Statistics by subject – Small and medium-sized businesses

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (99)

All (99) (25 of 99 results)

Data (29)

Data (29) (25 of 29 results)

Analysis (61)

Analysis (61) (25 of 61 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017069
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series describes the extent to which immigrant-owned businesses are in the ‘knowledge-based’ economy, in the more traditional ethnic economy, or in other industrial sectors. It further outlines the differences among immigrant classes (family, refugee, business and economic classes) in the types of businesses owned. The analysis focuses on two types of businesses: privately-owned incorporated companies and the unincorporated self-employed.

    Release date: 2017-03-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-03-14

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-11-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-11-27

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-10-08

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014091
    Description:

    This paper uses data from Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program database to study the distribution of annual employment growth rates in Canada over the 2000-to-2009 period, with a special emphasis on firms in the tails of the distribution, referred to here as High-Growth Firms (HGFs) and Rapidly Shrinking Firms (RSFs).

    The study has three objectives. First, it describes the distributions of employment growth rates in Canada to see whether they are consistent with observations in other countries. Second, it quantifies the contribution of HGFs and RSFs to aggregate job creation and destruction. The third objective is to examine, using quantile regression techniques, the role of firm size and firm age in the performance of HGFs and RSFs.

    Release date: 2014-05-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-02-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013087
    Description:

    The topic of firm size and performance continues to spark the interest of researchers and policy-makers. Small and medium-sized enterprises receive much of the attention, as they have the potential to grow significantly. However, compared with their larger counterparts, these firms are more likely to fail and are therefore riskier.

    Is risk important in explaining differences in profitability across firm size classes? This study uses a longitudinal firm-level dataset to examine determinants of profitability by firm size, with an emphasis on risk, or the volatility in rates of return. It builds on previous research that found firms with 10 to 20 employees tend to be the most profitable.

    Release date: 2013-12-19

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-08-26

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-04-08

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012021
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on the size distribution of Canadian firms compiled for the research paper Small, Medium-sized, and Large Businesses in the Canadian Economy: Measuring Their Contribution to Gross Domestic Product from 2001 to 2008. The creation of estimates of gross domestic product by firm size is part of a program at Statistics Canada that examines the structure of the Canadian economy and its evolution.

    Release date: 2012-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012082
    Description:

    This paper adds to our understanding of the contributions made to the economy by small, medium-sized, and large businesses in Canada. It does this by examining the shares of gross domestic product (GDP) produced by each of these size groups in the business sector.

    Previous studies relied predominately on employment, an input to the production process, rather than on a measure of output. This study overcomes this problem by focusing directly on GDP.

    Release date: 2012-12-07

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012012
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series looks at the relationship between firm size and financial performance. It highlights the results from the research paper Firm Dynamics: Variation in Profitability Across Canadian Firms of Different Sizes, 2000 to 2009. The research paper uses a special longitudinal database that follows corporate entities between 2000 and 2009. It is part of a set of research projects being carried out at Statistics Canada on the topic of business dynamics.

    Release date: 2012-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012026
    Description:

    Are small firms more profitable than large firms? This paper uses a longitudinal firm-level dataset to explore the financial performance of firms across size classes, and across industries and provinces during the 2000-to-2009 period. It also examines the volatility of profitability across firm size classes.

    Release date: 2012-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2012001
    Description:

    In rural and small town areas, self-employed individuals generally operate small(er) enterprises. Most are unincorporated but some are incorporated. These small(er) self-employment enterprises typically provide important services in rural and small town areas. Examples range from general stores to hair styling salons to plumbing and electrician enterprises to dentists.This bulletin analyzes the relative importance of each of these self-employment businesses in rural and small town Canada. It examines the age structure of self-employed workers to determine whether there is an impending surge of retirements among the rural self-employed.

    Release date: 2012-07-12

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012011
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series looks at the relationship between firm size and employment growth rates. It is based on the working paper Firm Dynamics: Employment Growth Rates of Small Versus Large Firms in Canada, which is the result of a joint research effort by Statistics Canada and Industry Canada.

    Release date: 2012-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012025
    Description:

    This paper examines whether Canadian firms of different sizes (in terms of employment) grow at different rates year-on-year. The data are from Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program and cover the 1999-to-2008 period. The methodology is similar to that used by Haltiwanger, Jarmin and Miranda (2010) for the United States: controls are used for firm age, and possible bias from short-term regression to the mean is removed by sizing firms according to their average number of employees in both previous and current years.

    Release date: 2012-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012009
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series decomposes business-sector annual net employment growth into gross employment creation and gross employment destruction at the firm level. It is based on research carried out by Statistics Canada on the topic of business dynamics.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012024
    Description:

    This paper looks at annual changes in Canadian business sector employment from 2001 to 2009. This period encompasses an expansionary phase (2001 to 2008), followed by a recession (2008/2009). Firm-level data are used to decompose yearly net employment change into gross employment creation and destruction, which makes it possible to measure the size of total annual employment reallocation. These measures of employment turnover are compared across industries and firm size classes.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011071
    Description:

    This paper asks how the performance of self-employed unincorporated businesses affects the size of the gap in labour productivity between Canada and the United States. To do so, the business sector in each country is divided into unincorporated and corporate businesses, and estimates of labour productivity are generated for each sector.

    The productivity performance of the unincorporated sector relative to the corporate sector is much lower in Canada than in the United States. As a result, when the unincorporated sector is removed from the estimates for the business sector in each country and only the corporate sectors for the two countries are compared, the gap in the level of productivity between Canada and the United States is reduced.

    The unincorporated sector consists of both sole proprietorships and partnerships. This paper also investigates the impact of just sole proprietorships on the Canada-United States productivity gap. Sole proprietorships in the two countries more closely resemble one another than do partnerships, as U.S. partnerships are much larger than their Canadian counterparts.

    When sole proprietorships are removed from the business-sector estimates of each country (allowing a comparison of sole proprietorships to the rest of the business sector, which consists of partnerships and the corporate sector), the gap in labour productivity between Canada and the United States also declines but by only about half as much as when both sole proprietorships and partnerships are removed.

    The lower productivity of the unincorporated sector (both sole proprietorships and partnerships) accounted for almost the entire productivity gap between Canada and the United States in 1998. Since then, the productivity of the corporate sector in Canada has fallen relative to that of the corporate sector in the United States and the unincorporated sector no longer accounts for the entire gap.

    Release date: 2011-07-28

Reference (9)

Reference (9) (9 of 9 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5028
    Release date: 2017-03-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 6000
    Release date: 2016-09-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2941
    Release date: 2015-08-04

  • Index and guides: 11-017-X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's Newsletter for Small and Medium-sized Businesses offers information to the business community about Statistics Canada's data and services. The newsletter also offers links to data releases of the Census and National Household Survey, videos, tutorials, media advisories, learning sessions and presentations.

    Release date: 2014-11-20

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2014033
    Description:

    This paper examines and compares labour productivity in Canada and the United States for small and large firms over the period from 2002 to 2008. It quantifies the relative importance of small and large firms in Canada and the United States and measures the relative productivity levels of small versus large firms.

    Small firms are relatively more important in the Canadian economy. Small firms are less productive than large firms in both countries. But the productivity disadvantage of small relative to large firms was higher in Canada.

    The paper provides an estimate of the impact that these differences have on the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States. It first estimates the changes that would occur in Canadian aggregate labour productivity if the share of hours worked of large firms in Canada was increased to the U.S. level. It then quantifies the impact of increasing the relative productivity of small to large firms in Canada up to the relative productivity ratio of small firms to large firms that existed in the United States.

    Together, decreasing the relative importance of small firms in the economy and increasing their relative productivity compared to large firms accounts for most of the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States in 2002. However, changes in the economy that occurred between 2002 and 2008 reduced the contribution of the small-firm sector to the gap in productivity levels.

    Release date: 2014-01-08

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2013032
    Description:

    This paper examines differences in labour productivity across small, medium- and large-sized enterprises in Canada.

    In 2008, the level of labour productivity, as measured by nominal gross domestic product per hour worked, in large businesses was greater than that for medium-sized and small businesses. This gap between large businesses relative to small and medium-sized businesses narrowed slightly during the post-2000 period. The paper also examines the impact of changes in industrial structure on labour productivity.

    Release date: 2013-08-26

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2006010
    Description:

    It is well-known that small firms are managed differently from large firms, and this paper provides further evidence in support of this idea while suggesting that some small firms are adopting management behaviours of larger firms. Could these small firms be positioning themselves for growth or using organisational innovation as a tool for survival or adopting some formal organization practices early? In 2004, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology provided a list of eight management practices that according to interviews with small and medium-sized firms indicated potential firm growth. The management practices listed were organisational structures; employee feedback surveys; mentoring or coaching programs; and written strategies for marketing; managing growth; commercialisation of intellectual property; succession management; and risk management.

    Release date: 2006-10-02

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004022
    Description:

    This working paper examines whether the innovative characteristics of small manufacturing firms that show high growth are significantly different from those of other types of small manufacturing firms. Two groups of small firms are analysed: those with 20 to 49 employees and those with 50 to 99 employees in 1997.

    The data analysed in this paper are from the Survey of Innovation 1999, which surveyed manufacturing provincial enterprises with at least 20 employees and at least $250,000 in revenues. Data from the Survey of Innovation 1999 has been linked to the Annual Survey of Manufactures for 1997 and 1999, and the growth of firms was determined based on this data. Eight different indicators of the innovative characteristics of small firms are presented.

    Release date: 2004-12-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004021
    Description:

    This working paper outlines the critical growth factors resulting from interviews with senior business managers. It also explores additional sources of data and makes recommendations for the content of possible future surveys.

    Release date: 2004-12-10

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: