Statistics by subject – Aboriginal peoples

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (15)

All (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201701254891
    Description:

    The objective of this analysis is to determine if Métis are more likely than non-Aboriginal people to be hospitalized for ambulatory care sensitive conditions and whether differences persist after adjustment for socioeconomic and geographic factors.

    Release date: 2017-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201701154886
    Description:

    This study examines perinatal outcomes among First Nations, Inuit and Métis. The objective is to describe and compare rates of preterm birth, small-for-gestational age birth, large-for-gestational age birth, stillbirth and infant mortality in the three Indigenous groups and the non-Indigenous population.

    Release date: 2017-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700714844
    Description:

    This study provides national counts (excluding Quebec) of acute care hospitalizations and the leading diagnoses for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children (ages 0 to 9) and youth (ages 10 to 19). Data are presented for First Nations people living on and off reserve, Métis, and Inuit living in Inuit Nunangat. The analysis is based on socio-demographic information (including Aboriginal identity) from the 2006 Census that was linked to hospital discharge records.

    Release date: 2017-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600814647
    Description:

    This study is based on 2006 Census (long-form) socio-demographic information (including Aboriginal identity) that was linked to the Discharge Abstract Database to create a sample for analysis from all provinces and territories except Quebec. The purpose is to provide national figures on acute care hospitalizations of Aboriginal (First Nations living on and off reserve, Métis, Inuit in Inuit Nunangat) and non-Aboriginal people.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201400211902
    Description:

    Based on 2004/2005 to 2009/2010 data from the Discharge Abstract Database, this study examines associations between unintentional injury hospitalizations and socio-economic status and location relative to an urban core in Dissemination Areas with a high percentage of First Nations identity residents versus a low percentage of Aboriginal identity residents based on the predominant Aboriginal group.

    Release date: 2014-02-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300711853
    Description:

    This study uses an area-based approach to identify acute myocardial infarction hospital patients who live in Dissemination Areas with relatively high percentages of First Nations residents. Within the patient cohort, procedures received during the hospital admission were identified.

    Release date: 2013-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300411776
    Description:

    Based on the results of Statistics Canada's 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey, this article presents an overview of how often First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children and Inuit children aged 2 to 5 consume various types of food, including foods considered traditional or country among Aboriginal people.

    Release date: 2013-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200411741
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey to compare physical and mental health outcomes of 2- to 5-year-old Inuit children of teenage and older mothers.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200311699
    Description:

    Rates of unintentional injury hospitalization were calculated for 0- to 19-year-olds in census Dissemination Areas (DAs) where at least 33% of residents reported an Aboriginal identity. DAs were classified as high-percentage First Nations, Métis or Inuit identity based on the predominant group.

    Release date: 2012-08-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200311695
    Description:

    This study examines disparities in mortality between 1- to 19-year-old residents of Inuit Nunangat and the rest of Canada from 1994 to 2008. Mortality rates are calculated by cause of death.

    Release date: 2012-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100211435
    Description:

    Data from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey - Nutrition were used to examine the relationships between household food security and self-reported health, well-being and health behaviours in a sample of Aboriginal adults living off reserve.

    Release date: 2011-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211344
    Description:

    Previous research has shown that child care has an impact on children's social and developmental outcomes. However, little is known about child care for First Nations, Métis and Inuit children. The purpose of this study is to describe non-parental child care for First Nations children living off reserve, Métis, and Inuit children in Canada, including the cultural aspects within the care environment. In addition, the availability of culturally-relevant activities and language spoken in care were examined as predictors of children's outcomes.

    Release date: 2010-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111142
    Description:

    Métis peoples make up one third of the Aboriginal population in Canada (about 390,000 people in 2006). Using the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (15 and older) and Métis Supplement this article explores various cultural activities of the Métis population. More specifically, it considers involvement in traditional activities, such as: arts and crafts, hunting, fishing, trapping, and gathering wild vegetation. It also explores Aboriginal language use, involvement in Métis-specific organizations, and spiritual and religious practices. Findings are presented by sex, age, and region.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20040018748
    Description:

    Given the small numbers of Aboriginal people, survey sample sizes are usually too small to permit sufficient analysis of these small groups. This paper discusses efforts that are being made by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics in this regard.

