Statistics by subject – Aboriginal peoples

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All (18)

All (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114547
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Household Survey (NHS) to examine the living arrangements of Aboriginal children aged 14 and under, and includes results about the proportion of Aboriginal children who lived with lone parents, with their grandparents, or in a stepfamily. The study also provides key statistics about Aboriginal foster children.

    Release date: 2016-04-13

  • Table: 98-314-X201100311725
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The three articles linked to the language release are entitled 'French and the francophonie,' ' Immigrant languages in Canada,' and ' Aboriginal languages in Canada.'

    Release date: 2012-10-24

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100411560
    Description:

    This report calculates remaining life expectancy at age 25 and the probability of survival to age 75 during the 1991-to-2006 period by income adequacy, education and residence in shelters, rooming houses and hotels, and for Registered Indians, non-Status Indians and Métis.

    Release date: 2011-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100111408
    Description:

    The 1991 to 2001 Canadian census mortality follow-up study tracked a 15% sample of adults aged 25 or older. This study examined mortality among Métis, non-Status Indians and non-Aboriginal adults aged 25 to 74. Age-standardized rates of potential years of life lost were calculated, based on the number of person-years at risk before age 75.

    Release date: 2011-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100111409
    Description:

    The 1991 to 2001 Canadian census mortality follow-up study tracked a 15% sample of adults aged 25 or older. This study examined mortality among Status Indians and non-Aboriginal adults aged 25 to 74. Age-standardized rates of potential years of life lost were calculated, based on the number of person-years at risk before age 75.

    Release date: 2011-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-643-X201000111278
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides a language profile of Inuit children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Inuit children's experiences with the Inuit language. Data include the ability to speak and understand the Inuit language and the extent to which Inuit children are exposed to the language at home and in the community. Family characteristics associated with Inuit language learning are presented. Finally, the hopes and expectations of parents regarding their children's acquisition of the Inuit language are described. Data are provided at the Canada level with some breakdowns for Inuit regions.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-643-X201000111277
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides an Aboriginal language profile of Métis children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Métis children's experiences with Aboriginal languages. Data include the ability to speak and understand an Aboriginal language, along with knowledge of English and French. A comparison of first languages learned across the generations is provided. Specific Aboriginal languages used most widely by Métis children are noted. Other indicators include the extent to which Métis children are exposed to Aboriginal languages at home and in the community. Family characteristics associated with Aboriginal language learning are also presented. Finally, the hopes and expectations of parents regarding their children's acquisition of an Aboriginal language are described. Data are generally provided at the Canada level with some provincial breakdowns.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-643-X201000111276
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides an Aboriginal language profile of off-reserve First Nations children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young off-reserve First Nations children's experiences with Aboriginal languages. Data include their ability to speak and understand an Aboriginal language, and their exposure to Aboriginal languages at home and in the community. Family characteristics associated with Aboriginal language knowledge are also presented. Finally, the hopes and expectations of parents regarding their children's acquisition of an Aboriginal language are described.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110770
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 2006 Census of Canada to look at the use of non-official languages at work among immigrants. Owing to the growing contribution that immigrants are making to Canada's labour force, languages other than English and French are being used more often in Canadian work places. The article examines which languages are used most often. It also looks at the impact of age, gender, year of immigration, education, official language ability and the presence of others who speak the mother tongue in the community where they work, on the likelihood that immigrants will use a non-official language on the job.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060039199
    Description:

    Using data from victimization, police and corrections surveys, this report provides a statistical portrait of the extent and nature of victimization and offending among Aboriginal people in Canada during the past few years.

    The report finds that Aboriginal people are much more likely than non-Aboriginal people to be victims of violent crime and spousal violence. Aboriginal people are also highly overrepresented as offenders charged in police-reported homicide incidents and those admitted into the correctional system. Furthermore, crime rates are notably higher on-reserve compared to crime rates in the rest of Canada.

