Statistics by subject – Business performance and ownership

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (7)

All (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2002002
    Description:

    The paper examines the possible explanations for deviations from purchasing power parity (PPP) between Canada and the United States in the 1980s and 1990s and investigates both the productivity effect and the underlying PPP assumption for tradable goods.

    Release date: 2002-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002189
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring size of entry. The main purpose of this paper is to summarize the information we have on the amount of entry in Canada.

    The paper also fulfils another purpose. Some studies have focused on cross-country comparisons (Geroski and Schwalbach 1991; OECD 2001). Interpretation of the results of these studies is difficult unless methodological issues regarding how entry is measured are addressed. Without an understanding of the extent to which different databases produce different results, international comparisons are difficult to evaluate. Cross-country comparisons that are derived from extremely different data sources may be misleading because of the lack of comparability.

    Since there is more than one reliable database that can be used to estimate entry in Canada, this paper asks how measured entry rates vary across different Canadian databases. By examining the difference in entry rates produced by these databases, we provide an estimate of the range or confidence interval that should be used in evaluating whether there are real differences in measured entry rates across countries. We also offer guidance as to the questions that should be asked about the databases used by researchers who conduct international studies. Finally, we make suggestions as to areas of comparison on which international studies should focus.

    Release date: 2002-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002190
    Description:

    This paper investigates the financial characteristics of new small firms. The analysis develops a representative, small-firm financial profile and evaluates the extent to which the proportionate use of different instruments and sources is correlated with industry-level and firm-specific characteristics. Multivariate methods are then used to examine relationships among financial structure, R&D intensity, and innovation.

    Our results suggest that relationships between knowledge intensity and capital structure are bidirectional. After a range of industry- and firm-level covariates are controlled for, firms that devote a higher percentage of their investment expenditure to R&D also exhibit fewer debt-intensive structures. Conversely, debt-intensive structures also act to constrain investments in R&D. These relationships, however, depend upon the type of debt in the asset mix. It is the share of long-term debt to total assets that is negatively related to investments in knowledge.

    Release date: 2002-05-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2002003
    Description:

    This paper examines small producers in the Canadian and U.S. manufacturing sectors in terms of output and employment from the early 1970s to the late 1990s.

    Release date: 2002-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2002038
    Description:

    During the last decade, the Canadian property and casualty insurance industry underwent considerable consolidation, which has resulted in a smaller number of non-government companies serving a larger share of the industry's market. After describing the industry's role, characteristics, financial performance, and importance to the overall economy, this article examines motivations for and evidence of consolidation in the property and casualty insurance industry between 1988 and early 2001.

    Findings include moderate financial growth overall despite a steady decrease in the number of licensed companies in the industry. The overall decrease in the number of companies is due more to market exits than mergers or amalgamations. Nevertheless, ownership changes have also increased the concentration of market share under the largest groups of affiliated insurance companies.

    Release date: 2002-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002179
    Description:

    This paper studies changes in diversification of firms and plants since the early 1970s in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It finds that there has been a general increase in specialization of both firms and plants. Firms have been continuously reducing the span of industries in which they operate, particularly when the industries are unrelated. Commodity specialization has also occurred at the plant level; however, in contrast to industry specialization, the pace of commodity specialization increased emerged late in the period, around the time of implementation of the Free Trade Agreement between Canada and the United States. Plant specialization increased most in those plants that moved most strongly into export markets.

    Release date: 2002-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20010036067
    Description:

    This article presents a general statistical profile of the life and health insurance industry amidst a rapidly changing financial services landscape in Canada. The economic performance of the industry is analyzed in terms of economic output, employment and industrial structure over a ten-year period from 1988 to 1998.

    Release date: 2002-01-23

Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Analysis (7)

Analysis (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2002002
    Description:

    The paper examines the possible explanations for deviations from purchasing power parity (PPP) between Canada and the United States in the 1980s and 1990s and investigates both the productivity effect and the underlying PPP assumption for tradable goods.

    Release date: 2002-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002189
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring size of entry. The main purpose of this paper is to summarize the information we have on the amount of entry in Canada.

    The paper also fulfils another purpose. Some studies have focused on cross-country comparisons (Geroski and Schwalbach 1991; OECD 2001). Interpretation of the results of these studies is difficult unless methodological issues regarding how entry is measured are addressed. Without an understanding of the extent to which different databases produce different results, international comparisons are difficult to evaluate. Cross-country comparisons that are derived from extremely different data sources may be misleading because of the lack of comparability.

    Since there is more than one reliable database that can be used to estimate entry in Canada, this paper asks how measured entry rates vary across different Canadian databases. By examining the difference in entry rates produced by these databases, we provide an estimate of the range or confidence interval that should be used in evaluating whether there are real differences in measured entry rates across countries. We also offer guidance as to the questions that should be asked about the databases used by researchers who conduct international studies. Finally, we make suggestions as to areas of comparison on which international studies should focus.

    Release date: 2002-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002190
    Description:

    This paper investigates the financial characteristics of new small firms. The analysis develops a representative, small-firm financial profile and evaluates the extent to which the proportionate use of different instruments and sources is correlated with industry-level and firm-specific characteristics. Multivariate methods are then used to examine relationships among financial structure, R&D intensity, and innovation.

    Our results suggest that relationships between knowledge intensity and capital structure are bidirectional. After a range of industry- and firm-level covariates are controlled for, firms that devote a higher percentage of their investment expenditure to R&D also exhibit fewer debt-intensive structures. Conversely, debt-intensive structures also act to constrain investments in R&D. These relationships, however, depend upon the type of debt in the asset mix. It is the share of long-term debt to total assets that is negatively related to investments in knowledge.

    Release date: 2002-05-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2002003
    Description:

    This paper examines small producers in the Canadian and U.S. manufacturing sectors in terms of output and employment from the early 1970s to the late 1990s.

    Release date: 2002-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2002038
    Description:

    During the last decade, the Canadian property and casualty insurance industry underwent considerable consolidation, which has resulted in a smaller number of non-government companies serving a larger share of the industry's market. After describing the industry's role, characteristics, financial performance, and importance to the overall economy, this article examines motivations for and evidence of consolidation in the property and casualty insurance industry between 1988 and early 2001.

    Findings include moderate financial growth overall despite a steady decrease in the number of licensed companies in the industry. The overall decrease in the number of companies is due more to market exits than mergers or amalgamations. Nevertheless, ownership changes have also increased the concentration of market share under the largest groups of affiliated insurance companies.

    Release date: 2002-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002179
    Description:

    This paper studies changes in diversification of firms and plants since the early 1970s in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It finds that there has been a general increase in specialization of both firms and plants. Firms have been continuously reducing the span of industries in which they operate, particularly when the industries are unrelated. Commodity specialization has also occurred at the plant level; however, in contrast to industry specialization, the pace of commodity specialization increased emerged late in the period, around the time of implementation of the Free Trade Agreement between Canada and the United States. Plant specialization increased most in those plants that moved most strongly into export markets.

    Release date: 2002-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20010036067
    Description:

    This article presents a general statistical profile of the life and health insurance industry amidst a rapidly changing financial services landscape in Canada. The economic performance of the industry is analyzed in terms of economic output, employment and industrial structure over a ten-year period from 1988 to 1998.

    Release date: 2002-01-23

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: