Statistics by subject – Business, consumer and property services

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (92)

All (92) (25 of 92 results)

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2017002
    Description:

    This working paper presents a methodology to measure remoteness at the community level. The method takes into account some of the recent literature on the subject, as well as new computational opportunities provided by the integration of official statistics with data from non-official statistical sources. The approach that was used in the computations accounts for multiple points of access to services; it also establishes a continuum between communities with different transportation infrastructures and connectivity while at the same time retaining the information on the community transportation infrastructures in the database. In addition, a method to implement accessibility measures to selected services is also outlined and a sample of accessibility measures are computed.

    Release date: 2017-05-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-629-X2015021
    Description:

    This short tutorial will show you some basics on how to find business data on the Statistics Canada website, and how to put it to work so you can get the answers you need.

    Release date: 2014-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-629-X2015023
    Description:

    A wealth of local business information at your fingertips!

    Release date: 2013-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008003
    Description:

    Using Statistics Canada's Business Register, this paper investigates the pattern of business establishments in each of the different census metropolitan and census agglomeration influenced zones across rural Canada.

    Release date: 2010-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009083
    Description:

    This article examines trends in the legal and accounting industries, and highlights key characteristics of these industries in relation to the professional sector as a whole and to the Canadian economy. Trends in employment, earnings, output as measured by gross domestic product, capital expenditures, rates of self-employment and of incorporation are investigated. Also socio-economic characteristics of the workforce in legal and accounting services industries are examined.

    Release date: 2009-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110673
    Description:

    Teenagers are not sitting in front of the television all day, but they are keeping busy at other activities! The General Social Survey (GSS) collected time use data in 1986, 1992, 1998 and 2005. Time-use data examines time use over a 24 hour period on a diary day. The analysis in this fact sheet looks at time use by participation rate (number of people reporting an activity) and by the number of minutes spent on an activity. The data show that teenagers aged 15 to 19 were spending less time in front of the television but were spending more time working at a paid job and using the Internet in 2005.

    Release date: 2008-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2008053
    Description:

    With the growth of the service economy, business support services have become more important to the Canadian economy. Changes in business practices such as outsourcing have been made possible by advances in telecommunications technology. Consequently, the business support services industry, which includes credit agencies, telephone call centres, and document preparation and business service centres, has experienced steady growth. Telephone call centres in particular have been identified as potential catalysts for regional development. Research in this area has tended to deal with employment issues (e.g. job creation) or with case studies of firms or communities. Using an industry life cycle approach, this study examines the changing location of telephone call centres.

    Release date: 2008-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060089610
    Description:

    This study examines the frequency with which Canadians follow news and current affairs, the variety of media sources they use and whether this affects their level of civic participation, as measured by involvement in non-voting political activities.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2007052
    Description:

    This paper shows how peoples decisions on whether to own or rent their residences impacted residential landlords and their market. It will also examine how the characteristics of renters have changed since 1986, and offer a brief profile of the residential real estate lessors industry.

    Release date: 2007-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029239
    Description:

    Since the launch of cellular services in the mid-1980s, mobile phones have largely been a complement to the traditional phone line but that is beginning to change. Recent statistics show that more and more of those making plans for the evening have not only chosen to stay connected wherever they happen to be, they have also chosen to make their cell phone their only means of communication.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028015
    Description:

    Canada has been a connected nation for many years. The penetration of basic telephone service and of cable services have been and remain amongst the highest in the world. The networks most used by Canadians are the wireline telephone network, the cable television network, the wireless telephone network, the Internet, and the satellite and MDS television networks. This article highlights the amazing speed at which connectivity is evolving.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028014
    Description:

    It is difficult to imagine, particularly for younger Canadians, that mobile telecommunications devices were a curiosity only 20 years ago. In fact, mobile communications were not that common as recently as 10 years ago when less than 2 million devices were connected to our wireless networks. While the rate of adoption of the Internet in Canada is one of the highest in the world and the rate of adoption of satellite television is showing signs of a slowdown, there still seems to be considerable potential for growth in the wireless telecommunications industry.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510513142
    Description:

