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All (7)

All (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M1995034
    Description:

    One of the most significant financial market trends is the increased use of derivative instruments. Across the entire investment spectrum, from private investors to major banks and large institutional fund managers, the use of derivative products is becoming encompassing. Derivatives can be broadly defined as secondary assets, the value of which changes in concert with price movements of a related or underlying primary asset. These instruments may be divided into four broad categories: futures, forwards, options and swaps. Trading on established exchanges, and very active in over-the-counter markets, derivative contracts have become fundamental tools in both domestic and international finance.

    Release date: 1995-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995075
    Description:

    This study examines technology use in Canada's manufacturing sector, and how a set of technology-using manufacturing establishments performed relative to non-users. Data originates from a recent Statistics Canada survey, asking manufacturing firms about their use of 22 advanced manufacturing technologies, and panel data taken from the Census of Manufacturers.

    Results show that the use of advanced manufacturing technology is widespread, especially in large firms, that multiple-technology use is the norm, and that technologies are generally combined within, as opposed to across, production stages. The technology revolution has been felt more in the area of inspection and communications, and less in fabrication and assembly. In terms of performance, technology-using establishments pay higher wages, enjoy higher labour productivity, and are gaining market share at the expense of non-users.

    Release date: 1995-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995078
    Description:

    This paper investigates the dynamics of job reallocation in the manufacturing sector of Canada. It does so by examining the pattern and magnitude of job gain, job loss, and total job turnover due to growth and decline of some firms, and entry and exit of other firms. It also investigates how the effect of cyclical as opposed to structural influences on job turnover have changed over time. Finally, the paper investigates whether the pattern and magnitude of job turnover differ across industries and across regions, and whether the differences are either caused by differences in cyclical sensitivity of job creation and job destruction or in the extent to which restructuring is taking place.

    Release date: 1995-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994072
    Description:

    This paper examines the maturation process of firms that enter an industry by constructing new plant and investigates the extent to which improvements in the performance of an entry cohort are the result of a selection process that culls out the most inefficient entrants or of a learning process that allows survivors to improve their performance relative to incumbent firms. Both selection and evolutionary learning are related to post-entry performance. Despite the difference in the effect of selection and learning on the amount of post-entry growth, selection per se is a more important contributor to overall growth of a cohort.

    Release date: 1995-04-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995074
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of small and medium-sized firms that perform training. It uses data taken from a recent Statistics Canada survey that permit firms' training decisions to be analyzed within the broader context of their many activities and strategies.

    The study finds strong evidence for the hypothesis that human capital development facilitated by training is complementary to innovation and technological change. Training incidence is found to be closely related to the importance that a firm gives to research and development, the use of new technologies, and numerous other strategies that are related to innovation. Training is also greater where a firm emphasizes quality and a comprehensive human-resource strategy. The results point to the inherent complementarity of technology and human resources policy.

    Release date: 1995-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995073
    Description:

    This study investigates differences in the policies being pursued by innovative and non-innovative firms. It focuses on a broad group of strategies -- in marketing, finance, production, management and human resources and asks whether there are key areas in which the strategies being followed by innovative and non-innovative firms differ. It also asks how the activities of firms in each of these areas differs. Finally, it compares the performance of innovative and non-innovative firms. The study finds that innovative firms place a greater emphasis on management, human resources, marketing, financing, government programs and services, and production efficiencies. In most of these areas, innovative firms pursue activities more intensively. Finally, innovative firms are more successful than non-innovative firms.

    Release date: 1995-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995076
    Description:

    This study examines the differences in strategies and activities pursued by a sample of more-successful and less-successful group of growing small- and medium-sized enterprises. Amongst other matters, it examines different functional strategies -- the importance of management, human resource practices, marketing, financing, and the innovativeness of the firm. Innovative activities are the most important determinants of success; that is, for a wide range of industries, they serve to discriminate between the more- and the less-successful firms better than any other variable. Almost all of the strategy questions that relate to innovative activity receive higher scores from the more-successful group of firms than from the less-successful group of firms. This is also the case for innovative activities -- whether a firm possesses an R&D unit, its expenditure on R&D relative to total investment, and its R&D-to-sales ratio.

