Statistics by subject – Business performance and ownership

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All (15)

All (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2014033
    Description:

    This paper examines and compares labour productivity in Canada and the United States for small and large firms over the period from 2002 to 2008. It quantifies the relative importance of small and large firms in Canada and the United States and measures the relative productivity levels of small versus large firms.

    Small firms are relatively more important in the Canadian economy. Small firms are less productive than large firms in both countries. But the productivity disadvantage of small relative to large firms was higher in Canada.

    The paper provides an estimate of the impact that these differences have on the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States. It first estimates the changes that would occur in Canadian aggregate labour productivity if the share of hours worked of large firms in Canada was increased to the U.S. level. It then quantifies the impact of increasing the relative productivity of small to large firms in Canada up to the relative productivity ratio of small firms to large firms that existed in the United States.

    Together, decreasing the relative importance of small firms in the economy and increasing their relative productivity compared to large firms accounts for most of the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States in 2002. However, changes in the economy that occurred between 2002 and 2008 reduced the contribution of the small-firm sector to the gap in productivity levels.

    Release date: 2014-01-08

  • Technical products: 63-250-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the travel arrangement services industry. It provides users with information required for making corporate decisions, monitoring programs and reviewing policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2013-12-11

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2013032
    Description:

    This paper examines differences in labour productivity across small, medium- and large-sized enterprises in Canada.

    In 2008, the level of labour productivity, as measured by nominal gross domestic product per hour worked, in large businesses was greater than that for medium-sized and small businesses. This gap between large businesses relative to small and medium-sized businesses narrowed slightly during the post-2000 period. The paper also examines the impact of changes in industrial structure on labour productivity.

    Release date: 2013-08-26

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2013030
    Description:

    This paper provides a provincial perspective on the slowdown in productivity and economic growth in the total business sector in Canada between 2000 and 2010 compared to the late 1990s. It uses the most recent provincial multifactor productivity database.

    Release date: 2013-04-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2008002
    Description:

    This paper is based on the findings of the Survey of Technology and Electronic Commerce (SECT), which in 2005 included a module on business incubation service providers and users. The results of the Survey of Business Incubators (SBI) were discussed in Joseph, Bordt and Hamdani (2006). The main difference between the two surveys is that the SBI focused on business incubators (BIs), firms that provided business incubation as their main line of activity the criterion used to define industry boundaries in statistical systems whereas the SECT covered all firms that provided business incubation services to new companies, whether it was their main activity or a small part of the business.

    Release date: 2008-03-27

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2008017
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of the productivity program at Statistics Canada and a brief description of Canada's productivity performance. The paper defines productivity and the various measures that are used to investigate different aspects of productivity growth. It describes the difference between partial productivity measures (such as labour productivity) and a more complete measure (multifactor productivity) and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The paper explains why productivity is important. It outlines how productivity growth fits into the growth accounting framework and how this framework is used to examine the various sources of economic growth. The paper briefly discusses the challenges that face statisticians in measuring productivity growth. It also provides an overview of Canada's long-term productivity performance and compares Canada to the United States - both in terms of productivity levels and productivity growth rates.

    Release date: 2008-02-25

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2006010
    Description:

    It is well-known that small firms are managed differently from large firms, and this paper provides further evidence in support of this idea while suggesting that some small firms are adopting management behaviours of larger firms. Could these small firms be positioning themselves for growth or using organisational innovation as a tool for survival or adopting some formal organization practices early? In 2004, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology provided a list of eight management practices that according to interviews with small and medium-sized firms indicated potential firm growth. The management practices listed were organisational structures; employee feedback surveys; mentoring or coaching programs; and written strategies for marketing; managing growth; commercialisation of intellectual property; succession management; and risk management.

    Release date: 2006-10-02

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2006003
    Description:

    The objective of this study was to continue the investigation into growth factors initiated by the previous project: The characteristics of firms that grow from small to medium size in collaboration with the National Research Council Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP). Twenty five interviews augmented the original 25 with a more heterogeneous mix of Canadian technology-based firms led to the development of a framework for assessing the technology phase of small companies (or business lines in larger companies).

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Technical products: 11F0024M
    Description:

    This product contains presentations done at Statistics Canada's annual Economic Conference which provides a forum for the exchange of empirical research among the business, government, research and labour communities. The conference is also a means to promote economic and socio-economic analysis while subjecting existing data to critical assessment as part of an ongoing process of statistical development and review.

    Release date: 2005-10-20

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005004
    Description:

    Knowledge management practices were more important to the success of innovative business units in selected service industries than was the case for non-innovative business units. Innovative business units were those that introduced new or significantly improved products or processes between 2001 and 2003. The knowledge management practices that were important to their success included knowledge sharing, knowledge codification, knowledge development and knowledge acquisition and retention practices.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004022
    Description:

    This working paper examines whether the innovative characteristics of small manufacturing firms that show high growth are significantly different from those of other types of small manufacturing firms. Two groups of small firms are analysed: those with 20 to 49 employees and those with 50 to 99 employees in 1997.

    The data analysed in this paper are from the Survey of Innovation 1999, which surveyed manufacturing provincial enterprises with at least 20 employees and at least $250,000 in revenues. Data from the Survey of Innovation 1999 has been linked to the Annual Survey of Manufactures for 1997 and 1999, and the growth of firms was determined based on this data. Eight different indicators of the innovative characteristics of small firms are presented.

    Release date: 2004-12-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004021
    Description:

    This working paper outlines the critical growth factors resulting from interviews with senior business managers. It also explores additional sources of data and makes recommendations for the content of possible future surveys.

    Release date: 2004-12-10

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003002
    Description:

    Today, businesses and individuals are more frequently using electronic networks to obtain information; but are they also using these networks to share information or to create business solutions? Individuals can turn to the Internet to check out companies that post annual reports, catalogues and job opportunities. Businesses can post their catalogues, ask for and reply to tenders, offer training, communicate with customers and suppliers, and post job opportunities over electronic networks. Finally, public sector administrations have entered heavily into electronic information sharing under such initiatives as Government On-Line.

    The Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology captured how, in 2001, businesses used the Internet, intranets, extranets or electronic data interchanges (EDIs) to make information available within their organizations, to their suppliers or customers, or accessible to other organizations. Businesses were asked the types of information, or interactive or network-based activities they made available via electronic networks. Information included product descriptions or catalogues, order status, demand projections, inventory data, customer information and job opportunities. The one interactive or network-based activity captured was electronic training. The information flows captured by this question provide a better understanding of how e-business, in particular electronic customer and supplier relationships, is operating in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-03-03

  • Technical products: 21-601-M1998037
    Description:

    This paper looks at the number of business establishment starts in smaller and larger communities in Canada from 1993 to 1996.

    Release date: 2000-01-18

  • Technical products: 61F0041M
    Description:

    These papers consist of research related to business and trade statistics.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

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Reference (15)

Reference (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2014033
    Description:

    This paper examines and compares labour productivity in Canada and the United States for small and large firms over the period from 2002 to 2008. It quantifies the relative importance of small and large firms in Canada and the United States and measures the relative productivity levels of small versus large firms.

    Small firms are relatively more important in the Canadian economy. Small firms are less productive than large firms in both countries. But the productivity disadvantage of small relative to large firms was higher in Canada.

    The paper provides an estimate of the impact that these differences have on the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States. It first estimates the changes that would occur in Canadian aggregate labour productivity if the share of hours worked of large firms in Canada was increased to the U.S. level. It then quantifies the impact of increasing the relative productivity of small to large firms in Canada up to the relative productivity ratio of small firms to large firms that existed in the United States.

    Together, decreasing the relative importance of small firms in the economy and increasing their relative productivity compared to large firms accounts for most of the gap in productivity levels between Canada and the United States in 2002. However, changes in the economy that occurred between 2002 and 2008 reduced the contribution of the small-firm sector to the gap in productivity levels.

    Release date: 2014-01-08

  • Technical products: 63-250-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of trends in the travel arrangement services industry. It provides users with information required for making corporate decisions, monitoring programs and reviewing policies. The tables focus on financial and operating data.

    Release date: 2013-12-11

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2013032
    Description:

    This paper examines differences in labour productivity across small, medium- and large-sized enterprises in Canada.

    In 2008, the level of labour productivity, as measured by nominal gross domestic product per hour worked, in large businesses was greater than that for medium-sized and small businesses. This gap between large businesses relative to small and medium-sized businesses narrowed slightly during the post-2000 period. The paper also examines the impact of changes in industrial structure on labour productivity.

    Release date: 2013-08-26

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2013030
    Description:

    This paper provides a provincial perspective on the slowdown in productivity and economic growth in the total business sector in Canada between 2000 and 2010 compared to the late 1990s. It uses the most recent provincial multifactor productivity database.

    Release date: 2013-04-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2008002
    Description:

    This paper is based on the findings of the Survey of Technology and Electronic Commerce (SECT), which in 2005 included a module on business incubation service providers and users. The results of the Survey of Business Incubators (SBI) were discussed in Joseph, Bordt and Hamdani (2006). The main difference between the two surveys is that the SBI focused on business incubators (BIs), firms that provided business incubation as their main line of activity the criterion used to define industry boundaries in statistical systems whereas the SECT covered all firms that provided business incubation services to new companies, whether it was their main activity or a small part of the business.

    Release date: 2008-03-27

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2008017
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of the productivity program at Statistics Canada and a brief description of Canada's productivity performance. The paper defines productivity and the various measures that are used to investigate different aspects of productivity growth. It describes the difference between partial productivity measures (such as labour productivity) and a more complete measure (multifactor productivity) and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The paper explains why productivity is important. It outlines how productivity growth fits into the growth accounting framework and how this framework is used to examine the various sources of economic growth. The paper briefly discusses the challenges that face statisticians in measuring productivity growth. It also provides an overview of Canada's long-term productivity performance and compares Canada to the United States - both in terms of productivity levels and productivity growth rates.

    Release date: 2008-02-25

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2006010
    Description:

    It is well-known that small firms are managed differently from large firms, and this paper provides further evidence in support of this idea while suggesting that some small firms are adopting management behaviours of larger firms. Could these small firms be positioning themselves for growth or using organisational innovation as a tool for survival or adopting some formal organization practices early? In 2004, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology provided a list of eight management practices that according to interviews with small and medium-sized firms indicated potential firm growth. The management practices listed were organisational structures; employee feedback surveys; mentoring or coaching programs; and written strategies for marketing; managing growth; commercialisation of intellectual property; succession management; and risk management.

    Release date: 2006-10-02

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2006003
    Description:

    The objective of this study was to continue the investigation into growth factors initiated by the previous project: The characteristics of firms that grow from small to medium size in collaboration with the National Research Council Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP). Twenty five interviews augmented the original 25 with a more heterogeneous mix of Canadian technology-based firms led to the development of a framework for assessing the technology phase of small companies (or business lines in larger companies).

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Technical products: 11F0024M
    Description:

    This product contains presentations done at Statistics Canada's annual Economic Conference which provides a forum for the exchange of empirical research among the business, government, research and labour communities. The conference is also a means to promote economic and socio-economic analysis while subjecting existing data to critical assessment as part of an ongoing process of statistical development and review.

    Release date: 2005-10-20

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005004
    Description:

    Knowledge management practices were more important to the success of innovative business units in selected service industries than was the case for non-innovative business units. Innovative business units were those that introduced new or significantly improved products or processes between 2001 and 2003. The knowledge management practices that were important to their success included knowledge sharing, knowledge codification, knowledge development and knowledge acquisition and retention practices.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004022
    Description:

    This working paper examines whether the innovative characteristics of small manufacturing firms that show high growth are significantly different from those of other types of small manufacturing firms. Two groups of small firms are analysed: those with 20 to 49 employees and those with 50 to 99 employees in 1997.

    The data analysed in this paper are from the Survey of Innovation 1999, which surveyed manufacturing provincial enterprises with at least 20 employees and at least $250,000 in revenues. Data from the Survey of Innovation 1999 has been linked to the Annual Survey of Manufactures for 1997 and 1999, and the growth of firms was determined based on this data. Eight different indicators of the innovative characteristics of small firms are presented.

    Release date: 2004-12-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004021
    Description:

    This working paper outlines the critical growth factors resulting from interviews with senior business managers. It also explores additional sources of data and makes recommendations for the content of possible future surveys.

    Release date: 2004-12-10

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003002
    Description:

    Today, businesses and individuals are more frequently using electronic networks to obtain information; but are they also using these networks to share information or to create business solutions? Individuals can turn to the Internet to check out companies that post annual reports, catalogues and job opportunities. Businesses can post their catalogues, ask for and reply to tenders, offer training, communicate with customers and suppliers, and post job opportunities over electronic networks. Finally, public sector administrations have entered heavily into electronic information sharing under such initiatives as Government On-Line.

    The Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology captured how, in 2001, businesses used the Internet, intranets, extranets or electronic data interchanges (EDIs) to make information available within their organizations, to their suppliers or customers, or accessible to other organizations. Businesses were asked the types of information, or interactive or network-based activities they made available via electronic networks. Information included product descriptions or catalogues, order status, demand projections, inventory data, customer information and job opportunities. The one interactive or network-based activity captured was electronic training. The information flows captured by this question provide a better understanding of how e-business, in particular electronic customer and supplier relationships, is operating in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-03-03

  • Technical products: 21-601-M1998037
    Description:

    This paper looks at the number of business establishment starts in smaller and larger communities in Canada from 1993 to 1996.

    Release date: 2000-01-18

  • Technical products: 61F0041M
    Description:

    These papers consist of research related to business and trade statistics.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

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