    Call centres are believed to be largely responsible for the phenomenal growth of the business support services industry over the past two decades. The Labour Force Survey is used to profile call-centre workers and to substantiate or disprove some commonly held perceptions.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037431
    Description:

    This article describes the continued resiliency of the radio industry, which has survived television as well as personal stereos such as the Sony Walkman and MP3 players.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016801
    Description:

    Despite stagnating revenues, the telecommunication services industry improved its profits during the first half of 2003 by controlling operating costs and reducing capital spending. The industry recorded $2.6 billion in profits, up a robust 19.4%. A strong financial performance of the wireless sector was achieved in spite of a significant slowdown in the expansion of its customer base. The telecommunication services industry has continued to slash its capital expenditures. In the first six months of 2003, these expenditures amounted to $1.9 billion, down from $2.8 billion for the same period in 2002.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016795
    Description:

    From the early 1950s to the mid-1990s, cable companies were the only businesses offering multi-channel video services, and these services represented much of their revenues. The penetration of cable services grew steadily over the period and peaked in the early 1990s. The introduction of competition from wireless operators has given new life to the industry and its clientele has expanded by more than 20% from 1997 to 2002. Wireless operator companies, which had virtually no customers in 1997, have captured a substantial share of the multi-channel video market. Cable operators have diversified and now play a major role in the Internet access market. Digital technology is gradually displacing analogue technologies.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040016664
    Description:

    Services constitute the single most important industry in Canada's economy, with 68% of total gross domestic product, 75% of employment and 53% of consumer spending. However, this industry is not widely perceived as being Canada's spearhead of research and development (R&D), a role more traditionally assigned to the manufacturing sector. Still, services are becoming an increasingly important force in R&D, which is why we should reconsider the true role played by R&D in the service sector. This article, in fact, sets out to quantify R&D activities within the service sector.

    Highlights of this exploratory study

    - In 2002, the commercial service sector was responsible for 28.5% of all R&D expenditures for the economy as a whole.- In 2000, 36.6% of all personnel assigned full time to R&D worked in the commercial service sector. - Quantification of the amounts spent on R&D from within the service sector does not necessarily correspond to traditional industrial classifications. For example, R&D is primarily performed in such sectors as biotechnology, software, telecommunications, the environment and logistics, which are not included in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) classification scheme.- Several service sector activities are very labour intensive and require highly skilled R&D workers. For example, of all employees performing R&D in the field of biotechnology, 23% hold doctorates or master's degrees.

    Footnote: Commercial services include supply services (transportation, warehousing and trade), communications, finance, real estate, and insurance and business services (information systems, consultation, scientific research, etc.).

    Release date: 2004-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003047
    Description:

    Even though all of the campgrounds and outfitters combined were self-categorized as midscale accommodations, 87% of the campgrounds catered to an economy/midscale market while around 84% of the outfitters were midscale/upscale. Only outfitters derived more revenue from packaged vacations than from guest units. Americans made up the greatest number of those visiting Canada's hunting and fishing camps while campgrounds generated most of their business from Canadian travellers. Canada's pristine wilderness draws foreign travellers who want to experience world-class hunting and fishing expeditions.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003046
    Description:

    Services constitute the single most important industry in Canada's economy, with 68% of total gross domestic product, 75% of employment and 53% of consumer spending. However, this industry is not widely perceived as being Canada's spearhead of research and development (R&D), a role more traditionally assigned to the manufacturing sector. Still, services are becoming an increasingly important force in R&D, and this is why we should reconsider the true role played by R&D in the service sector. This article, in fact, sets out to quantify R&D activities within the service sector.

    Here are some highlights of this exploratory study:

    - In 2002, the commercial service sector was responsible for 28.5% of all R&D expenditures for the economy as a whole.

    - In 2000, 36.6% of all personnel assigned full time to R&D worked in the commercial service sector.

    - Quantification of the amounts spent on R&D from within the service sector does not necessarily correspond to traditional industrial classifications. For example, R&D is primarily performed in such sectors as biotechnology, software, telecommunications, the environment and logistics, which are not included in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) classification scheme.