    Release date: 1995-02-28

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Analysis (7)

Analysis (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M1995034
    Description:

    One of the most significant financial market trends is the increased use of derivative instruments. Across the entire investment spectrum, from private investors to major banks and large institutional fund managers, the use of derivative products is becoming encompassing. Derivatives can be broadly defined as secondary assets, the value of which changes in concert with price movements of a related or underlying primary asset. These instruments may be divided into four broad categories: futures, forwards, options and swaps. Trading on established exchanges, and very active in over-the-counter markets, derivative contracts have become fundamental tools in both domestic and international finance.

    Release date: 1995-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995075
    Description:

    This study examines technology use in Canada's manufacturing sector, and how a set of technology-using manufacturing establishments performed relative to non-users. Data originates from a recent Statistics Canada survey, asking manufacturing firms about their use of 22 advanced manufacturing technologies, and panel data taken from the Census of Manufacturers.

    Results show that the use of advanced manufacturing technology is widespread, especially in large firms, that multiple-technology use is the norm, and that technologies are generally combined within, as opposed to across, production stages. The technology revolution has been felt more in the area of inspection and communications, and less in fabrication and assembly. In terms of performance, technology-using establishments pay higher wages, enjoy higher labour productivity, and are gaining market share at the expense of non-users.

    Release date: 1995-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995078
    Description:

    This paper investigates the dynamics of job reallocation in the manufacturing sector of Canada. It does so by examining the pattern and magnitude of job gain, job loss, and total job turnover due to growth and decline of some firms, and entry and exit of other firms. It also investigates how the effect of cyclical as opposed to structural influences on job turnover have changed over time. Finally, the paper investigates whether the pattern and magnitude of job turnover differ across industries and across regions, and whether the differences are either caused by differences in cyclical sensitivity of job creation and job destruction or in the extent to which restructuring is taking place.

    Release date: 1995-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994072
    Description:

    This paper examines the maturation process of firms that enter an industry by constructing new plant and investigates the extent to which improvements in the performance of an entry cohort are the result of a selection process that culls out the most inefficient entrants or of a learning process that allows survivors to improve their performance relative to incumbent firms. Both selection and evolutionary learning are related to post-entry performance. Despite the difference in the effect of selection and learning on the amount of post-entry growth, selection per se is a more important contributor to overall growth of a cohort.

    Release date: 1995-04-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995074
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of small and medium-sized firms that perform training. It uses data taken from a recent Statistics Canada survey that permit firms' training decisions to be analyzed within the broader context of their many activities and strategies.

    The study finds strong evidence for the hypothesis that human capital development facilitated by training is complementary to innovation and technological change. Training incidence is found to be closely related to the importance that a firm gives to research and development, the use of new technologies, and numerous other strategies that are related to innovation. Training is also greater where a firm emphasizes quality and a comprehensive human-resource strategy. The results point to the inherent complementarity of technology and human resources policy.

    Release date: 1995-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995073
    Description:

    This study investigates differences in the policies being pursued by innovative and non-innovative firms. It focuses on a broad group of strategies -- in marketing, finance, production, management and human resources and asks whether there are key areas in which the strategies being followed by innovative and non-innovative firms differ. It also asks how the activities of firms in each of these areas differs. Finally, it compares the performance of innovative and non-innovative firms. The study finds that innovative firms place a greater emphasis on management, human resources, marketing, financing, government programs and services, and production efficiencies. In most of these areas, innovative firms pursue activities more intensively. Finally, innovative firms are more successful than non-innovative firms.

    Release date: 1995-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995076
    Description:

    This study examines the differences in strategies and activities pursued by a sample of more-successful and less-successful group of growing small- and medium-sized enterprises. Amongst other matters, it examines different functional strategies -- the importance of management, human resource practices, marketing, financing, and the innovativeness of the firm. Innovative activities are the most important determinants of success; that is, for a wide range of industries, they serve to discriminate between the more- and the less-successful firms better than any other variable. Almost all of the strategy questions that relate to innovative activity receive higher scores from the more-successful group of firms than from the less-successful group of firms. This is also the case for innovative activities -- whether a firm possesses an R&D unit, its expenditure on R&D relative to total investment, and its R&D-to-sales ratio.

    Release date: 1995-02-28

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