    Release date: 2005-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201701254891
    Description:

    The objective of this analysis is to determine if Métis are more likely than non-Aboriginal people to be hospitalized for ambulatory care sensitive conditions and whether differences persist after adjustment for socioeconomic and geographic factors.

    Release date: 2017-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201701154886
    Description:

    This study examines perinatal outcomes among First Nations, Inuit and Métis. The objective is to describe and compare rates of preterm birth, small-for-gestational age birth, large-for-gestational age birth, stillbirth and infant mortality in the three Indigenous groups and the non-Indigenous population.

    Release date: 2017-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700714844
    Description:

    This study provides national counts (excluding Quebec) of acute care hospitalizations and the leading diagnoses for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children (ages 0 to 9) and youth (ages 10 to 19). Data are presented for First Nations people living on and off reserve, Métis, and Inuit living in Inuit Nunangat. The analysis is based on socio-demographic information (including Aboriginal identity) from the 2006 Census that was linked to hospital discharge records.

    Release date: 2017-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600814647
    Description:

    This study is based on 2006 Census (long-form) socio-demographic information (including Aboriginal identity) that was linked to the Discharge Abstract Database to create a sample for analysis from all provinces and territories except Quebec. The purpose is to provide national figures on acute care hospitalizations of Aboriginal (First Nations living on and off reserve, Métis, Inuit in Inuit Nunangat) and non-Aboriginal people.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201400211902
    Description:

    Based on 2004/2005 to 2009/2010 data from the Discharge Abstract Database, this study examines associations between unintentional injury hospitalizations and socio-economic status and location relative to an urban core in Dissemination Areas with a high percentage of First Nations identity residents versus a low percentage of Aboriginal identity residents based on the predominant Aboriginal group.

    Release date: 2014-02-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300711853
    Description:

    This study uses an area-based approach to identify acute myocardial infarction hospital patients who live in Dissemination Areas with relatively high percentages of First Nations residents. Within the patient cohort, procedures received during the hospital admission were identified.

    Release date: 2013-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300411776
    Description:

    Based on the results of Statistics Canada's 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey, this article presents an overview of how often First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children and Inuit children aged 2 to 5 consume various types of food, including foods considered traditional or country among Aboriginal people.

    Release date: 2013-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200411741
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey to compare physical and mental health outcomes of 2- to 5-year-old Inuit children of teenage and older mothers.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200311699
    Description:

    Rates of unintentional injury hospitalization were calculated for 0- to 19-year-olds in census Dissemination Areas (DAs) where at least 33% of residents reported an Aboriginal identity. DAs were classified as high-percentage First Nations, Métis or Inuit identity based on the predominant group.

    Release date: 2012-08-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200311695
    Description:

    This study examines disparities in mortality between 1- to 19-year-old residents of Inuit Nunangat and the rest of Canada from 1994 to 2008. Mortality rates are calculated by cause of death.

    Release date: 2012-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100211435
    Description:

    Data from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey - Nutrition were used to examine the relationships between household food security and self-reported health, well-being and health behaviours in a sample of Aboriginal adults living off reserve.

    Release date: 2011-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211344
    Description:

    Previous research has shown that child care has an impact on children's social and developmental outcomes. However, little is known about child care for First Nations, Métis and Inuit children. The purpose of this study is to describe non-parental child care for First Nations children living off reserve, Métis, and Inuit children in Canada, including the cultural aspects within the care environment. In addition, the availability of culturally-relevant activities and language spoken in care were examined as predictors of children's outcomes.

    Release date: 2010-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111142
    Description:

    Métis peoples make up one third of the Aboriginal population in Canada (about 390,000 people in 2006). Using the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (15 and older) and Métis Supplement this article explores various cultural activities of the Métis population. More specifically, it considers involvement in traditional activities, such as: arts and crafts, hunting, fishing, trapping, and gathering wild vegetation. It also explores Aboriginal language use, involvement in Métis-specific organizations, and spiritual and religious practices. Findings are presented by sex, age, and region.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: