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All (32)

All (32) (25 of 32 results)

  • Technical products: 98-506-X2017001
    Description:

    The first issue of the Census Program Transformation Project (CPTP) report explains what is new in census research. It introduces the CPTP and its objectives. It provides information on the creation of statistical registers to support the project. The first issue also briefly describes a new combined census methodology to produce population and dwelling counts that is being investigated.

    Release date: 2017-08-11

  • Technical products: 98-506-X
    Description:

    The report will provide updates on the Census Program Transformation Project (CPTP). The CPTP is a research project launched by Statistics Canada to explore how data from administrative sources could be used to replace or complement the enumerated population and dwelling counts. Each issue will cover a different topic as research progresses.

    Release date: 2017-08-11

  • Technical products: 75-005-M2016001
    Description:

    In over 70 years, the methodology and questionnaire, as well as the collection and processing techniques of the Canadian Labour Force Survey have undergone major changes. This document summarizes these changes chronologically and provides references to more detailed information sources. Among the most significant changes were two questionnaire redesigns, which occurred approximately 20 years apart, in 1976 and 1997.

    Release date: 2017-01-06

  • Technical products: 92F0138M
    Description:

    The Geography working paper series is intended to stimulate discussion on a variety of topics covering conceptual, methodological or technical work to support the development and dissemination of the division's data, products and services. Readers of the series are encouraged to contact the Geography Division with comments and suggestions.

    Release date: 2014-08-26

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2014001
    Description:

    The Postal CodesOM by Federal Ridings File, Special Issue (PCFRF Special Issue) refers to the federal electoral districts (FEDs) based on the 2013 Representation Order. The PCFRF Special Issue is a digital file which provides a link between the six-character postal codeOM and Canada's federal electoral districts (which are also known as federal ridings). This special version of the PCFRF links 848,257 active postal codeOM records, existing as of June 2013, to the 338 federal electoral districts of the 2013 Representation Order. These new federal electoral districts will be applied in the first general election called after May 1, 2014.

    The PCFRF Special Issue was created by converting the existing federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order) and their linked postal codes to the new federal electoral districts (2013 Representation Order), transferring the postal codeOM linkages. The conversion process was accomplished using 2011 Census Dissemination Blocks and a best fit methodology for dissemination blocks that were found in more than one federal electoral district.

    Release date: 2014-08-26

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2014001
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics in 2011.

    Release date: 2014-07-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2013001
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics in 2010.

    Release date: 2013-03-26

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2011004
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics in 2009.

    Release date: 2011-10-27

  • Technical products: 92-569-X
    Description:

    The 2006 Census Technical Report on Aboriginal Peoples deals with: (i) Aboriginal ancestry, (ii) Aboriginal identity, (iii) registered Indian status, and (iv) First Nation or Band membership. The report aims to inform users about the complexity of the data and any difficulties that could affect their use. It explains the conceptual framework and definitions used to gather the data, and it discusses factors that could affect data quality. The historical comparability of the data is also discussed.

    Release date: 2010-02-09

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2009002
    Description:

    This working paper describes the preliminary 2011 census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations and is presented for user feedback. The paper briefly describes the factors that have resulted in changes to some of the census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations and includes tables and maps that list and illustrate these changes to their limits and to the component census subdivisions.

    Release date: 2009-08-26

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2009001
    Description:

    This working paper reviews some of the different approaches that Statistics Canada supports to help users segment and measure the urban-rural continuum

    The term urban refers to a concentration of population at a high density. But beyond this basic understanding there is no single universally-accepted view of what constitutes urban.

    Statistics Canada has sought to ensure that users have at their disposal various options to define the urban-rural continuum. This approach allows users to define their own construct of urban in order to meet their specific analytical and policy related needs.

    Release date: 2009-05-01

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2008003
    Description:

    The term ecumene comes from the Greek word oikoumene , which means inhabited land or inhabited world. Geographers generally use the term to refer to land where people have made their permanent home, and to all work areas that are considered occupied and used for agricultural or any other economic purpose.

    This working paper first examines the ecumene concept from a geographic viewpoint and highlights some of the geographic literature. It also examines the cartographic issues, such as the limitations of the choropleth map, and then provides an overview of Statistics Canada's use of the ecumene in its thematic mapping program. Finally, the paper provides details on the development of the population ecumene for the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2008-05-08

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2008002
    Description:

    On November 26 2006, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) held an international workshop on defining and measuring metropolitan regions. The reasons the OECD organized this workshop are listed below.

