Statistics by subject – Child care

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All (40)

All (40) (25 of 40 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-11-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014005
    Description:

    Using data from the 2011 General Social Survey (GSS) on Families, this report provides an overview of child care in Canada, examining its overall use, factors influencing use, types of child care arrangements, and cost.

    Release date: 2014-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111858
    Description:

    What types of caregivers provide the most hours and kinds of care? Which ones are the most likely to experience various consequences associated with family caregiving? This article compares the different types of family caregivers, based on the relationship with their main recipient.

    Release date: 2013-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201300111780
    Description:

    This Juristat article profiles cases enrolled with a Maintenance Enforcement Program (MEP) and examines changes in the payment patterns of child and spousal support over time. It focuses on payors with ongoing monthly support obligations in order to examine changes in the proportion of payors making a monthly support payment during the first years of enrolment in a MEP, changes in enforcement activity, and changes in payors' patterns of payment regularity over time. The analysis draws on information from the Survey of Maintenance Enforcement Programs.

    Release date: 2013-04-24

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200211697
    Description:

    Many parents take time off work to care for a child after birth or adoption. Whether or not parents take leave and the duration of that leave may be influenced by characteristics such as parental employment or child and maternal health factors.

    This article examines children's experiences of parent-reported leave after their birth or adoption. In addition, associations between leave and parent employment and child and maternal health factors are analyzed using data from the 2010 Survey of Young Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-04-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5179
    Release date: 2012-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201200111628
    Description:

    Using data available from the Survey of Maintenance Enforcement Programs, the article profiles a particularly challenging aspect of maintenance enforcement, interjurisdictional support order (ISO) cases of child and spousal support within nine provinces and territories: Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. The article gives a general overview of maintenance enforcement cases, followed by a detailed analysis of ISO cases, and concludes with a look at international ISO cases.

    Release date: 2012-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713167
    Description:

    The division of labour between men and women continues to evolve. Today's couples have a much more equal partnership in sharing financial, child care and household responsibilities. This has been brought about in large part by the expanding economic role of women, which has helped erode the idea that men should be primarily responsible for paid work while women look after unpaid household and family duties.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060089290
    Description:

    As women have entered the labour force in greater numbers, gender differences in the division of labour within families have diminished, with men assuming more housework and child care. Changing work arrangements at home are also leading employers to adapt alternative work arrangements.

    Release date: 2006-08-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006284
    Description:

    The present review provides a description of various Canadian national survey data sets that could be used to examine issues related to child care use. National data sets dealing with patterns of employment, time use, family earnings, social support, and child, adolescent, or adult health measures were included. We conclude that numerous questions remain unanswered in terms of addressing the relationship between patterns of employment, use of child care, family roles and responsibilities, and associations with the health of families. Recommendations are made about information that has not been collected but may prove to be useful in addressing these issues. Moreover, we conclude that existing Canadian national survey data could be used to address several issues related to patterns of care use as well as the impact on children and families.

    Release date: 2006-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2006003
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to profile child care in Canada by focussing on the child care experiences of children aged 6 months to 5 years. The report covers the eight-year period from 1994/95 to 2002/03. Many aspects of child care are discussed including types of care arrangements, hours spent in care, characteristics of and changes in care arrangements, and the use of multiple arrangements. These aspects are compared over time, as are the child care experiences of children from various backgrounds. In addition, patterns in types of care arrangements as children age are discussed.

    Release date: 2006-04-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017033
    Description:

    Delayed marriage, postponement of children, and adults with increasingly long-lived parents have given rise to the 'sandwich generation'. These are individuals caught between the often conflicting demands of caring for children and caring for seniors. Although still relatively small (712,000 in 2002), the ranks of the sandwich generation are likely to grow.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036702
    Description:

    Although generally considered a happy event, the birth of a baby brings with it significant stresses. The transition period of adjusting to the demands of a new lifestyle is often made smoother when parents are able to take some time off work and stay at home with their newborn. Over the years, the Canadian government has extended parental leave several times to allow mothers and fathers more time with their children. This article examines whether parents now remain at home longer with their infants, as well as the socio-demographic factors that influence the length of leave time taken.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036704
    Description:

    This article examines the potential pool of healthcare practitioners who use French at work, as well as those who do not regularly use French in the workplace but who have knowledge of that language, and compares it with the French-speaking population.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-594-X
    Description:

    This paper uses three cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine whether parental labour market participation and the use of substitute child-care influence the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school. The analysis in this paper is based on the arguments that parent-child interaction fosters the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school successfully, and that full-time participation in the work force by lone parents (in one-parent families) and by both parents (in dual-parent families) often results in comparatively less time for parent-child interaction than in families with a stay-at-home parent. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine whether reductions in parental time spent with children as a result of work outside the home impact the intellectual development of young children.