    - Several service sector activities are very labour intensive and require highly skilled R&D workers. For example, of all employees performing R&D in the field of biotechnology, 23% hold doctorates or master's degrees.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20030036710
    Description:

    The need for Information Technology (IT) support has never been greater than it is today. Businesses, institutions, government and individuals all rely heavily on IT networks to convey information, process data, and provide or access services.

    This paper describes how a leading IT industry, including computer systems design and related services, has responded to the mounting demand for IT services in Canada. Structural differences between small and large system design firms are explored and data describing industry growth rates, export markets, and employment characteristics are examined.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036658
    Description:

    The expansion of the Canadian television broadcasting industry continued in 2002 with the launch of 47 digital channels. This explosion happened at a time when growth in the advertising market was sluggish, leaving broadcasters fighting for available advertising dollars and struggling to maintain profit margins.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036653
    Description:

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are changing the way individuals and organizations access, exchange and use information. The Internet puts a wealth of information and entertainment at its users' fingertips, wireless technologies allow communication and information exchange from almost anywhere at any time, and broadband networks pave the way for applications unheard of only a few years ago. This article looks at some of the fundamental changes that have affected the cable industry in the recent past and examines some of the challenges and opportunities it faces in coming years.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036657
    Description:

    Radio, the oldest electronic medium, is steadily generating profits. Revenues rose 2.7%, reaching over $1.1 billion. The performance of FM stations in recent years is at the root of the sustained level of profits for the radio industry.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003045
    Description:

    The need for Information Technology (IT) support has never been greater than it is today. Businesses, institutions, government and individuals, all rely heavily on IT networks to convey information, process data and provide, or access, services.

    This paper focusses on describing how a leading IT industry, Computer Systems Design and Related Services, has responded to the mounting demand for IT services in Canada. The paper explores structural differences between small and large system design firms and examines data describing industry growth rates, export markets and employment characteristics.

    Release date: 2003-09-02

Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Analysis (92)

Analysis (92) (25 of 92 results)

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2017002
    Description:

    This working paper presents a methodology to measure remoteness at the community level. The method takes into account some of the recent literature on the subject, as well as new computational opportunities provided by the integration of official statistics with data from non-official statistical sources. The approach that was used in the computations accounts for multiple points of access to services; it also establishes a continuum between communities with different transportation infrastructures and connectivity while at the same time retaining the information on the community transportation infrastructures in the database. In addition, a method to implement accessibility measures to selected services is also outlined and a sample of accessibility measures are computed.

    Release date: 2017-05-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-629-X2015021
    Description:

    This short tutorial will show you some basics on how to find business data on the Statistics Canada website, and how to put it to work so you can get the answers you need.

    Release date: 2014-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-629-X2015023
    Description:

    A wealth of local business information at your fingertips!

    Release date: 2013-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008003
    Description:

    Using Statistics Canada's Business Register, this paper investigates the pattern of business establishments in each of the different census metropolitan and census agglomeration influenced zones across rural Canada.

    Release date: 2010-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009083
    Description:

    This article examines trends in the legal and accounting industries, and highlights key characteristics of these industries in relation to the professional sector as a whole and to the Canadian economy. Trends in employment, earnings, output as measured by gross domestic product, capital expenditures, rates of self-employment and of incorporation are investigated. Also socio-economic characteristics of the workforce in legal and accounting services industries are examined.

    Release date: 2009-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110673
    Description:

    Teenagers are not sitting in front of the television all day, but they are keeping busy at other activities! The General Social Survey (GSS) collected time use data in 1986, 1992, 1998 and 2005. Time-use data examines time use over a 24 hour period on a diary day. The analysis in this fact sheet looks at time use by participation rate (number of people reporting an activity) and by the number of minutes spent on an activity. The data show that teenagers aged 15 to 19 were spending less time in front of the television but were spending more time working at a paid job and using the Internet in 2005.