    1. Metropolitan Regions have become a crucial economic actor in today's highly integrated world. Not only do they play their traditional role of growth poles in their countries but they function as essential nodes of the global economy.2. Policy makers, international organisations and research networks are increasingly called to compare the economic and social performances of Metropolitan Regions across countries. Examples of this work undertaken in international organisation and networks include the UN-Habitat, the EU Urban Audit, ESPON and the OECD Competitive Cities.3. The scope of what we can learn from these international comparisons, however, is limited by the lack of a comparable definition of Metropolitan Regions. Although most countries have their own definitions, these vary significantly from one country to another. Furthermore, in search for higher cross-country comparability, international initiatives have - somehow paradoxically - generated an even larger number of definitions.4. In principle, there is no clear reason to prefer one definition to another. As each definition has been elaborated for a specific analytical purpose, it captures some features of a Metropolitan Region while it tends to overlook others. The issue, rather, is that we do not know the pros and the cons of different definitions nor, most important, the analytical implications of using one definition rather than another. 5. In order to respond to these questions, the OECD hosted an international workshop on 'Defining and Measuring Metropolitan Regions'. The workshop brought together major international organisations (the UN, Eurostat, the World Bank, and the OECD), National Statistical Offices and researchers from this field. The aim of the workshop was to develop some 'guiding principles', which could be agreed upon among the participants and would eventually provide the basis for some form of 'International Guidance' for comparing Metropolitan Regions across countries.

    This working paper was presented at this workshop. It provides the conceptual and methodological basis for the definition of metropolitan areas in Canada and provides a detailed comparison of Canada's methodology to that of the USA. The intent was to encourage discussion regarding Canada's approach to defining metropolitan areas in the effort to identify the 'guiding principles'. It is being made available as a working paper to continue this discussion and to provide background to the user community to encourage dialogue and commentary from the user community regarding Canada's metropolitan area methodology.

    Release date: 2008-02-20

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2008001
    Description:

    An urban area has a minimum population concentration of 1,000 persons and a population density of at least 400 persons per square kilometre, based on the current census population count. All territory outside urban areas is classified as rural. Taken together, urban and rural areas cover all of Canada. For the 2001 Census, there were 913 urban areas. In 2006, the number of urban areas decreased to 895.

    Following the release of urban areas for the 2001 Census, in-depth analysis revealed that the land area of many urban areas had increased substantially and the boundaries of these urban areas were considered to be over-bounded. In response, the boundaries of nearly half of the 2001 urban areas were updated to rectify this over-bounding, either manually or automatically. This paper describes the post-censal update process of 2001 urban areas and addresses the impact on the 2001 modified population counts adjusted to 2006 urban area boundaries.

    The paper also briefly describes and compares the delineation criteria for urban areas from the 1996 and 2001 Censuses.

    Release date: 2008-02-07

  • Technical products: 12-592-X
    Description:

    This reference document presents an overview of the different questions used by Statistics Canada to identify Aboriginal peoples. It is divided into three parts. Part one is a brief description of the data sources and their limitations. Part 2 deals with the 2006 census questions used to identify Aboriginal peoples while Part 3 deals with the identification questions used in the Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS).

    Release date: 2007-06-07

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2007001
    Description:

    Statistics Canada creates files that provide the link between postal codes and the geographic areas by which it disseminates statistical data. By linking postal codes to the Statistics Canada geographic areas, Statistics Canada facilitates the extraction and subsequent aggregation of data for selected geographic areas from files available to users. Users can then take data from Statistics Canada for their areas and tabulate this with other data for these same areas to create a combined statistical profile for these areas.

    An issue has been the methodology used by Statistics Canada to establish the linkage of postal codes to geographic areas. In order to address this issue, Statistics Canada decided to create a conceptual framework on which to base the rules for linking postal codes and Statistics Canada's geographic areas. This working paper presents the conceptual framework and the geocoding rules. The methodology described in this paper will be the basis for linking postal codes to the 2006 Census geographic areas. This paper is presented for feedback from users of Statistics Canada's postal codes related products.

    Release date: 2007-02-12

  • Technical products: 12-002-X20060019254
    Description:

    This article explains how to append census area-level summary data to survey or administrative data. It uses examples from datasets present in Statistics Canada Research Data Centres, but the methods also apply to external datasets. Four examples illustrate common situations faced by researchers: (1) when the survey (or administrative) and census data both contain the same level of geographic identifiers, coded to the same year standard ("vintage") of census geography; (2) when the two files contain geographic identifiers of the same vintage, but at different levels of census geography; (3) when the two files contain data coded to different vintages of census geography; (4) when the survey data are lacking in geographic identifiers, and those identifiers must first be generated from postal codes present on the file. The examples are shown using SAS syntax, but the principles apply to other programming languages or statistical packages.

    Release date: 2006-07-18

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2005002
    Description:

    This paper describes the changes made to the structure of geography information on SLID from reference year 1999 onwards. It goes into reasons for changing to the 2001 Census-based geography, shows how the overlap between the 1991 and 2001 Census-based concepts are handled, provides detail on how the geographic concepts are implemented, discusses a new imputation procedure and finishes with an illustration of the impact of these changes on selected tables.

    Release date: 2005-03-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20030017608
    Description:

    This paper discusses the re-engineering of the United States' 2010 Census through three highly integrated activities: the American Community Survey (ACS), the MAF/TIGER Enhancements Program, and a program of early and comprehensive planning, development and testing for a 2010 Census with only a short form.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20030017607
    Description:

    This paper outlines the changes in collection and processing methodology planned for the 2006 Census in Canada, and focusses on three primary areas: content changes, Internet data collection and outsourcing.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2003002
    Description:

    This working paper describes the preliminary 2006 census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations and is presented for user feedback. The paper briefly describes the factors that have resulted in changes to some of the census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations and includes tables and maps that list and illustrate these changes to their limits and to the component census subdivisions.

    Release date: 2003-07-11

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2003001
    Description:

    The goal of this working paper is to assess how well Canada's current method of delineating Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Census Agglomerations (CAs) reflects the metropolitan nature of these geographic areas according to the facilities and services they provide. The effectiveness of Canada's delineation methodology can be evaluated by applying a functional model to Statistics Canada's CMAs and CAs.

    As a consequence of the research undertaken for this working paper, Statistics Canada has proposed lowering the urban core population threshold it uses to define CMAs: a CA will be promoted to a CMA if it has a total population of at least 100,000, of which 50,000 or more live in the urban core. User consultation on this proposal took place in the fall of 2002 as part of the 2006 Census content determination process.

    Release date: 2003-03-31

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2002001
    Description:

    The 2001 Census defines 27 census metropolitan area (CMAs) and 19 census agglomerations (CAs) with census tracts. This working paper includes three maps for each of these CMAs and CAs. The first map shows the boundary of the CMA/CA and the boundaries of the census subdivision (CSD) components of the CMA/CA for the 1996 Census. The second map shows the transition from 1996 to 2001 (with boundary changes highlighted), and the third map shows the CMA/CA (and component CSDs) as it is defined for the 2001 Census. Accompanying tables list the component census subdivisions and the criteria which they meet to be included in the CMA or CA. The paper describes various factors that can result in changes to the boundaries of CMAs and CAs. For the 2001 Census, municipal restructuring is the factor that has had the greatest impact on the boundaries of some CMAs and CAs.The paper also briefly describes and compares the delineation criteria for metropolitan areas in the United States with those for census metropolitan areas in Canada. An indication is given of the impact on the Canadian CMA program if the American metropolitan area criteria were used.

    Release date: 2002-03-08

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2001001
    Description:

    Traditionally, Statistics Canada uses standard geographic areas as "containers" for the dissemination of statistical data. However, geographic structures are often used as variables in general applications, for example, to document the rural and urban population in a specific area such as an incorporated municipality (census subdivision). They are not often cross-tabulated with each other to illustrate and analyse specific social and economic processes, for example, the settlement patterns of the population inside and outside of larger urban centres broken down by urban and rural areas.The introduction of the census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (MIZ) concept presents additional opportunities to use geographic structures as variables to analyse census data.The objectives of this working paper are to illustrate the advantages of using geographic structures as variables to better analyse social and economic processes and to initiate a discussion in the user community about using these variables and the potential of this largely untapped capability of the Census databases. In order to achieve these objectives, four examples of geography as a variable are presented. The examples include Aboriginal persons living on-reserve and off-reserve in urban and rural areas in Canada, the unemployment rate of persons living in urban and rural areas in Canada, the gross rent of renter households in urban and rural areas in Canada, and the migration flows of persons 15 to 24 years of age between major urban centres and rural and small town areas (MIZ).Our intent is to encourage the use of geographic structures as census variables in order to provide users with the tools that will enable them to more accurately analyse the social and economic processes that take place in the geographic areas of Canada.