    The study indicates that parental participation in the labour market has little effect on the school readiness scores of most pre-school-aged children. However, children's school readiness does appear to be influenced by parental labour market participation if the parents exhibit above-average parenting skills and levels of parental education. Children of mothers who display above-average parenting skills and higher levels of education tend to benefit slightly when their mothers do not work outside the home. Likewise, children of fathers with above-average education exhibit slightly higher cognitive outcomes if their fathers work part time.

    Although the author finds that there is no association between the number of hours that children spend in child care and their level of school readiness, the study does observe that among pre-school children in substitute child-care, those who come from higher-income families tend to score higher on the school readiness tests than do children from lower-income families. This finding may be attributed to the possibility that children in higher-income families are exposed to a higher quality of substitute child-care, or it may be attributed simply to the advantages of growing up in a family with greater resources.

    Release date: 2003-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026622
    Description:

    This study examines the time volunteers, friends or relatives devote to unpaid informal care.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2002040
    Description:

    The childcare services industry in Canada is unique in that it is entrusted with a precious resource: close to 1.4 million children. Childcare providers assist with the daunting tasks of promoting child development, ensuring children's safety and well-being, and maintaining responsive relationships with individual children.

    This paper examines the childcare services industry in Canada and is divided into three basic parts. First, the article studies the demand for childcare services, including the $3.5 billion spent by households for these services. The financial characteristics of the industry and the roles played by the non-profit sector and government fee-subsidy and grant programs are examined next. And the final section looks at some of the characteristics of the childcare workforce.

    Release date: 2002-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20010046180
    Description:

    This article examines the childcare services industry in Canada and is divided into three basic parts. First it looks at demand for childcare services, including the .5 billion spent by households for these services. Examined next are financial characteristics of the industry and the roles played by the non-profit sector and government fee subsidy and grant programs. The final section looks at some characteristics of the childcare workforce.

    Release date: 2002-04-26

  • Classification: 89F0077X199903A
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is the first Canada-wide survey of children. Starting in 1994, it will gather information on a sample of children and their life experiences. It will follow these children over time. The survey will collect information on children and their families, education, health, development, behaviour, friends, activities, etc.

    Along with 89F0077XPE (or XIE) issue 9903b, this document contains the various questionnaires used to gather information from parents, children, teachers and principals.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

Data (7)

Data (7) (7 of 7 results)

Analysis (28)

Analysis (28) (25 of 28 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-11-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014005
    Description:

    Using data from the 2011 General Social Survey (GSS) on Families, this report provides an overview of child care in Canada, examining its overall use, factors influencing use, types of child care arrangements, and cost.

    Release date: 2014-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111858
    Description:

    What types of caregivers provide the most hours and kinds of care? Which ones are the most likely to experience various consequences associated with family caregiving? This article compares the different types of family caregivers, based on the relationship with their main recipient.

    Release date: 2013-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201300111780
    Description:

    This Juristat article profiles cases enrolled with a Maintenance Enforcement Program (MEP) and examines changes in the payment patterns of child and spousal support over time. It focuses on payors with ongoing monthly support obligations in order to examine changes in the proportion of payors making a monthly support payment during the first years of enrolment in a MEP, changes in enforcement activity, and changes in payors' patterns of payment regularity over time. The analysis draws on information from the Survey of Maintenance Enforcement Programs.

    Release date: 2013-04-24

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200211697
    Description:

    Many parents take time off work to care for a child after birth or adoption. Whether or not parents take leave and the duration of that leave may be influenced by characteristics such as parental employment or child and maternal health factors.

    This article examines children's experiences of parent-reported leave after their birth or adoption. In addition, associations between leave and parent employment and child and maternal health factors are analyzed using data from the 2010 Survey of Young Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201200111628
    Description:

    Using data available from the Survey of Maintenance Enforcement Programs, the article profiles a particularly challenging aspect of maintenance enforcement, interjurisdictional support order (ISO) cases of child and spousal support within nine provinces and territories: Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. The article gives a general overview of maintenance enforcement cases, followed by a detailed analysis of ISO cases, and concludes with a look at international ISO cases.

    Release date: 2012-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713167
    Description:

    The division of labour between men and women continues to evolve. Today's couples have a much more equal partnership in sharing financial, child care and household responsibilities. This has been brought about in large part by the expanding economic role of women, which has helped erode the idea that men should be primarily responsible for paid work while women look after unpaid household and family duties.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060089290
    Description:

    As women have entered the labour force in greater numbers, gender differences in the division of labour within families have diminished, with men assuming more housework and child care. Changing work arrangements at home are also leading employers to adapt alternative work arrangements.

    Release date: 2006-08-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006284
    Description:

    The present review provides a description of various Canadian national survey data sets that could be used to examine issues related to child care use. National data sets dealing with patterns of employment, time use, family earnings, social support, and child, adolescent, or adult health measures were included. We conclude that numerous questions remain unanswered in terms of addressing the relationship between patterns of employment, use of child care, family roles and responsibilities, and associations with the health of families. Recommendations are made about information that has not been collected but may prove to be useful in addressing these issues. Moreover, we conclude that existing Canadian national survey data could be used to address several issues related to patterns of care use as well as the impact on children and families.

