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All (8)

All (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 61F0019X19970044038
    Description:

    Profiles are available by type of business (unincorporated, incorporated, and both combined) for about 680 different industries in Canada. They are also produced for each province and territory, but with reduced industry detail. This article focuses on revenue, profit, assets and equity.

    Release date: 1998-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998014
    Description:

    This article utilizes information on business startups and closures to examine change and volatility in the service economy. Industries on the cutting edge of technology experience more volatility and are also the fastest growing. Many firms enter the business services and communication industries to seize opportunities offered by technological advances but many are also forced out by the stiff competition. The information-intensive industries (software developers and advertising services firms) are almost twice as volatile as the knowledge-based industries. The latter have low business entry and exit rates because the amount of human capital required to set up a professional practice is large and takes years to acquire.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1996007
    Description:

    The insurance industry in Canada is at a crossroads. The regulatory authorities are currently exploring whether or not to allow banks to sell insurance products. To gain a better understanding of the impact of such a decision, this paper examines the Canadian property and casualty insurance industry, during the 1987-1992 period. Emphasis is placed on the distinction between the direct insurance and reinsurance markets. The paper also analyzes the industry's market concentration by product line and compares the behaviour and performance of Canadian and foreign-controlled firms.

    The analysis reveals a generally competitive market, in which many small firms co-exist with some very large ones. Foreign-controlled firms outnumber their Canadian counterparts, but are on average smaller and account for only one-quarter of the market. There is a substantial number of firms that specialize in a single product. These firms tend to operate in the largest markets, where they can spread the risk either among a large pool of customers, or through reinsurance. No correlation was found between firm size and efficiency.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1997011
    Description:

    This paper describes the financial intermediation activity of insurance companies and its similarities to the activity of the other financial intermediaries. The financial intermediation activity encompasses the issue of financial instruments such as claims, the use of the funds collected to make loans and the acquisition of a variety of other financial assets. An insurance policy is a claim on the insurance company, albeit a contingent one, just as a bank deposit is a claim on the bank.

    Several major trends seem to be emerging regarding the product mix of these companies. With regard to life insurance, the decline of whole life policies in favour of term policies for almost 20 years seems to be irreversible. Furthermore, there has been a substantial increase in the share of annuities (especially individual annuities) at the expense of life insurance.

    The paper also outlines a cross country comparison of life and non-life insurance industry asset structures. Each type of company establishes its own investment strategy to suit its own needs: life insurance companies prefer long-term assets with returns that maintain purchasing power, and non-life insurance companies generally prefer more liquid assets. Regulation also seems to affect the asset structure at the national and international levels. For a number of countries, including Canada, regulation seems to favour investments in less risky assets, such as government bonds, instead of in the stock market.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998128
    Description:

    We provide recent evidence on job characteristics by firm size in Canada. Using a variety of household surveys, we assemble a wide set of facts on wages, fringe benefits and work schedules in small and large firms. We show that the wage gap between small and large firms has reamined fairly stable over the past decade. After controlling for observable worker characteristics and industry-specific effects, large firms pay 15-20% more than small firms. Pension plan coverage remains at least four times higher in large firms than in small firms. While the gap in pension coverage between small and large firms has not increased over time for men, there is some evidence that it has increased for women. We assess the extent to which work schedules vary between small and large firms. Our results indicate that compared to workers in large firms, employees of small firms work at least as many weekly hours. Furthermore, they are more likely to work more than five days per week. This implies that the firm size wage premium cannot be explained by a longer workweek in large firms. As long as workers prefer working during the day, the greater frequency of shift work in large, goods-producing companies is one dimension along which work schedules are less desirable in large firms. According to the theory of compensating differentials, the size-wage differential may partially reflect the willingness of large firms to compensate workers for shift work. We test this hypothesis and conclude that shift work has virtually no effect on the firm size wage premium. Our results emphasize the need to look at several dimensions of work to assess how job quality varies between small and large firms.

    Release date: 1998-11-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 61-525-X
    Description:

    Bankruptcy rates have been increasing in Canada. Almost half of the firms in Canada that go bankrupt do so primarily because of their own deficiencies rather than externally generated problems. They do not develop the basic internal strengths to survive. Overall weakness in management, combined with a lack of market for their product, cause these firms to fail.

    This study suggests that the underlying factor contributing to financial difficulties is management failure rather than external factors associated with imperfect capital markets. Many bankrupt firms face problems in attaining financing in capital markets; but, it is the internal lack of managerial expertise in many of these firms that prevents exploration of different financing options.

    Release date: 1998-04-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 61-532-X
    Description:

    On September 11 and 12, 1996 Statistics Canada's Business and Trade Statistics Field sponsored its eight annual conference on statistics and economic analysis in Ottawa. The theme of the conference was Canadian Economic Structural Change in the Age of NAFTA. Guest speakers and submitted papers discussed a variety of topics related to economic restructuring and the NAFTA.

    Release date: 1998-02-02

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013498
    Description:

    Amidst evidence that the small business sector, and in particular new businesses, is the main engine of net job creation in the Canadian economy, there has been a renewed public policy focus and research interest on the small business unit. This research concerns topics including business practices, financing, characteristics of business owners, and business demographics. The purpose of these studies is generally to examine the causes of success and/or failure of small businesses.