    Release date: 2001-03-16

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Reference (32)

Reference (32) (25 of 32 results)

  • Technical products: 98-506-X2017001
    Description:

    The first issue of the Census Program Transformation Project (CPTP) report explains what is new in census research. It introduces the CPTP and its objectives. It provides information on the creation of statistical registers to support the project. The first issue also briefly describes a new combined census methodology to produce population and dwelling counts that is being investigated.

    Release date: 2017-08-11

  • Technical products: 98-506-X
    Description:

    The report will provide updates on the Census Program Transformation Project (CPTP). The CPTP is a research project launched by Statistics Canada to explore how data from administrative sources could be used to replace or complement the enumerated population and dwelling counts. Each issue will cover a different topic as research progresses.

    Release date: 2017-08-11

  • Technical products: 75-005-M2016001
    Description:

    In over 70 years, the methodology and questionnaire, as well as the collection and processing techniques of the Canadian Labour Force Survey have undergone major changes. This document summarizes these changes chronologically and provides references to more detailed information sources. Among the most significant changes were two questionnaire redesigns, which occurred approximately 20 years apart, in 1976 and 1997.

    Release date: 2017-01-06

  • Technical products: 92F0138M
    Description:

    The Geography working paper series is intended to stimulate discussion on a variety of topics covering conceptual, methodological or technical work to support the development and dissemination of the division's data, products and services. Readers of the series are encouraged to contact the Geography Division with comments and suggestions.

    Release date: 2014-08-26

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2014001
    Description:

    The Postal CodesOM by Federal Ridings File, Special Issue (PCFRF Special Issue) refers to the federal electoral districts (FEDs) based on the 2013 Representation Order. The PCFRF Special Issue is a digital file which provides a link between the six-character postal codeOM and Canada's federal electoral districts (which are also known as federal ridings). This special version of the PCFRF links 848,257 active postal codeOM records, existing as of June 2013, to the 338 federal electoral districts of the 2013 Representation Order. These new federal electoral districts will be applied in the first general election called after May 1, 2014.

    The PCFRF Special Issue was created by converting the existing federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order) and their linked postal codes to the new federal electoral districts (2013 Representation Order), transferring the postal codeOM linkages. The conversion process was accomplished using 2011 Census Dissemination Blocks and a best fit methodology for dissemination blocks that were found in more than one federal electoral district.

    Release date: 2014-08-26

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2014001
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics in 2011.

    Release date: 2014-07-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2013001
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics in 2010.

    Release date: 2013-03-26

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2011004
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics in 2009.

    Release date: 2011-10-27

  • Technical products: 92-569-X
    Description:

    The 2006 Census Technical Report on Aboriginal Peoples deals with: (i) Aboriginal ancestry, (ii) Aboriginal identity, (iii) registered Indian status, and (iv) First Nation or Band membership. The report aims to inform users about the complexity of the data and any difficulties that could affect their use. It explains the conceptual framework and definitions used to gather the data, and it discusses factors that could affect data quality. The historical comparability of the data is also discussed.

    Release date: 2010-02-09

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2009002
    Description:

    This working paper describes the preliminary 2011 census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations and is presented for user feedback. The paper briefly describes the factors that have resulted in changes to some of the census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations and includes tables and maps that list and illustrate these changes to their limits and to the component census subdivisions.

    Release date: 2009-08-26

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2009001
    Description:

    This working paper reviews some of the different approaches that Statistics Canada supports to help users segment and measure the urban-rural continuum

    The term urban refers to a concentration of population at a high density. But beyond this basic understanding there is no single universally-accepted view of what constitutes urban.

    Statistics Canada has sought to ensure that users have at their disposal various options to define the urban-rural continuum. This approach allows users to define their own construct of urban in order to meet their specific analytical and policy related needs.

    Release date: 2009-05-01

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2008003
    Description:

    The term ecumene comes from the Greek word oikoumene , which means inhabited land or inhabited world. Geographers generally use the term to refer to land where people have made their permanent home, and to all work areas that are considered occupied and used for agricultural or any other economic purpose.

    This working paper first examines the ecumene concept from a geographic viewpoint and highlights some of the geographic literature. It also examines the cartographic issues, such as the limitations of the choropleth map, and then provides an overview of Statistics Canada's use of the ecumene in its thematic mapping program. Finally, the paper provides details on the development of the population ecumene for the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2008-05-08

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2008002
    Description:

    On November 26 2006, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) held an international workshop on defining and measuring metropolitan regions. The reasons the OECD organized this workshop are listed below.

