Statistics by subject – Business performance and ownership

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All (13)

All (13) (13 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009082
    Description:

    Using data from Quarterly Financial Statistics (QFS) for Enterprises and National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA), this article examines the indebtedness and liquidity position of Canadian non-financial corporations from 1961 to 2009. Recent trends in these two financial indicators are also presented by industry.

    Release date: 2009-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200901010945
    Description:

    A detailed look at the sudden drop in Canada's exports and imports starting last autumn finds that 80% of their declines was concentrated in energy, autos and industrial goods. Consumer and agricultural goods were largely unaffected by the recession.

    Release date: 2009-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2009024
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of the unincorporated sector using the number of self-employed and gross domestic product (GDP), in that sector over the period 1987 to 2005.

    Self-employment studies have analyzed various characteristics of self-employed workers, including age, sex, immigration status and education, but have generally lacked measures of GDP associated with unincorporated self-employment. This study redresses the lack of economic data, and estimates GDP by industry arising from unincorporated self-employment. This paper updates the 1997 - 2002 estimates of unincorporated GDP derived by Rispoli (2009).

    The paper also examines how unincorporated self-employment responded to both overall economic trends and business cycles. The rate of unincorporated self-employment was positively correlated to the unemployment rate in the long run.

    The paper also looks at incorporated self-employment. (Close to one million self-employed were incorporated in 2005). It investigates its relationship to the same macroeconomic conditions to determine if incorporated self-employment has a profile similar to unincorporated self-employment. Previous self-employment studies have typically treated self-employment as a homogeneous group. This paper examines the differences between the two groups and finds that they react differently to macroeconomic conditions.

    Incorporated self-employment grew substantially between 1987 and 1999 (averaging 3.8% per year), and continued to grow between 2000 and 2005 (averaging 4.1% per year). The evidence suggests that a shift in self-employment did not occur from unincorporated enterprises to corporations, but that different forces were at work in the two sectors. Over the long run, the unincorporated self-employment rate is positively correlated to the unemployment rate. In contrast, the incorporated self-employment rate is not related to changes in the unemployment rate, but is positively correlated to overall GDP growth.

    Release date: 2009-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900910924
    Description:

    The growth of unincorporated GDP fell below corporate GDP in recent years, after similar increases in the two sectors through most of the 1990s. The slowdown was more pronounced for self-employment, after much faster growth in the 1990s.

    Release date: 2009-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009057
    Description:

    This paper examines the challenges that the manufacturing sector has faced over the last half century focusing on both long- and short-term performance. It first examines whether there is evidence that this sector is in long-term decline. The paper also investigates how the industry has responded to specific shocks during this period from exchange-rate movements, trade liberalization and business cycles. It finds little evidence of long-term decline. Rather it describes how manufacturing has adapted to varying challenges, whether from demand shifts due to business cycles, relative price shifts associated with exchange rate shocks or changes in tariff regimes.

    Release date: 2009-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900610893
    Description:

    Using national accounts data on the financial flows, balance sheets and Canada's international investments, this paper shows how the crisis in financial markets has affected financial behaviour in Canada.

    Release date: 2009-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009056
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of plants in the manufacturing sector undergoing changes in ownership to further our understanding of the underlying causes of mergers and acquisitions. Previous Canadian studies (Baldwin 1995; Baldwin and Caves 1991) compare the performance of merged plants at the beginning and the end of the 1970s. This paper examines annual changes that occurred over the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to provide a longer-run perspective. In doing so, it outlines the amount of change taking place (both the number of plants affected and the share of employment) and the characteristics of plants that led to their takeover. Differences between foreign and domestic takeovers are also examined.

    Release date: 2009-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900510867
    Description:

    An examination of whether turning points in employment lag output, and whether employers hoard labour during cyclical downturns.

    Release date: 2009-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900410848
    Description:

    A review of the Canadian economy in 2008.

    Release date: 2009-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900310833
    Description:

    Recessions in the United States have been accompanied by a wide range of outcomes in Canada. A review of some of the linkages between the two countries, as well as what defines a recession and other determinants of its severity.

    Release date: 2009-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2009023
    Description:

    This paper sheds light on the contribution of unincorporated enterprises to the Canadian economy in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) from 1997 to 2002. The study separates the aggregate business GDP, including its components, into the unincorporated and incorporated sectors. After describing the key legal and organizational differences between the unincorporated and incorporated sectors, including tax regime, limited liability, and number of entities, employment and capital intensity, it looks at the contribution of the two sectors across various industries. It provides estimates for 25 S-level industries and W-level detail for some of the more important industries of the unincorporated sector. In deriving the estimates, the study used the same data sources as those used in Statistics Canada's Input-Output Accounts. Results of the study suggest that the unincorporated sector contributed $82.2 billion in 2002 representing 10.1% of total business sector GDP, a slight decrease from 11.3% in 1997.