    Release date: 2006-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2006003
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to profile child care in Canada by focussing on the child care experiences of children aged 6 months to 5 years. The report covers the eight-year period from 1994/95 to 2002/03. Many aspects of child care are discussed including types of care arrangements, hours spent in care, characteristics of and changes in care arrangements, and the use of multiple arrangements. These aspects are compared over time, as are the child care experiences of children from various backgrounds. In addition, patterns in types of care arrangements as children age are discussed.

    Release date: 2006-04-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017033
    Description:

    Delayed marriage, postponement of children, and adults with increasingly long-lived parents have given rise to the 'sandwich generation'. These are individuals caught between the often conflicting demands of caring for children and caring for seniors. Although still relatively small (712,000 in 2002), the ranks of the sandwich generation are likely to grow.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036702
    Description:

    Although generally considered a happy event, the birth of a baby brings with it significant stresses. The transition period of adjusting to the demands of a new lifestyle is often made smoother when parents are able to take some time off work and stay at home with their newborn. Over the years, the Canadian government has extended parental leave several times to allow mothers and fathers more time with their children. This article examines whether parents now remain at home longer with their infants, as well as the socio-demographic factors that influence the length of leave time taken.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036704
    Description:

    This article examines the potential pool of healthcare practitioners who use French at work, as well as those who do not regularly use French in the workplace but who have knowledge of that language, and compares it with the French-speaking population.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-594-X
    Description:

    This paper uses three cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine whether parental labour market participation and the use of substitute child-care influence the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school. The analysis in this paper is based on the arguments that parent-child interaction fosters the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school successfully, and that full-time participation in the work force by lone parents (in one-parent families) and by both parents (in dual-parent families) often results in comparatively less time for parent-child interaction than in families with a stay-at-home parent. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine whether reductions in parental time spent with children as a result of work outside the home impact the intellectual development of young children.

    The study indicates that parental participation in the labour market has little effect on the school readiness scores of most pre-school-aged children. However, children's school readiness does appear to be influenced by parental labour market participation if the parents exhibit above-average parenting skills and levels of parental education. Children of mothers who display above-average parenting skills and higher levels of education tend to benefit slightly when their mothers do not work outside the home. Likewise, children of fathers with above-average education exhibit slightly higher cognitive outcomes if their fathers work part time.

    Although the author finds that there is no association between the number of hours that children spend in child care and their level of school readiness, the study does observe that among pre-school children in substitute child-care, those who come from higher-income families tend to score higher on the school readiness tests than do children from lower-income families. This finding may be attributed to the possibility that children in higher-income families are exposed to a higher quality of substitute child-care, or it may be attributed simply to the advantages of growing up in a family with greater resources.

    Release date: 2003-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026622
    Description:

    This study examines the time volunteers, friends or relatives devote to unpaid informal care.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2002040
    Description:

    The childcare services industry in Canada is unique in that it is entrusted with a precious resource: close to 1.4 million children. Childcare providers assist with the daunting tasks of promoting child development, ensuring children's safety and well-being, and maintaining responsive relationships with individual children.

    This paper examines the childcare services industry in Canada and is divided into three basic parts. First, the article studies the demand for childcare services, including the $3.5 billion spent by households for these services. The financial characteristics of the industry and the roles played by the non-profit sector and government fee-subsidy and grant programs are examined next. And the final section looks at some of the characteristics of the childcare workforce.

    Release date: 2002-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20010046180
    Description:

    This article examines the childcare services industry in Canada and is divided into three basic parts. First it looks at demand for childcare services, including the .5 billion spent by households for these services. Examined next are financial characteristics of the industry and the roles played by the non-profit sector and government fee subsidy and grant programs. The final section looks at some characteristics of the childcare workforce.

    Release date: 2002-04-26

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0117X
    Description:

    This report outlines some initial results from the School Component of the first and second cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). It examines the longitudinal influence of Early Childhood Care and Education and literacy activities on young children's future academic and cognitive outcomes. This overview highlights the information newly available from this component of the survey; it is not comprehensive in its coverage or its analysis. Indeed, the information collected by the NLSCY is so rich and detailed that researchers and analysts will be using it to address a variety of important questions concerning the education of children and youth in Canada for many years to come. Here then, we are merely scratching the surface to stimulate awareness of this rich new data source, and to illustrate the kinds of analyses it makes possible.

    Release date: 1999-10-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980023924
    Description:

    This article looks at those who receive help because of a temporarily difficult time

    Release date: 1998-09-15

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-530-X
    Description:

    This document focuses on parents' perceptions of the availability of family-supportive workplace arrangements; their experiences in balancing paid work and family commitments; and their preferences for changes in the workplace that could help them harmonize work and family life.

    Release date: 1993-12-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-527-X
    Description:

    The report provides in-depth information about child care arrangements; it is based on a nationally representative sample of families with children less than 13 years of age.

    Release date: 1993-03-29

Reference (5)

Reference (5) (5 of 5 results)

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