Statistics by subject – Business performance and ownership

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All (9) (9 of 9 results)

  • Articles and reports: 61F0019X19990035563
    Description:

    The following article was compiled and published by Industry Canada and reprinted here with permission. It is based on the Micro-Economic Monitor Special Report: "Aboriginal Entrepreneurs in Canada - Progress & Prospects", a collaboration between the Department's Micro-Economic Policy Analysis Branch and Aboriginal Business Canada program. The Report combined findings from two Statistics Canada sources: the 1996 Census of Population and the 1996 Aboriginal Business Survey (ABS). The ABS was administered to a sample of some 2,500 Aboriginal business owners from across Canada.

    Release date: 1999-09-30

  • Technical products: 61F0041M
    Description:

    These papers consist of research related to business and trade statistics.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 68F0015X
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is to provide some general background and describe the methodology of the pilot year Unified Enterprise Survey (UES). It also illustrates the role of the Unified Enterprise Survey Program (UESP) within The Project to Improve Provincial Economic Statistics (PIPES) program. This information package is targeted toward external clients, for example the Provincial Focal Points, enabling them to assess future data releases planned by industry sector. The scope of this information package will be expanded as subsequent data releases over the next six months or so provide more industry specific details for the seven new pilot industries included in the 1997 UES. This document is approximately twenty-two pages in length and is to be offered at no charge to callers requesting information on the UES.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 61F0019X19990025579
    Description:

    The Unified Enterprise Survey (UES) incorporates several annual business surveys into an integrated survey framework. It aims to ensure Statistics Canada receives consistent and integrated data from many types and sizes of businesses, with enough detail to produce accurate provincial statistics. This year, 17 industry surveys are included in the UES, as well as two cross-industry surveys of large enterprises.

    Release date: 1999-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 61F0019X19990025574
    Description:

    From 1989 until 1992, according to the Labour Force Survey data, total employment declined by 1.9%, due mainly to a reduction in full-time jobs in the goods service. Moreover this decline in employment in the goods sector, did not stop until 1993 and employment in this sector has still not recovered to its 1989 level.

    Release date: 1999-06-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-517-X
    Description:

    New firms are seen to play a key role in the innovation process, especially in certain key sectors of the economy. This study therefore examines the differences in the profiles of successful new firms in science-based industries and other industries. The firms that are examined are entrants who survey into their early teen years. The study examines numerous factors that are seen to influence the success of new businesses. These include the competitive environment, business strategies and the financial structure of the businesses.

    Successful new firms in science-based industries are found to differ in a number of dimensions from new firms in other industries. They are more likely to be exporters. They face greater technological change and intense competition with regards to the rate at which new products are being introduced. They tend to put more emphasis on quality, the frequent introduction of new products and the customization of products. They make greater use of information technology. They place more stress on new technology development, research and development facilities and the use of intellectual property. They are much more likely to innovate and they place more importance on recruiting skilled labour and on training. Finally, they are more likely to use non-traditional financial measures to evaluate performance and they are less likely to rely on secured credit for financing both their research and development activity and their machinery and equipment that are firms in other sectors.

    Release date: 1999-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998004
    Description:

    A defining feature of rural populations is that they are distant from major metropolitan centres. Thus, households in rural areas have different needs than those in urban areas and, therefore, different spending patterns. In 1996, the total expenditure of an average Canadian household was $49,054. Rural households spent an average of $42,620 while urban households had an average spending of $50,283. This article gives an overview of the differences and similarities in the spending patterns of rural and urban households.

    Release date: 1999-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999121
    Description:

    Entry and exit are important phenomena. This paper reviews the evidence on the size of this process and its contribution to productivity and innovation. It then develops a detailed portrait of the characteristics of new firms that survive and those that fail. In doing so, it examines the type of competencies that are developed in both groups of firms. It asks which competencies are developed by new firms. In particular, it focuses on the innovative capabilities of new firms. It shows that small firms in general and entrants in particular are heterogeneous when it comes to their innovative activity. The types of innovative activity in which they are engaged vary widely. Some focus on research and development (R&D) and new products. Others focus on new technologies. Still others stress the development of human capital. In addition, this paper examines the competitive environment that new firms face and the connection between growth and innovation. It also examines the complementary skills that are employed by innovators. Finally, the paper focuses on the causes of failure in the firm population. It extends earlier work that finds that failing firms differ from surviving firms in terms of basic competencies-management, financial management and marketing capabilities.

    Release date: 1999-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998003
    Description:

    One component of a development strategy for rural communities is often to promote the establishment and growth of business enterprises. The purpose of this bulletin is to provide an overview of businesses with one or more employees located in smaller communities (incorporated towns and municipalities with less than 20,000 population).

    Release date: 1999-02-22

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  • Articles and reports: 61F0019X19990035563
    Description:

    The following article was compiled and published by Industry Canada and reprinted here with permission. It is based on the Micro-Economic Monitor Special Report: "Aboriginal Entrepreneurs in Canada - Progress & Prospects", a collaboration between the Department's Micro-Economic Policy Analysis Branch and Aboriginal Business Canada program. The Report combined findings from two Statistics Canada sources: the 1996 Census of Population and the 1996 Aboriginal Business Survey (ABS). The ABS was administered to a sample of some 2,500 Aboriginal business owners from across Canada.

    Release date: 1999-09-30

  • Articles and reports: 61F0019X19990025579
    Description:

    The Unified Enterprise Survey (UES) incorporates several annual business surveys into an integrated survey framework. It aims to ensure Statistics Canada receives consistent and integrated data from many types and sizes of businesses, with enough detail to produce accurate provincial statistics. This year, 17 industry surveys are included in the UES, as well as two cross-industry surveys of large enterprises.

    Release date: 1999-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 61F0019X19990025574
    Description:

    From 1989 until 1992, according to the Labour Force Survey data, total employment declined by 1.9%, due mainly to a reduction in full-time jobs in the goods service. Moreover this decline in employment in the goods sector, did not stop until 1993 and employment in this sector has still not recovered to its 1989 level.

    Release date: 1999-06-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-517-X
    Description:

    New firms are seen to play a key role in the innovation process, especially in certain key sectors of the economy. This study therefore examines the differences in the profiles of successful new firms in science-based industries and other industries. The firms that are examined are entrants who survey into their early teen years. The study examines numerous factors that are seen to influence the success of new businesses. These include the competitive environment, business strategies and the financial structure of the businesses.

    Successful new firms in science-based industries are found to differ in a number of dimensions from new firms in other industries. They are more likely to be exporters. They face greater technological change and intense competition with regards to the rate at which new products are being introduced. They tend to put more emphasis on quality, the frequent introduction of new products and the customization of products. They make greater use of information technology. They place more stress on new technology development, research and development facilities and the use of intellectual property. They are much more likely to innovate and they place more importance on recruiting skilled labour and on training. Finally, they are more likely to use non-traditional financial measures to evaluate performance and they are less likely to rely on secured credit for financing both their research and development activity and their machinery and equipment that are firms in other sectors.

    Release date: 1999-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998004
    Description:

    A defining feature of rural populations is that they are distant from major metropolitan centres. Thus, households in rural areas have different needs than those in urban areas and, therefore, different spending patterns. In 1996, the total expenditure of an average Canadian household was $49,054. Rural households spent an average of $42,620 while urban households had an average spending of $50,283. This article gives an overview of the differences and similarities in the spending patterns of rural and urban households.

    Release date: 1999-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999121
    Description:

    Entry and exit are important phenomena. This paper reviews the evidence on the size of this process and its contribution to productivity and innovation. It then develops a detailed portrait of the characteristics of new firms that survive and those that fail. In doing so, it examines the type of competencies that are developed in both groups of firms. It asks which competencies are developed by new firms. In particular, it focuses on the innovative capabilities of new firms. It shows that small firms in general and entrants in particular are heterogeneous when it comes to their innovative activity. The types of innovative activity in which they are engaged vary widely. Some focus on research and development (R&D) and new products. Others focus on new technologies. Still others stress the development of human capital. In addition, this paper examines the competitive environment that new firms face and the connection between growth and innovation. It also examines the complementary skills that are employed by innovators. Finally, the paper focuses on the causes of failure in the firm population. It extends earlier work that finds that failing firms differ from surviving firms in terms of basic competencies-management, financial management and marketing capabilities.

    Release date: 1999-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998003
    Description:

    One component of a development strategy for rural communities is often to promote the establishment and growth of business enterprises. The purpose of this bulletin is to provide an overview of businesses with one or more employees located in smaller communities (incorporated towns and municipalities with less than 20,000 population).

    Release date: 1999-02-22

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Technical products: 61F0041M
    Description:

    These papers consist of research related to business and trade statistics.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 68F0015X
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is to provide some general background and describe the methodology of the pilot year Unified Enterprise Survey (UES). It also illustrates the role of the Unified Enterprise Survey Program (UESP) within The Project to Improve Provincial Economic Statistics (PIPES) program. This information package is targeted toward external clients, for example the Provincial Focal Points, enabling them to assess future data releases planned by industry sector. The scope of this information package will be expanded as subsequent data releases over the next six months or so provide more industry specific details for the seven new pilot industries included in the 1997 UES. This document is approximately twenty-two pages in length and is to be offered at no charge to callers requesting information on the UES.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

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