    Release date: 2009-02-19

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009082
    Description:

    Using data from Quarterly Financial Statistics (QFS) for Enterprises and National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA), this article examines the indebtedness and liquidity position of Canadian non-financial corporations from 1961 to 2009. Recent trends in these two financial indicators are also presented by industry.

    Release date: 2009-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200901010945
    Description:

    A detailed look at the sudden drop in Canada's exports and imports starting last autumn finds that 80% of their declines was concentrated in energy, autos and industrial goods. Consumer and agricultural goods were largely unaffected by the recession.

    Release date: 2009-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2009024
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of the unincorporated sector using the number of self-employed and gross domestic product (GDP), in that sector over the period 1987 to 2005.

    Self-employment studies have analyzed various characteristics of self-employed workers, including age, sex, immigration status and education, but have generally lacked measures of GDP associated with unincorporated self-employment. This study redresses the lack of economic data, and estimates GDP by industry arising from unincorporated self-employment. This paper updates the 1997 - 2002 estimates of unincorporated GDP derived by Rispoli (2009).

    The paper also examines how unincorporated self-employment responded to both overall economic trends and business cycles. The rate of unincorporated self-employment was positively correlated to the unemployment rate in the long run.

    The paper also looks at incorporated self-employment. (Close to one million self-employed were incorporated in 2005). It investigates its relationship to the same macroeconomic conditions to determine if incorporated self-employment has a profile similar to unincorporated self-employment. Previous self-employment studies have typically treated self-employment as a homogeneous group. This paper examines the differences between the two groups and finds that they react differently to macroeconomic conditions.

    Incorporated self-employment grew substantially between 1987 and 1999 (averaging 3.8% per year), and continued to grow between 2000 and 2005 (averaging 4.1% per year). The evidence suggests that a shift in self-employment did not occur from unincorporated enterprises to corporations, but that different forces were at work in the two sectors. Over the long run, the unincorporated self-employment rate is positively correlated to the unemployment rate. In contrast, the incorporated self-employment rate is not related to changes in the unemployment rate, but is positively correlated to overall GDP growth.

    Release date: 2009-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900910924
    Description:

    The growth of unincorporated GDP fell below corporate GDP in recent years, after similar increases in the two sectors through most of the 1990s. The slowdown was more pronounced for self-employment, after much faster growth in the 1990s.

    Release date: 2009-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009057
    Description:

    This paper examines the challenges that the manufacturing sector has faced over the last half century focusing on both long- and short-term performance. It first examines whether there is evidence that this sector is in long-term decline. The paper also investigates how the industry has responded to specific shocks during this period from exchange-rate movements, trade liberalization and business cycles. It finds little evidence of long-term decline. Rather it describes how manufacturing has adapted to varying challenges, whether from demand shifts due to business cycles, relative price shifts associated with exchange rate shocks or changes in tariff regimes.

    Release date: 2009-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900610893
    Description:

    Using national accounts data on the financial flows, balance sheets and Canada's international investments, this paper shows how the crisis in financial markets has affected financial behaviour in Canada.

    Release date: 2009-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009056
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of plants in the manufacturing sector undergoing changes in ownership to further our understanding of the underlying causes of mergers and acquisitions. Previous Canadian studies (Baldwin 1995; Baldwin and Caves 1991) compare the performance of merged plants at the beginning and the end of the 1970s. This paper examines annual changes that occurred over the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to provide a longer-run perspective. In doing so, it outlines the amount of change taking place (both the number of plants affected and the share of employment) and the characteristics of plants that led to their takeover. Differences between foreign and domestic takeovers are also examined.

    Release date: 2009-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900510867
    Description:

    An examination of whether turning points in employment lag output, and whether employers hoard labour during cyclical downturns.

    Release date: 2009-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900410848
    Description:

    A review of the Canadian economy in 2008.

    Release date: 2009-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900310833
    Description:

    Recessions in the United States have been accompanied by a wide range of outcomes in Canada. A review of some of the linkages between the two countries, as well as what defines a recession and other determinants of its severity.

    Release date: 2009-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2009023
    Description:

    This paper sheds light on the contribution of unincorporated enterprises to the Canadian economy in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) from 1997 to 2002. The study separates the aggregate business GDP, including its components, into the unincorporated and incorporated sectors. After describing the key legal and organizational differences between the unincorporated and incorporated sectors, including tax regime, limited liability, and number of entities, employment and capital intensity, it looks at the contribution of the two sectors across various industries. It provides estimates for 25 S-level industries and W-level detail for some of the more important industries of the unincorporated sector. In deriving the estimates, the study used the same data sources as those used in Statistics Canada's Input-Output Accounts. Results of the study suggest that the unincorporated sector contributed $82.2 billion in 2002 representing 10.1% of total business sector GDP, a slight decrease from 11.3% in 1997.

    Release date: 2009-02-19

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