Statistics by subject – Manufacturing

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All (11)

All (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 31F0027M
    Description:

    The intent of this research paper series is to address a variety of topics related to the Canadian manufacturing sector as a whole. The papers in this series are based on the Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) and focus on the entire manufacturing sector (all 22 major manufacturing groups). Other data sources are used in specific papers. The topics covered include packaging products used by manufacturing industries, evolution of production costs, comparison of establishment groups (ranked by volume of shipments) and stages of processing.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 31F0027M2002001
    Description:

    This paper describes the main characteristics of the Canadian lumber industry, looks at the different impacts of lumber trade disputes, and puts into perspective the strong reliance of the Canadian lumber industry on the U.S. market, its biggest customer.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2002059
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is to examine profitability trends in the Canadian food processing industry, comparing it with other manufacturing industries during the period of 1990 to 1998.

    Release date: 2002-11-14

  • Table: 15-001-X20020076510
    Description:

    This analytical paper focusses on how pharmaceutical manufacturing production is distributed and which factors favour its future growth, using such variables as its gross domestic product (GDP), employment, research and development (R&D) and innovation patterns. How this industry differs from other manufacturing industries is also discussed.

    Release date: 2002-10-07

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2002056
    Description:

    This paper examines the food-retailing sector of the Canadian economy for the period 1990 to 1998, using profitability as a measure of performance.

    Release date: 2002-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002189
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring size of entry. The main purpose of this paper is to summarize the information we have on the amount of entry in Canada.

    The paper also fulfils another purpose. Some studies have focused on cross-country comparisons (Geroski and Schwalbach 1991; OECD 2001). Interpretation of the results of these studies is difficult unless methodological issues regarding how entry is measured are addressed. Without an understanding of the extent to which different databases produce different results, international comparisons are difficult to evaluate. Cross-country comparisons that are derived from extremely different data sources may be misleading because of the lack of comparability.

    Since there is more than one reliable database that can be used to estimate entry in Canada, this paper asks how measured entry rates vary across different Canadian databases. By examining the difference in entry rates produced by these databases, we provide an estimate of the range or confidence interval that should be used in evaluating whether there are real differences in measured entry rates across countries. We also offer guidance as to the questions that should be asked about the databases used by researchers who conduct international studies. Finally, we make suggestions as to areas of comparison on which international studies should focus.

    Release date: 2002-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002168
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors contributing to the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian food-processing sector. The numbers of technologies used by a plant is found to be highly correlated with expected gains in firm performance. The benefits of enhanced food safety and quality, as well as productivity improvements, are closely associated with technology use. Impediments that negatively affect technology use include software costs, problems with external financing, lack of cash flow for financing, and internal management problems. Even after accounting for the different benefits and costs associated with technology adoption, the numbers of advanced technologies that are adopted are found to be greater in larger plants, in foreign-controlled plants, in plants that engage in both primary and secondary processing, and in the dairy, fruit and vegetable and "other" food product industries.

    Release date: 2002-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2002003
    Description:

    This paper examines small producers in the Canadian and U.S. manufacturing sectors in terms of output and employment from the early 1970s to the late 1990s.

    Release date: 2002-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002179
    Description:

    This paper studies changes in diversification of firms and plants since the early 1970s in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It finds that there has been a general increase in specialization of both firms and plants. Firms have been continuously reducing the span of industries in which they operate, particularly when the industries are unrelated. Commodity specialization has also occurred at the plant level; however, in contrast to industry specialization, the pace of commodity specialization increased emerged late in the period, around the time of implementation of the Free Trade Agreement between Canada and the United States. Plant specialization increased most in those plants that moved most strongly into export markets.

    Release date: 2002-02-05

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

Analysis (6)

Analysis (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 31F0027M
    Description:

    The intent of this research paper series is to address a variety of topics related to the Canadian manufacturing sector as a whole. The papers in this series are based on the Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) and focus on the entire manufacturing sector (all 22 major manufacturing groups). Other data sources are used in specific papers. The topics covered include packaging products used by manufacturing industries, evolution of production costs, comparison of establishment groups (ranked by volume of shipments) and stages of processing.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 31F0027M2002001
    Description:

    This paper describes the main characteristics of the Canadian lumber industry, looks at the different impacts of lumber trade disputes, and puts into perspective the strong reliance of the Canadian lumber industry on the U.S. market, its biggest customer.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002189
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring size of entry. The main purpose of this paper is to summarize the information we have on the amount of entry in Canada.

    The paper also fulfils another purpose. Some studies have focused on cross-country comparisons (Geroski and Schwalbach 1991; OECD 2001). Interpretation of the results of these studies is difficult unless methodological issues regarding how entry is measured are addressed. Without an understanding of the extent to which different databases produce different results, international comparisons are difficult to evaluate. Cross-country comparisons that are derived from extremely different data sources may be misleading because of the lack of comparability.

    Since there is more than one reliable database that can be used to estimate entry in Canada, this paper asks how measured entry rates vary across different Canadian databases. By examining the difference in entry rates produced by these databases, we provide an estimate of the range or confidence interval that should be used in evaluating whether there are real differences in measured entry rates across countries. We also offer guidance as to the questions that should be asked about the databases used by researchers who conduct international studies. Finally, we make suggestions as to areas of comparison on which international studies should focus.

    Release date: 2002-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002168
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors contributing to the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian food-processing sector. The numbers of technologies used by a plant is found to be highly correlated with expected gains in firm performance. The benefits of enhanced food safety and quality, as well as productivity improvements, are closely associated with technology use. Impediments that negatively affect technology use include software costs, problems with external financing, lack of cash flow for financing, and internal management problems. Even after accounting for the different benefits and costs associated with technology adoption, the numbers of advanced technologies that are adopted are found to be greater in larger plants, in foreign-controlled plants, in plants that engage in both primary and secondary processing, and in the dairy, fruit and vegetable and "other" food product industries.

    Release date: 2002-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2002003
    Description:

    This paper examines small producers in the Canadian and U.S. manufacturing sectors in terms of output and employment from the early 1970s to the late 1990s.

    Release date: 2002-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002179
    Description:

    This paper studies changes in diversification of firms and plants since the early 1970s in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It finds that there has been a general increase in specialization of both firms and plants. Firms have been continuously reducing the span of industries in which they operate, particularly when the industries are unrelated. Commodity specialization has also occurred at the plant level; however, in contrast to industry specialization, the pace of commodity specialization increased emerged late in the period, around the time of implementation of the Free Trade Agreement between Canada and the United States. Plant specialization increased most in those plants that moved most strongly into export markets.

    Release date: 2002-02-05

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

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