    Release date: 1998-02-02

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Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 61F0019X19970044038
    Description:

    Profiles are available by type of business (unincorporated, incorporated, and both combined) for about 680 different industries in Canada. They are also produced for each province and territory, but with reduced industry detail. This article focuses on revenue, profit, assets and equity.

    Release date: 1998-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998014
    Description:

    This article utilizes information on business startups and closures to examine change and volatility in the service economy. Industries on the cutting edge of technology experience more volatility and are also the fastest growing. Many firms enter the business services and communication industries to seize opportunities offered by technological advances but many are also forced out by the stiff competition. The information-intensive industries (software developers and advertising services firms) are almost twice as volatile as the knowledge-based industries. The latter have low business entry and exit rates because the amount of human capital required to set up a professional practice is large and takes years to acquire.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1996007
    Description:

    The insurance industry in Canada is at a crossroads. The regulatory authorities are currently exploring whether or not to allow banks to sell insurance products. To gain a better understanding of the impact of such a decision, this paper examines the Canadian property and casualty insurance industry, during the 1987-1992 period. Emphasis is placed on the distinction between the direct insurance and reinsurance markets. The paper also analyzes the industry's market concentration by product line and compares the behaviour and performance of Canadian and foreign-controlled firms.

    The analysis reveals a generally competitive market, in which many small firms co-exist with some very large ones. Foreign-controlled firms outnumber their Canadian counterparts, but are on average smaller and account for only one-quarter of the market. There is a substantial number of firms that specialize in a single product. These firms tend to operate in the largest markets, where they can spread the risk either among a large pool of customers, or through reinsurance. No correlation was found between firm size and efficiency.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1997011
    Description:

    This paper describes the financial intermediation activity of insurance companies and its similarities to the activity of the other financial intermediaries. The financial intermediation activity encompasses the issue of financial instruments such as claims, the use of the funds collected to make loans and the acquisition of a variety of other financial assets. An insurance policy is a claim on the insurance company, albeit a contingent one, just as a bank deposit is a claim on the bank.

    Several major trends seem to be emerging regarding the product mix of these companies. With regard to life insurance, the decline of whole life policies in favour of term policies for almost 20 years seems to be irreversible. Furthermore, there has been a substantial increase in the share of annuities (especially individual annuities) at the expense of life insurance.

    The paper also outlines a cross country comparison of life and non-life insurance industry asset structures. Each type of company establishes its own investment strategy to suit its own needs: life insurance companies prefer long-term assets with returns that maintain purchasing power, and non-life insurance companies generally prefer more liquid assets. Regulation also seems to affect the asset structure at the national and international levels. For a number of countries, including Canada, regulation seems to favour investments in less risky assets, such as government bonds, instead of in the stock market.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998128
    Description:

    We provide recent evidence on job characteristics by firm size in Canada. Using a variety of household surveys, we assemble a wide set of facts on wages, fringe benefits and work schedules in small and large firms. We show that the wage gap between small and large firms has reamined fairly stable over the past decade. After controlling for observable worker characteristics and industry-specific effects, large firms pay 15-20% more than small firms. Pension plan coverage remains at least four times higher in large firms than in small firms. While the gap in pension coverage between small and large firms has not increased over time for men, there is some evidence that it has increased for women. We assess the extent to which work schedules vary between small and large firms. Our results indicate that compared to workers in large firms, employees of small firms work at least as many weekly hours. Furthermore, they are more likely to work more than five days per week. This implies that the firm size wage premium cannot be explained by a longer workweek in large firms. As long as workers prefer working during the day, the greater frequency of shift work in large, goods-producing companies is one dimension along which work schedules are less desirable in large firms. According to the theory of compensating differentials, the size-wage differential may partially reflect the willingness of large firms to compensate workers for shift work. We test this hypothesis and conclude that shift work has virtually no effect on the firm size wage premium. Our results emphasize the need to look at several dimensions of work to assess how job quality varies between small and large firms.

    Release date: 1998-11-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 61-525-X
    Description:

    Bankruptcy rates have been increasing in Canada. Almost half of the firms in Canada that go bankrupt do so primarily because of their own deficiencies rather than externally generated problems. They do not develop the basic internal strengths to survive. Overall weakness in management, combined with a lack of market for their product, cause these firms to fail.

    This study suggests that the underlying factor contributing to financial difficulties is management failure rather than external factors associated with imperfect capital markets. Many bankrupt firms face problems in attaining financing in capital markets; but, it is the internal lack of managerial expertise in many of these firms that prevents exploration of different financing options.

    Release date: 1998-04-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 61-532-X
    Description:

    On September 11 and 12, 1996 Statistics Canada's Business and Trade Statistics Field sponsored its eight annual conference on statistics and economic analysis in Ottawa. The theme of the conference was Canadian Economic Structural Change in the Age of NAFTA. Guest speakers and submitted papers discussed a variety of topics related to economic restructuring and the NAFTA.

    Release date: 1998-02-02

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013498
    Description:

    Amidst evidence that the small business sector, and in particular new businesses, is the main engine of net job creation in the Canadian economy, there has been a renewed public policy focus and research interest on the small business unit. This research concerns topics including business practices, financing, characteristics of business owners, and business demographics. The purpose of these studies is generally to examine the causes of success and/or failure of small businesses.

    Release date: 1998-02-02

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