997. The analysis uses a longitudinal plant-level database based upon the Annual Survey of Manufactures conducted by Statistics Canada.

    Toronto and Vancouver both experience growth in the manufacturing sector, while Montreal experiences decline driven by differences in their industrial structure. Manufacturing activity has increased in a number of sectors of Toronto's economy, but has been particularly influenced by the growing automotive sector that ties the city to a large North American market. Montreal has experienced declines across most of the manufacturing industries. A heavy concentration of employment in labour intensive industries such as textiles and clothing, which have experienced severe declines across Canada, has amplified the level of decline in Montreal. However, Montreal has seen some growth in science-based industries. While Vancouver's manufacturing economy is much smaller in absolute terms, maintaining slightly less than a 5% share of national manufacturing employment, it has exhibited higher levels of long-run growth and restructuring than its eastern counterparts.

    A second focus of the paper is to explore the relationship between economic volatility and diversity in the manufacturing sector using a number of statistical measures. Toronto and Montreal have diverse industrial structures, although each has become slightly more concentrated over the study period. In Montreal, this is due to the increasing importance of other industries, as the clothing and textiles industry declines. In Toronto, this can be attributed to the increased importance of the food and transportation equipment industries. Vancouver has become increasingly diversified over the study period, reflecting the growth and dynamism of this sector. The mature manufacturing economies of Toronto and Montreal exhibit lower levels of volatility than their western counterpart.

    Release date: 2001-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20010095953
    Description:

    Food manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers have managed to sustain reasonable returns during the 1990s despite the challenges posed by the advent of free trade agreements and the changing eating habits of the population. This article looks at the returns on investment for businesses operating in the domestic food sector during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2001-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001173
    Description:

    Using survey data, this paper investigates problems that firms in the Canadian manufacturing sector face in their decision to adopt advanced technology. The data show that while the use of advanced technology is relatively important (users account for over 80% of all shipments), it is not widespread among firms (users represent only about one-third of all establishments). One explanation lies in the fact that while advanced technologies provide a wide range of benefits, firms also face a series of problems that impede them from adopting advanced technology. These impediments fall into five groups: cost-related, institution-related, labour-related, organization-related, and information-related.

    While it might be expected that impediments would be higher for non-users than users of technologies, the opposite occurs. We posit that the reason for this is that innovation involves a learning process. Innovators and technology users face problems that they have to solve and the more innovative firms have greater problems. We test this by examining the factors that are related to whether a firm reports that it faced impediments. Our multivariate analysis reveals that impediments are reported more frequently among technology users than non-users; and more frequently among innovating firms than non-innovating ones. We conclude that the information on impediments in technology and other related surveys (innovation) should not be interpreted as impenetrable barriers that prevent technology adoption. Rather, these surveys indicate areas where successful firms face and solve problems.

    Release date: 2001-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001165
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which customers/suppliers innovation networks are related to the size and pattern of inter-industry goods flows. It does so by devising a diversification index to measure the nature of inter-industry links that arise from the flow of goods and services from suppliers to customers. It then relates these diversification patterns to the importance of customer and supplier innovation networks.

    Input/output matrices are used to measure the extent of inter-industry links and the pattern of inter-industry goods flows. The importance of customer/supplier networks is derived from data coming from the 1993 Survey of Innovation and Advanced Technology.

    The study finds that the importance of supplier and of customer innovation networks is related to the structure of inter-industry trade flows. Where there are a small number of important backward inter-industry links, firms are more likely to make greater use of supplier partnerships. On the other hand, the importance of customer links increases when there is a large number of industry linkages downstream.

    Release date: 2001-05-04

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