    The report also examines particular factors which could be related to the high levels of representation in the criminal justice system. These factors include: Aboriginal people are younger on average; their unemployment rates are higher and incomes lower; they have lower levels of educational attainment; they are more likely to live in crowded conditions; they have higher residential mobility; and Aboriginal children are more likely to be members of a lone-parent family.

    Information on Aboriginal peoples fear of crime and their perceptions of the justice system as well as their experiences with discrimination are presented, along with a description of some of the programs and services that have been developed as a response to the specialized needs of Aboriginal people in the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2006-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040027786
    Description:

    This Health Reports article presents in 2000-2001 and 2003, about 20% of the off-reserve Aboriginal population in the provinces reported having had an activity-limiting injury in the past year, compared with 14% of other provincial residents. In the territories, injury rates of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people did not differ significantly.

    Release date: 2005-03-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040037734
    Description:

    This article describes the well-being of off-reserve Aboriginal children aged 14 and under, using data from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) to focus on off-reserve Aboriginal children with respect to health and well-being, education, and learning and use of Aboriginal languages. It is adapted from A Portrait of Aboriginal Children Living in Non-reserve Areas: Results from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-597-XWE).

    Release date: 2004-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030046805
    Description:

    This article uses several different health, education, housing and language indicators to contribute to an understanding of the experiences and living conditions of non-reserve Aboriginal people.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036396
    Description:

    This article focusses on the change in unmet health care needs reported by Canadians from 1998 to 2001, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey and the National Population Health Survey.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20020016323
    Description:

    This article compares the off-reserve Aboriginal population with the rest of the Canadian population in terms of health status, health behaviours, and health care utilization.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044418
    Description:

    This article examines the educational achievements for young Aboriginal men and women.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950032453
    Description:

    In every province and territory, abused women and their children can find refuge in a variety of facilities that provide residential services. In 1994-95, transition homes and similar institutions recorded more than 85,000 admissions. Most of the women admitted were escaping physical abuse by a current or previous spouse or common-law partner.

    Release date: 1996-02-09

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 98-314-X201100311725
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The three articles linked to the language release are entitled 'French and the francophonie,' ' Immigrant languages in Canada,' and ' Aboriginal languages in Canada.'

    Release date: 2012-10-24

Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114547
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Household Survey (NHS) to examine the living arrangements of Aboriginal children aged 14 and under, and includes results about the proportion of Aboriginal children who lived with lone parents, with their grandparents, or in a stepfamily. The study also provides key statistics about Aboriginal foster children.

    Release date: 2016-04-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100411560
    Description:

    This report calculates remaining life expectancy at age 25 and the probability of survival to age 75 during the 1991-to-2006 period by income adequacy, education and residence in shelters, rooming houses and hotels, and for Registered Indians, non-Status Indians and Métis.

    Release date: 2011-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100111408
    Description:

    The 1991 to 2001 Canadian census mortality follow-up study tracked a 15% sample of adults aged 25 or older. This study examined mortality among Métis, non-Status Indians and non-Aboriginal adults aged 25 to 74. Age-standardized rates of potential years of life lost were calculated, based on the number of person-years at risk before age 75.

    Release date: 2011-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100111409
    Description:

    The 1991 to 2001 Canadian census mortality follow-up study tracked a 15% sample of adults aged 25 or older. This study examined mortality among Status Indians and non-Aboriginal adults aged 25 to 74. Age-standardized rates of potential years of life lost were calculated, based on the number of person-years at risk before age 75.