    Release date: 2008-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2008053
    Description:

    With the growth of the service economy, business support services have become more important to the Canadian economy. Changes in business practices such as outsourcing have been made possible by advances in telecommunications technology. Consequently, the business support services industry, which includes credit agencies, telephone call centres, and document preparation and business service centres, has experienced steady growth. Telephone call centres in particular have been identified as potential catalysts for regional development. Research in this area has tended to deal with employment issues (e.g. job creation) or with case studies of firms or communities. Using an industry life cycle approach, this study examines the changing location of telephone call centres.

    Release date: 2008-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060089610
    Description:

    This study examines the frequency with which Canadians follow news and current affairs, the variety of media sources they use and whether this affects their level of civic participation, as measured by involvement in non-voting political activities.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2007052
    Description:

    This paper shows how peoples decisions on whether to own or rent their residences impacted residential landlords and their market. It will also examine how the characteristics of renters have changed since 1986, and offer a brief profile of the residential real estate lessors industry.

    Release date: 2007-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029239
    Description:

    Since the launch of cellular services in the mid-1980s, mobile phones have largely been a complement to the traditional phone line but that is beginning to change. Recent statistics show that more and more of those making plans for the evening have not only chosen to stay connected wherever they happen to be, they have also chosen to make their cell phone their only means of communication.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028015
    Description:

    Canada has been a connected nation for many years. The penetration of basic telephone service and of cable services have been and remain amongst the highest in the world. The networks most used by Canadians are the wireline telephone network, the cable television network, the wireless telephone network, the Internet, and the satellite and MDS television networks. This article highlights the amazing speed at which connectivity is evolving.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028014
    Description:

    It is difficult to imagine, particularly for younger Canadians, that mobile telecommunications devices were a curiosity only 20 years ago. In fact, mobile communications were not that common as recently as 10 years ago when less than 2 million devices were connected to our wireless networks. While the rate of adoption of the Internet in Canada is one of the highest in the world and the rate of adoption of satellite television is showing signs of a slowdown, there still seems to be considerable potential for growth in the wireless telecommunications industry.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510513142
    Description:

    Call centres are believed to be largely responsible for the phenomenal growth of the business support services industry over the past two decades. The Labour Force Survey is used to profile call-centre workers and to substantiate or disprove some commonly held perceptions.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037431
    Description:

    This article describes the continued resiliency of the radio industry, which has survived television as well as personal stereos such as the Sony Walkman and MP3 players.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016801
    Description:

    Despite stagnating revenues, the telecommunication services industry improved its profits during the first half of 2003 by controlling operating costs and reducing capital spending. The industry recorded $2.6 billion in profits, up a robust 19.4%. A strong financial performance of the wireless sector was achieved in spite of a significant slowdown in the expansion of its customer base. The telecommunication services industry has continued to slash its capital expenditures. In the first six months of 2003, these expenditures amounted to $1.9 billion, down from $2.8 billion for the same period in 2002.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016795
    Description:

    From the early 1950s to the mid-1990s, cable companies were the only businesses offering multi-channel video services, and these services represented much of their revenues. The penetration of cable services grew steadily over the period and peaked in the early 1990s. The introduction of competition from wireless operators has given new life to the industry and its clientele has expanded by more than 20% from 1997 to 2002. Wireless operator companies, which had virtually no customers in 1997, have captured a substantial share of the multi-channel video market. Cable operators have diversified and now play a major role in the Internet access market. Digital technology is gradually displacing analogue technologies.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040016664
    Description:

    Services constitute the single most important industry in Canada's economy, with 68% of total gross domestic product, 75% of employment and 53% of consumer spending. However, this industry is not widely perceived as being Canada's spearhead of research and development (R&D), a role more traditionally assigned to the manufacturing sector. Still, services are becoming an increasingly important force in R&D, which is why we should reconsider the true role played by R&D in the service sector. This article, in fact, sets out to quantify R&D activities within the service sector.

    Highlights of this exploratory study

    - In 2002, the commercial service sector was responsible for 28.5% of all R&D expenditures for the economy as a whole.- In 2000, 36.6% of all personnel assigned full time to R&D worked in the commercial service sector. - Quantification of the amounts spent on R&D from within the service sector does not necessarily correspond to traditional industrial classifications. For example, R&D is primarily performed in such sectors as biotechnology, software, telecommunications, the environment and logistics, which are not included in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) classification scheme.- Several service sector activities are very labour intensive and require highly skilled R&D workers. For example, of all employees performing R&D in the field of biotechnology, 23% hold doctorates or master's degrees.

    Footnote: Commercial services include supply services (transportation, warehousing and trade), communications, finance, real estate, and insurance and business services (information systems, consultation, scientific research, etc.).

    Release date: 2004-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003047
    Description:

    Even though all of the campgrounds and outfitters combined were self-categorized as midscale accommodations, 87% of the campgrounds catered to an economy/midscale market while around 84% of the outfitters were midscale/upscale. Only outfitters derived more revenue from packaged vacations than from guest units. Americans made up the greatest number of those visiting Canada's hunting and fishing camps while campgrounds generated most of their business from Canadian travellers. Canada's pristine wilderness draws foreign travellers who want to experience world-class hunting and fishing expeditions.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003046
    Description:

    Services constitute the single most important industry in Canada's economy, with 68% of total gross domestic product, 75% of employment and 53% of consumer spending. However, this industry is not widely perceived as being Canada's spearhead of research and development (R&D), a role more traditionally assigned to the manufacturing sector. Still, services are becoming an increasingly important force in R&D, and this is why we should reconsider the true role played by R&D in the service sector. This article, in fact, sets out to quantify R&D activities within the service sector.

    Here are some highlights of this exploratory study:

    - In 2002, the commercial service sector was responsible for 28.5% of all R&D expenditures for the economy as a whole.

    - In 2000, 36.6% of all personnel assigned full time to R&D worked in the commercial service sector.

    - Quantification of the amounts spent on R&D from within the service sector does not necessarily correspond to traditional industrial classifications. For example, R&D is primarily performed in such sectors as biotechnology, software, telecommunications, the environment and logistics, which are not included in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) classification scheme.

    - Several service sector activities are very labour intensive and require highly skilled R&D workers. For example, of all employees performing R&D in the field of biotechnology, 23% hold doctorates or master's degrees.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20030036710
    Description:

    The need for Information Technology (IT) support has never been greater than it is today. Businesses, institutions, government and individuals all rely heavily on IT networks to convey information, process data, and provide or access services.

    This paper describes how a leading IT industry, including computer systems design and related services, has responded to the mounting demand for IT services in Canada. Structural differences between small and large system design firms are explored and data describing industry growth rates, export markets, and employment characteristics are examined.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036658
    Description:

    The expansion of the Canadian television broadcasting industry continued in 2002 with the launch of 47 digital channels. This explosion happened at a time when growth in the advertising market was sluggish, leaving broadcasters fighting for available advertising dollars and struggling to maintain profit margins.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036653
    Description:

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are changing the way individuals and organizations access, exchange and use information. The Internet puts a wealth of information and entertainment at its users' fingertips, wireless technologies allow communication and information exchange from almost anywhere at any time, and broadband networks pave the way for applications unheard of only a few years ago. This article looks at some of the fundamental changes that have affected the cable industry in the recent past and examines some of the challenges and opportunities it faces in coming years.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036657
    Description:

    Radio, the oldest electronic medium, is steadily generating profits. Revenues rose 2.7%, reaching over $1.1 billion. The performance of FM stations in recent years is at the root of the sustained level of profits for the radio industry.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003045
    Description:

    The need for Information Technology (IT) support has never been greater than it is today. Businesses, institutions, government and individuals, all rely heavily on IT networks to convey information, process data and provide, or access, services.

    This paper focusses on describing how a leading IT industry, Computer Systems Design and Related Services, has responded to the mounting demand for IT services in Canada. The paper explores structural differences between small and large system design firms and examines data describing industry growth rates, export markets and employment characteristics.

    Release date: 2003-09-02

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: