Statistics by subject – Aboriginal peoples

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All (9)

All (9) (9 of 9 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201400211902
    Description:

    Based on 2004/2005 to 2009/2010 data from the Discharge Abstract Database, this study examines associations between unintentional injury hospitalizations and socio-economic status and location relative to an urban core in Dissemination Areas with a high percentage of First Nations identity residents versus a low percentage of Aboriginal identity residents based on the predominant Aboriginal group.

    Release date: 2014-02-19

  • Table: 99-012-X201100311849
    Description:

    This NHS in Brief focuses on educational attainment (highest certificate, diploma or degree) among First Nations people, Métis and Inuit in Canada in 2011.

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300411776
    Description:

    Based on the results of Statistics Canada's 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey, this article presents an overview of how often First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children and Inuit children aged 2 to 5 consume various types of food, including foods considered traditional or country among Aboriginal people.

    Release date: 2013-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200111624
    Description:

    This study examines parent- /guardian-reported data about the general health, chronic conditions and physical limitations of First Nations children living off reserve and Métis children younger than age 6. The data are from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey.

    Release date: 2012-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100111403
    Description:

    Data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey were used to compare rates of active and moderately active leisure time (versus inactive) among First Nations people off reserve, Métis and Inuit with rates among non-Aboriginal people.

    Release date: 2011-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211344
    Description:

    Previous research has shown that child care has an impact on children's social and developmental outcomes. However, little is known about child care for First Nations, Métis and Inuit children. The purpose of this study is to describe non-parental child care for First Nations children living off reserve, Métis, and Inuit children in Canada, including the cultural aspects within the care environment. In addition, the availability of culturally-relevant activities and language spoken in care were examined as predictors of children's outcomes.

    Release date: 2010-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211286
    Description:

    Participation in extracurricular activities, including both sports and cultural activities, can be associated with positive benefits for children. The purpose of the current study was to examine participation in sports and cultural activities for Inuit, Métis and off-reserve First Nations children aged 6 to 14 years. Socio-demographic factors including the child's basic characteristics, cultural factors and family characteristics were also examined to determine any associations with participation in sports and cultural activities.

    Release date: 2010-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800110463
    Description:

    This article uses a geographic-based approach to estimate life expectancy in areas where at least 33% of residents were Inuit. The data are from the Canadian Mortality Database and the Census of Canada.

    Release date: 2008-01-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201400211902
    Description:

    Based on 2004/2005 to 2009/2010 data from the Discharge Abstract Database, this study examines associations between unintentional injury hospitalizations and socio-economic status and location relative to an urban core in Dissemination Areas with a high percentage of First Nations identity residents versus a low percentage of Aboriginal identity residents based on the predominant Aboriginal group.

    Release date: 2014-02-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300411776
    Description:

    Based on the results of Statistics Canada's 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey, this article presents an overview of how often First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children and Inuit children aged 2 to 5 consume various types of food, including foods considered traditional or country among Aboriginal people.

    Release date: 2013-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200111624
    Description:

    This study examines parent- /guardian-reported data about the general health, chronic conditions and physical limitations of First Nations children living off reserve and Métis children younger than age 6. The data are from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey.

    Release date: 2012-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100111403
    Description:

    Data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey were used to compare rates of active and moderately active leisure time (versus inactive) among First Nations people off reserve, Métis and Inuit with rates among non-Aboriginal people.

    Release date: 2011-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211344
    Description:

    Previous research has shown that child care has an impact on children's social and developmental outcomes. However, little is known about child care for First Nations, Métis and Inuit children. The purpose of this study is to describe non-parental child care for First Nations children living off reserve, Métis, and Inuit children in Canada, including the cultural aspects within the care environment. In addition, the availability of culturally-relevant activities and language spoken in care were examined as predictors of children's outcomes.

    Release date: 2010-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211286
    Description:

    Participation in extracurricular activities, including both sports and cultural activities, can be associated with positive benefits for children. The purpose of the current study was to examine participation in sports and cultural activities for Inuit, Métis and off-reserve First Nations children aged 6 to 14 years. Socio-demographic factors including the child's basic characteristics, cultural factors and family characteristics were also examined to determine any associations with participation in sports and cultural activities.

    Release date: 2010-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800110463
    Description:

    This article uses a geographic-based approach to estimate life expectancy in areas where at least 33% of residents were Inuit. The data are from the Canadian Mortality Database and the Census of Canada.

    Release date: 2008-01-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

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