    Release date: 2011-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-643-X201000111278
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides a language profile of Inuit children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Inuit children's experiences with the Inuit language. Data include the ability to speak and understand the Inuit language and the extent to which Inuit children are exposed to the language at home and in the community. Family characteristics associated with Inuit language learning are presented. Finally, the hopes and expectations of parents regarding their children's acquisition of the Inuit language are described. Data are provided at the Canada level with some breakdowns for Inuit regions.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-643-X201000111277
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides an Aboriginal language profile of Métis children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Métis children's experiences with Aboriginal languages. Data include the ability to speak and understand an Aboriginal language, along with knowledge of English and French. A comparison of first languages learned across the generations is provided. Specific Aboriginal languages used most widely by Métis children are noted. Other indicators include the extent to which Métis children are exposed to Aboriginal languages at home and in the community. Family characteristics associated with Aboriginal language learning are also presented. Finally, the hopes and expectations of parents regarding their children's acquisition of an Aboriginal language are described. Data are generally provided at the Canada level with some provincial breakdowns.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-643-X201000111276
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides an Aboriginal language profile of off-reserve First Nations children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young off-reserve First Nations children's experiences with Aboriginal languages. Data include their ability to speak and understand an Aboriginal language, and their exposure to Aboriginal languages at home and in the community. Family characteristics associated with Aboriginal language knowledge are also presented. Finally, the hopes and expectations of parents regarding their children's acquisition of an Aboriginal language are described.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110770
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 2006 Census of Canada to look at the use of non-official languages at work among immigrants. Owing to the growing contribution that immigrants are making to Canada's labour force, languages other than English and French are being used more often in Canadian work places. The article examines which languages are used most often. It also looks at the impact of age, gender, year of immigration, education, official language ability and the presence of others who speak the mother tongue in the community where they work, on the likelihood that immigrants will use a non-official language on the job.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060039199
    Description:

    Using data from victimization, police and corrections surveys, this report provides a statistical portrait of the extent and nature of victimization and offending among Aboriginal people in Canada during the past few years.

    The report finds that Aboriginal people are much more likely than non-Aboriginal people to be victims of violent crime and spousal violence. Aboriginal people are also highly overrepresented as offenders charged in police-reported homicide incidents and those admitted into the correctional system. Furthermore, crime rates are notably higher on-reserve compared to crime rates in the rest of Canada.

    The report also examines particular factors which could be related to the high levels of representation in the criminal justice system. These factors include: Aboriginal people are younger on average; their unemployment rates are higher and incomes lower; they have lower levels of educational attainment; they are more likely to live in crowded conditions; they have higher residential mobility; and Aboriginal children are more likely to be members of a lone-parent family.

    Information on Aboriginal peoples fear of crime and their perceptions of the justice system as well as their experiences with discrimination are presented, along with a description of some of the programs and services that have been developed as a response to the specialized needs of Aboriginal people in the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2006-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040027786
    Description:

    This Health Reports article presents in 2000-2001 and 2003, about 20% of the off-reserve Aboriginal population in the provinces reported having had an activity-limiting injury in the past year, compared with 14% of other provincial residents. In the territories, injury rates of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people did not differ significantly.

    Release date: 2005-03-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040037734
    Description:

    This article describes the well-being of off-reserve Aboriginal children aged 14 and under, using data from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) to focus on off-reserve Aboriginal children with respect to health and well-being, education, and learning and use of Aboriginal languages. It is adapted from A Portrait of Aboriginal Children Living in Non-reserve Areas: Results from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-597-XWE).

    Release date: 2004-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030046805
    Description:

    This article uses several different health, education, housing and language indicators to contribute to an understanding of the experiences and living conditions of non-reserve Aboriginal people.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036396
    Description:

    This article focusses on the change in unmet health care needs reported by Canadians from 1998 to 2001, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey and the National Population Health Survey.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20020016323
    Description:

    This article compares the off-reserve Aboriginal population with the rest of the Canadian population in terms of health status, health behaviours, and health care utilization.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044418
    Description:

    This article examines the educational achievements for young Aboriginal men and women.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950032453
    Description:

    In every province and territory, abused women and their children can find refuge in a variety of facilities that provide residential services. In 1994-95, transition homes and similar institutions recorded more than 85,000 admissions. Most of the women admitted were escaping physical abuse by a current or previous spouse or common-law partner.

    Release date: 1996-02-09

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