Statistics by subject – Business, consumer and property services

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  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037431
    Description:

    This article describes the continued resiliency of the radio industry, which has survived television as well as personal stereos such as the Sony Walkman and MP3 players.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Table: 56-001-X20040047805
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for the cable, direct-to-home satellite and wireless cable television industries for the 2000 to 2003 period.

    Release date: 2004-09-14

  • Table: 56-001-X20040037806
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for the private radio industry for the 2000 to 2003 period.

    Release date: 2004-07-05

  • Table: 56-001-X20040027807
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for the television broadcasting industry for the 2000 to 2003 period.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Table: 56-001-X20040017809
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for wireline and wireless telecommunication services industries for the 1999 to 2002 period.

    Release date: 2004-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016795
    Description:

    From the early 1950s to the mid-1990s, cable companies were the only businesses offering multi-channel video services, and these services represented much of their revenues. The penetration of cable services grew steadily over the period and peaked in the early 1990s. The introduction of competition from wireless operators has given new life to the industry and its clientele has expanded by more than 20% from 1997 to 2002. Wireless operator companies, which had virtually no customers in 1997, have captured a substantial share of the multi-channel video market. Cable operators have diversified and now play a major role in the Internet access market. Digital technology is gradually displacing analogue technologies.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016801
    Description:

    Despite stagnating revenues, the telecommunication services industry improved its profits during the first half of 2003 by controlling operating costs and reducing capital spending. The industry recorded $2.6 billion in profits, up a robust 19.4%. A strong financial performance of the wireless sector was achieved in spite of a significant slowdown in the expansion of its customer base. The telecommunication services industry has continued to slash its capital expenditures. In the first six months of 2003, these expenditures amounted to $1.9 billion, down from $2.8 billion for the same period in 2002.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040016664
    Description:

    Services constitute the single most important industry in Canada's economy, with 68% of total gross domestic product, 75% of employment and 53% of consumer spending. However, this industry is not widely perceived as being Canada's spearhead of research and development (R&D), a role more traditionally assigned to the manufacturing sector. Still, services are becoming an increasingly important force in R&D, which is why we should reconsider the true role played by R&D in the service sector. This article, in fact, sets out to quantify R&D activities within the service sector.

    Highlights of this exploratory study

    - In 2002, the commercial service sector was responsible for 28.5% of all R&D expenditures for the economy as a whole.- In 2000, 36.6% of all personnel assigned full time to R&D worked in the commercial service sector. - Quantification of the amounts spent on R&D from within the service sector does not necessarily correspond to traditional industrial classifications. For example, R&D is primarily performed in such sectors as biotechnology, software, telecommunications, the environment and logistics, which are not included in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) classification scheme.- Several service sector activities are very labour intensive and require highly skilled R&D workers. For example, of all employees performing R&D in the field of biotechnology, 23% hold doctorates or master's degrees.

    Footnote: Commercial services include supply services (transportation, warehousing and trade), communications, finance, real estate, and insurance and business services (information systems, consultation, scientific research, etc.).

    Release date: 2004-01-22

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  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037431
    Description:

    This article describes the continued resiliency of the radio industry, which has survived television as well as personal stereos such as the Sony Walkman and MP3 players.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016795
    Description:

    From the early 1950s to the mid-1990s, cable companies were the only businesses offering multi-channel video services, and these services represented much of their revenues. The penetration of cable services grew steadily over the period and peaked in the early 1990s. The introduction of competition from wireless operators has given new life to the industry and its clientele has expanded by more than 20% from 1997 to 2002. Wireless operator companies, which had virtually no customers in 1997, have captured a substantial share of the multi-channel video market. Cable operators have diversified and now play a major role in the Internet access market. Digital technology is gradually displacing analogue technologies.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016801
    Description:

    Despite stagnating revenues, the telecommunication services industry improved its profits during the first half of 2003 by controlling operating costs and reducing capital spending. The industry recorded $2.6 billion in profits, up a robust 19.4%. A strong financial performance of the wireless sector was achieved in spite of a significant slowdown in the expansion of its customer base. The telecommunication services industry has continued to slash its capital expenditures. In the first six months of 2003, these expenditures amounted to $1.9 billion, down from $2.8 billion for the same period in 2002.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040016664
    Description:

    Services constitute the single most important industry in Canada's economy, with 68% of total gross domestic product, 75% of employment and 53% of consumer spending. However, this industry is not widely perceived as being Canada's spearhead of research and development (R&D), a role more traditionally assigned to the manufacturing sector. Still, services are becoming an increasingly important force in R&D, which is why we should reconsider the true role played by R&D in the service sector. This article, in fact, sets out to quantify R&D activities within the service sector.

    Highlights of this exploratory study

    - In 2002, the commercial service sector was responsible for 28.5% of all R&D expenditures for the economy as a whole.- In 2000, 36.6% of all personnel assigned full time to R&D worked in the commercial service sector. - Quantification of the amounts spent on R&D from within the service sector does not necessarily correspond to traditional industrial classifications. For example, R&D is primarily performed in such sectors as biotechnology, software, telecommunications, the environment and logistics, which are not included in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) classification scheme.- Several service sector activities are very labour intensive and require highly skilled R&D workers. For example, of all employees performing R&D in the field of biotechnology, 23% hold doctorates or master's degrees.

    Footnote: Commercial services include supply services (transportation, warehousing and trade), communications, finance, real estate, and insurance and business services (information systems, consultation, scientific research, etc.).

    Release date: 2004-01-22

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