Statistics by subject – Business performance and ownership

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All (11)

All (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011075
    Description:

    Labour productivity growth in the Canadian business sector slowed substantially after 2000. Most of the slowdown occurred in the manufacturing sector. This paper examines how this slowdown was associated with the restructuring that occurred in manufacturing as a result of the increase in excess capacity, the dramatic increase in the Canada-U.S. exchange rate and a slowdown in export growth.

    Release date: 2011-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011073
    Description:

    This paper examines how the nature of self-employment may have changed, by comparing the labour market transition rates for males (between non-employment, paid employment, own-account self-employment, and self-employment with paid help) in two panels of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID): the 1993-1998 panel and the 2002-2007 panel. An econometric model is then estimated for the purpose of characterizing the change further.

    Release date: 2011-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100911554
    Description:

    Canada's exports have been slower to recover from the recession than our major trading partners. This paper examines which export sectors have lagged in the recovery, and compares the composition and destination of Canada's exports with the United States and the European Union.

    Release date: 2011-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2011021
    Description:

    Do exporters and foreign-controlled establishments pay their workers higher wages than non-exporters and domestic-controlled establishments? This paper draws on an employer-employee dataset to explore the existence of exporter and foreign-controlled wage premiums in the Canadian manufacturing sector.

    Trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) are central to the process of globalization. Over the last 50 years, advocates of greater trade and FDI liberalization have been guided by the notion that removing barriers to both stimulates economic growth. An extensive body of work using newly available micro-data files has emerged comparing the productivity levels of exporters against those of non-exporters, and of foreign-controlled firms against those of domestic firms.

    Release date: 2011-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011071
    Description:

    This paper asks how the performance of self-employed unincorporated businesses affects the size of the gap in labour productivity between Canada and the United States. To do so, the business sector in each country is divided into unincorporated and corporate businesses, and estimates of labour productivity are generated for each sector.

    The productivity performance of the unincorporated sector relative to the corporate sector is much lower in Canada than in the United States. As a result, when the unincorporated sector is removed from the estimates for the business sector in each country and only the corporate sectors for the two countries are compared, the gap in the level of productivity between Canada and the United States is reduced.

    The unincorporated sector consists of both sole proprietorships and partnerships. This paper also investigates the impact of just sole proprietorships on the Canada-United States productivity gap. Sole proprietorships in the two countries more closely resemble one another than do partnerships, as U.S. partnerships are much larger than their Canadian counterparts.

    When sole proprietorships are removed from the business-sector estimates of each country (allowing a comparison of sole proprietorships to the rest of the business sector, which consists of partnerships and the corporate sector), the gap in labour productivity between Canada and the United States also declines but by only about half as much as when both sole proprietorships and partnerships are removed.

    The lower productivity of the unincorporated sector (both sole proprietorships and partnerships) accounted for almost the entire productivity gap between Canada and the United States in 1998. Since then, the productivity of the corporate sector in Canada has fallen relative to that of the corporate sector in the United States and the unincorporated sector no longer accounts for the entire gap.

    Release date: 2011-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011070
    Description:

    Adopting the methodology used to produce estimates of gross domestic product (GDP) by size for the United States, this paper estimates GDP for small and medium-sized businesses versus large businesses for the Canadian non-agricultural business sector in 2005. In the entire non-agricultural business sector, small and medium-sized businesses with less than 500 employees account for 54.2% of GDP in Canada and for 50.7% of GDP in the United States. When two industries with heavy government ownership in Canada (health and education) are excluded, the results are 52.9% and 50.3%, respectively.

    Release date: 2011-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011069
    Description:

    The paper estimates the contributions to gross domestic product (GDP) made by small, medium-sized and large businesses in the Canadian business sector for 2005. The contribution of large businesses with 500 or more employees to business-sector GDP was 45.7%. Small and medium-sized businesses, including unincorporated businesses, accounted for the other 54.3%.

    Release date: 2011-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010065
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the authors provide a detailed social accounting matrix (SAM), which incorporates the income and financial flows into the standard input-output matrix, for the Canadian economy for 2004. Second, they use the SAM to assess the strength of the real-financial linkages by calculating and comparing real SAM multipliers and financial social accounting matrix (FSAM) multipliers. For FSAM multipliers, financial flows are endogenous, whereas for real SAM multipliers they are not. The results show that taking into account financial flows increases the impact of a final demand shock on Canadian output. Financial flows also play an important role in determining the cumulative effect of an income shock or the availability of investment funds. Between 2008 and the first half of 2009, financial institutions shifted their investments toward government bonds, short-term paper, and foreign investments. This shift together with the fact that non-financial institutions were unwilling or unable to increase their financial liabilities, led to estimated declines in all GDP multipliers between 2008 and the first half of 2009 (2009H1). The main advantage of using the extended input-output analysis is that it provides a simple framework, with very few assumptions, which allows the assessment of the strength of real-financial linkages by means of multipliers. However, the methodology is subject to the Lucas critique, that as shocks shift prices, agents cannot adjust. Such a framework is, nevertheless, appropriate in short-term impact analysis such as this study.

    Release date: 2011-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100311422
    Description:

    Business investment has played a key role in the recent recession and recovery. Energy and mining led the recovery in 2010, and intentions point to continued growth in 2011. Manufacturers also expect to invest more in 2011, although investment spending in this sector continues to diverge widely between expanding and contracting industries.

    Release date: 2011-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100111401
    Description:

    The 2008-2009 recession was less severe for both output and jobs than the two previous recessions. While the disruption of global financial markets did lead to a record drop in exports and severe cuts in business investment, household demand did not recede as much as in previous downturns and led the recovery. Canada is the only G7 nation to have returned to its pre-recession level, led by private domestic demand.

    Release date: 2011-01-13

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Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011075
    Description:

    Labour productivity growth in the Canadian business sector slowed substantially after 2000. Most of the slowdown occurred in the manufacturing sector. This paper examines how this slowdown was associated with the restructuring that occurred in manufacturing as a result of the increase in excess capacity, the dramatic increase in the Canada-U.S. exchange rate and a slowdown in export growth.

    Release date: 2011-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011073
    Description:

    This paper examines how the nature of self-employment may have changed, by comparing the labour market transition rates for males (between non-employment, paid employment, own-account self-employment, and self-employment with paid help) in two panels of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID): the 1993-1998 panel and the 2002-2007 panel. An econometric model is then estimated for the purpose of characterizing the change further.

    Release date: 2011-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100911554
    Description:

    Canada's exports have been slower to recover from the recession than our major trading partners. This paper examines which export sectors have lagged in the recovery, and compares the composition and destination of Canada's exports with the United States and the European Union.

    Release date: 2011-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2011021
    Description:

    Do exporters and foreign-controlled establishments pay their workers higher wages than non-exporters and domestic-controlled establishments? This paper draws on an employer-employee dataset to explore the existence of exporter and foreign-controlled wage premiums in the Canadian manufacturing sector.

    Trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) are central to the process of globalization. Over the last 50 years, advocates of greater trade and FDI liberalization have been guided by the notion that removing barriers to both stimulates economic growth. An extensive body of work using newly available micro-data files has emerged comparing the productivity levels of exporters against those of non-exporters, and of foreign-controlled firms against those of domestic firms.

    Release date: 2011-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011071
    Description:

    This paper asks how the performance of self-employed unincorporated businesses affects the size of the gap in labour productivity between Canada and the United States. To do so, the business sector in each country is divided into unincorporated and corporate businesses, and estimates of labour productivity are generated for each sector.

    The productivity performance of the unincorporated sector relative to the corporate sector is much lower in Canada than in the United States. As a result, when the unincorporated sector is removed from the estimates for the business sector in each country and only the corporate sectors for the two countries are compared, the gap in the level of productivity between Canada and the United States is reduced.

    The unincorporated sector consists of both sole proprietorships and partnerships. This paper also investigates the impact of just sole proprietorships on the Canada-United States productivity gap. Sole proprietorships in the two countries more closely resemble one another than do partnerships, as U.S. partnerships are much larger than their Canadian counterparts.

    When sole proprietorships are removed from the business-sector estimates of each country (allowing a comparison of sole proprietorships to the rest of the business sector, which consists of partnerships and the corporate sector), the gap in labour productivity between Canada and the United States also declines but by only about half as much as when both sole proprietorships and partnerships are removed.

    The lower productivity of the unincorporated sector (both sole proprietorships and partnerships) accounted for almost the entire productivity gap between Canada and the United States in 1998. Since then, the productivity of the corporate sector in Canada has fallen relative to that of the corporate sector in the United States and the unincorporated sector no longer accounts for the entire gap.

    Release date: 2011-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011070
    Description:

    Adopting the methodology used to produce estimates of gross domestic product (GDP) by size for the United States, this paper estimates GDP for small and medium-sized businesses versus large businesses for the Canadian non-agricultural business sector in 2005. In the entire non-agricultural business sector, small and medium-sized businesses with less than 500 employees account for 54.2% of GDP in Canada and for 50.7% of GDP in the United States. When two industries with heavy government ownership in Canada (health and education) are excluded, the results are 52.9% and 50.3%, respectively.

    Release date: 2011-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011069
    Description:

    The paper estimates the contributions to gross domestic product (GDP) made by small, medium-sized and large businesses in the Canadian business sector for 2005. The contribution of large businesses with 500 or more employees to business-sector GDP was 45.7%. Small and medium-sized businesses, including unincorporated businesses, accounted for the other 54.3%.

    Release date: 2011-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010065
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the authors provide a detailed social accounting matrix (SAM), which incorporates the income and financial flows into the standard input-output matrix, for the Canadian economy for 2004. Second, they use the SAM to assess the strength of the real-financial linkages by calculating and comparing real SAM multipliers and financial social accounting matrix (FSAM) multipliers. For FSAM multipliers, financial flows are endogenous, whereas for real SAM multipliers they are not. The results show that taking into account financial flows increases the impact of a final demand shock on Canadian output. Financial flows also play an important role in determining the cumulative effect of an income shock or the availability of investment funds. Between 2008 and the first half of 2009, financial institutions shifted their investments toward government bonds, short-term paper, and foreign investments. This shift together with the fact that non-financial institutions were unwilling or unable to increase their financial liabilities, led to estimated declines in all GDP multipliers between 2008 and the first half of 2009 (2009H1). The main advantage of using the extended input-output analysis is that it provides a simple framework, with very few assumptions, which allows the assessment of the strength of real-financial linkages by means of multipliers. However, the methodology is subject to the Lucas critique, that as shocks shift prices, agents cannot adjust. Such a framework is, nevertheless, appropriate in short-term impact analysis such as this study.

    Release date: 2011-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100311422
    Description:

    Business investment has played a key role in the recent recession and recovery. Energy and mining led the recovery in 2010, and intentions point to continued growth in 2011. Manufacturers also expect to invest more in 2011, although investment spending in this sector continues to diverge widely between expanding and contracting industries.

    Release date: 2011-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100111401
    Description:

    The 2008-2009 recession was less severe for both output and jobs than the two previous recessions. While the disruption of global financial markets did lead to a record drop in exports and severe cuts in business investment, household demand did not recede as much as in previous downturns and led the recovery. Canada is the only G7 nation to have returned to its pre-recession level, led by private domestic demand.

    Release date: 2011-01-13

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