    1. Metropolitan Regions have become a crucial economic actor in today's highly integrated world. Not only do they play their traditional role of growth poles in their countries but they function as essential nodes of the global economy.2. Policy makers, international organisations and research networks are increasingly called to compare the economic and social performances of Metropolitan Regions across countries. Examples of this work undertaken in international organisation and networks include the UN-Habitat, the EU Urban Audit, ESPON and the OECD Competitive Cities.3. The scope of what we can learn from these international comparisons, however, is limited by the lack of a comparable definition of Metropolitan Regions. Although most countries have their own definitions, these vary significantly from one country to another. Furthermore, in search for higher cross-country comparability, international initiatives have - somehow paradoxically - generated an even larger number of definitions.4. In principle, there is no clear reason to prefer one definition to another. As each definition has been elaborated for a specific analytical purpose, it captures some features of a Metropolitan Region while it tends to overlook others. The issue, rather, is that we do not know the pros and the cons of different definitions nor, most important, the analytical implications of using one definition rather than another. 5. In order to respond to these questions, the OECD hosted an international workshop on 'Defining and Measuring Metropolitan Regions'. The workshop brought together major international organisations (the UN, Eurostat, the World Bank, and the OECD), National Statistical Offices and researchers from this field. The aim of the workshop was to develop some 'guiding principles', which could be agreed upon among the participants and would eventually provide the basis for some form of 'International Guidance' for comparing Metropolitan Regions across countries.

    This working paper was presented at this workshop. It provides the conceptual and methodological basis for the definition of metropolitan areas in Canada and provides a detailed comparison of Canada's methodology to that of the USA. The intent was to encourage discussion regarding Canada's approach to defining metropolitan areas in the effort to identify the 'guiding principles'. It is being made available as a working paper to continue this discussion and to provide background to the user community to encourage dialogue and commentary from the user community regarding Canada's metropolitan area methodology.

    Release date: 2008-02-20

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2008001
    Description:

    An urban area has a minimum population concentration of 1,000 persons and a population density of at least 400 persons per square kilometre, based on the current census population count. All territory outside urban areas is classified as rural. Taken together, urban and rural areas cover all of Canada. For the 2001 Census, there were 913 urban areas. In 2006, the number of urban areas decreased to 895.

    Following the release of urban areas for the 2001 Census, in-depth analysis revealed that the land area of many urban areas had increased substantially and the boundaries of these urban areas were considered to be over-bounded. In response, the boundaries of nearly half of the 2001 urban areas were updated to rectify this over-bounding, either manually or automatically. This paper describes the post-censal update process of 2001 urban areas and addresses the impact on the 2001 modified population counts adjusted to 2006 urban area boundaries.

    The paper also briefly describes and compares the delineation criteria for urban areas from the 1996 and 2001 Censuses.

    Release date: 2008-02-07

  • Technical products: 12-592-X
    Description:

    This reference document presents an overview of the different questions used by Statistics Canada to identify Aboriginal peoples. It is divided into three parts. Part one is a brief description of the data sources and their limitations. Part 2 deals with the 2006 census questions used to identify Aboriginal peoples while Part 3 deals with the identification questions used in the Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS).

    Release date: 2007-06-07

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2007001
    Description:

    Statistics Canada creates files that provide the link between postal codes and the geographic areas by which it disseminates statistical data. By linking postal codes to the Statistics Canada geographic areas, Statistics Canada facilitates the extraction and subsequent aggregation of data for selected geographic areas from files available to users. Users can then take data from Statistics Canada for their areas and tabulate this with other data for these same areas to create a combined statistical profile for these areas.

    An issue has been the methodology used by Statistics Canada to establish the linkage of postal codes to geographic areas. In order to address this issue, Statistics Canada decided to create a conceptual framework on which to base the rules for linking postal codes and Statistics Canada's geographic areas. This working paper presents the conceptual framework and the geocoding rules. The methodology described in this paper will be the basis for linking postal codes to the 2006 Census geographic areas. This paper is presented for feedback from users of Statistics Canada's postal codes related products.

    Release date: 2007-02-12

  • Technical products: 12-002-X20060019254
    Description:

    This article explains how to append census area-level summary data to survey or administrative data. It uses examples from datasets present in Statistics Canada Research Data Centres, but the methods also apply to external datasets. Four examples illustrate common situations faced by researchers: (1) when the survey (or administrative) and census data both contain the same level of geographic identifiers, coded to the same year standard ("vintage") of census geography; (2) when the two files contain geographic identifiers of the same vintage, but at different levels of census geography; (3) when the two files contain data coded to different vintages of census geography; (4) when the survey data are lacking in geographic identifiers, and those identifiers must first be generated from postal codes present on the file. The examples are shown using SAS syntax, but the principles apply to other programming languages or statistical packages.

    Release date: 2006-07-18

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2005002
    Description:

    This paper describes the changes made to the structure of geography information on SLID from reference year 1999 onwards. It goes into reasons for changing to the 2001 Census-based geography, shows how the overlap between the 1991 and 2001 Census-based concepts are handled, provides detail on how the geographic concepts are implemented, discusses a new imputation procedure and finishes with an illustration of the impact of these changes on selected tables.

    Release date: 2005-03-31

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20030017608
    Description:

    This paper discusses the re-engineering of the United States' 2010 Census through three highly integrated activities: the American Community Survey (ACS), the MAF/TIGER Enhancements Program, and a program of early and comprehensive planning, development and testing for a 2010 Census with only a short form.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20030017607
    Description:

    This paper outlines the changes in collection and processing methodology planned for the 2006 Census in Canada, and focusses on three primary areas: content changes, Internet data collection and outsourcing.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2003002
    Description:

    This working paper describes the preliminary 2006 census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations and is presented for user feedback. The paper briefly describes the factors that have resulted in changes to some of the census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations and includes tables and maps that list and illustrate these changes to their limits and to the component census subdivisions.

    Release date: 2003-07-11

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2003001
    Description:

    The goal of this working paper is to assess how well Canada's current method of delineating Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Census Agglomerations (CAs) reflects the metropolitan nature of these geographic areas according to the facilities and services they provide. The effectiveness of Canada's delineation methodology can be evaluated by applying a functional model to Statistics Canada's CMAs and CAs.

    As a consequence of the research undertaken for this working paper, Statistics Canada has proposed lowering the urban core population threshold it uses to define CMAs: a CA will be promoted to a CMA if it has a total population of at least 100,000, of which 50,000 or more live in the urban core. User consultation on this proposal took place in the fall of 2002 as part of the 2006 Census content determination process.

    Release date: 2003-03-31

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2002001
    Description:

    The 2001 Census defines 27 census metropolitan area (CMAs) and 19 census agglomerations (CAs) with census tracts. This working paper includes three maps for each of these CMAs and CAs. The first map shows the boundary of the CMA/CA and the boundaries of the census subdivision (CSD) components of the CMA/CA for the 1996 Census. The second map shows the transition from 1996 to 2001 (with boundary changes highlighted), and the third map shows the CMA/CA (and component CSDs) as it is defined for the 2001 Census. Accompanying tables list the component census subdivisions and the criteria which they meet to be included in the CMA or CA. The paper describes various factors that can result in changes to the boundaries of CMAs and CAs. For the 2001 Census, municipal restructuring is the factor that has had the greatest impact on the boundaries of some CMAs and CAs.The paper also briefly describes and compares the delineation criteria for metropolitan areas in the United States with those for census metropolitan areas in Canada. An indication is given of the impact on the Canadian CMA program if the American metropolitan area criteria were used.

    Release date: 2002-03-08

  • Technical products: 92F0138M2001001
    Description:

    Traditionally, Statistics Canada uses standard geographic areas as "containers" for the dissemination of statistical data. However, geographic structures are often used as variables in general applications, for example, to document the rural and urban population in a specific area such as an incorporated municipality (census subdivision). They are not often cross-tabulated with each other to illustrate and analyse specific social and economic processes, for example, the settlement patterns of the population inside and outside of larger urban centres broken down by urban and rural areas.The introduction of the census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (MIZ) concept presents additional opportunities to use geographic structures as variables to analyse census data.The objectives of this working paper are to illustrate the advantages of using geographic structures as variables to better analyse social and economic processes and to initiate a discussion in the user community about using these variables and the potential of this largely untapped capability of the Census databases. In order to achieve these objectives, four examples of geography as a variable are presented. The examples include Aboriginal persons living on-reserve and off-reserve in urban and rural areas in Canada, the unemployment rate of persons living in urban and rural areas in Canada, the gross rent of renter households in urban and rural areas in Canada, and the migration flows of persons 15 to 24 years of age between major urban centres and rural and small town areas (MIZ).Our intent is to encourage the use of geographic structures as census variables in order to provide users with the tools that will enable them to more accurately analyse the social and economic processes that take place in the geographic areas of Canada.

    Release date: 2001-03-16

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