Statistics by subject – Violence among children and youth

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All (58)

All (58) (25 of 58 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-02-16

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201300111805
    Description:

    This Juristat article profiles intimate partner violence (including both spousal and dating violence partners), family violence against children, and family violence against seniors. The special focus this year is family-related murder-suicides, which highlights trends, risk factors, underlying motives, and characteristics of the victims and accused. This annual article is designed to help monitor changes in family violence over time and identify emerging issues.

    Release date: 2013-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201200111643
    Description:

    The annual publication is designed to help monitor changes in family violence over time and identify emerging issues. The special focus of this year's report is a comparative analysis of family violence incidents and other forms of violent crime. This analysis will help broaden the current understanding of the factors that make violence within the family a unique type of victimization.

    Release date: 2012-05-22

  • Table: 85-224-X
    Description:

    This is the thirteenth annual Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile report produced by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics under the Federal Family Violence Initiative. This annual report provides the most current data on the nature and extent of family violence in Canada, as well as trends over time, as part of the ongoing initiative to inform policy makers and the public about family violence issues. Each year the report has a different focus. This year, the focus of the report is on self-reported incidents of spousal victimization from the 2009 General Social Survey on Victimization. In addition, using police-reported data, the report also presents information on family violence against children and youth, family violence against seniors, and family-related homicides. The Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile will now be produced as an article in Juristat, catalogue no. 85-002-X , as such the old product number (85-224-X) associated with the report is now terminated.

    Release date: 2011-01-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0033M
    Description:

    This series of profiles provides analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning victimization, offending and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. The profiles primarily draw on results from the General Social Survey on victimization. Where applicable, they also incorporate information from other data sources, such as the Census of the Population and the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey.

    Examples of the topics explored through this series include: Victimization and offending in Canada's territories, Canadians use of crime prevention measures and victimization of older Canadians. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 2010-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800310566
    Description:

    This report analyzes police-reported data on crimes committed by youth aged 12 to 17 in Canada in 2006. An examination of trends in youth crime since the 1991 peak as well as more recent trends with particular reference to the period following the implementation of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) in 2003 is also presented.

    The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, 'other' Criminal Code offences and drug-related offences. Changes in the use of formal charges versus alternate means to handle youth accused of a crime following the introduction of the YCJA are also examined. Other topics discussed include youth crimes occurring at school, the presence of weapons in youth crime, and changes to youth court caseloads and youth correctional services after the implementation of the YCJA. Data from the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) are presented within the context of both short and long term trends and at the national, provincial and territorial levels. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of youth crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-05-16

  • Table: 85-227-X
    Description:

    This report presents indicators to measure the workload and performance of the criminal justice system, as well as indictors on a number of socio-demographic and economic factors that can be associated with crime and victimization. In this report, workload and volume measures centre on the work of the police, courts, corrections, diversion programs and victim services and changes over time. Examples of workload and volume indicators examined in this report include: the number of criminal incidents known to police; the number of people serviced by alternative measures, mediation, dispute resolution and diversion programs; the number of cases dealt with in court; average counts in corrections institutions, and; the number of persons assisted by victim service agencies. Performance indicators are organized according to the following five general goals of the criminal justice system: 1) Public order, safety and national security through prevention and intervention; 2) Offender accountability, reintegration and rehabilitation; 3) Public trust, confidence and respect for the justice system; 4) Social equity and access to the justice system for all citizens, and; 5) Victim needs served. Examples of performance indicators examined in this report are: the overall cost of administering the sectors of the criminal justice system; the type and length of sentences ordered in court; public satisfaction with the police, the courts, and the correctional and parole systems; the number of applications for legal aid, and; the number of services for victims of crime. The various socio-demographic and economic indicators included in this report are presented in order to present statistical information on the factors that can be associated with crime. These 'context of crime indicators are organized into three broad categories: Community and society, Family, and Individual. Examples of such indicators examined in this report are: the age and sex distributions of the population; income levels and labour force participation; levels of social engagement; levels of gang activity; family structures; levels of child support; levels of education; the rate of literacy, and; the rate of alcohol and drug abuse among the adult and youth population.

    Release date: 2005-12-20

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008646
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey, the following chapter examines the different circumstances and characteristics of family-related homicides in Canada which occurred. The analysis includes details about spousal homicides, child and youth homicides and family homicides of older persons (65+). This chapter will present data on the characteristics of the accused, the incident and the victim in these homicides.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008648
    Description:

    This chapter will focus on the physical and sexual assaults against children and youth (under the age of 18) that were reported to police services. In addition, other forms of child maltreatment and child abuse are presented including the extent to which children and youth witness violence in the home. System responses to the issue of child maltreatment and violence will be examined, using information from the Transition Home and Victim Services Surveys. As well, recent policy developments to address and improve the situation of family violence against children and youth in Canada will be highlighted.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050037946
    Description:

    This Juristat presents a profile of all shelters in Canada that provided residential services to abused women and their children in 2003-2004. Additionally, through the use of a snapshot day survey (April 14, 2004), selected characteristics of residents (i.e., reasons for coming to the shelter, age group, parenting responsibilities, relationship to abuser, involvement of the criminal justice system, etc.) are presented. Data for this Juristat come primarily from the Transition Home Survey (THS), a biennial census of all residential facilities for female victims of domestic violence conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative. Questionnaires are mailed to all shelters known to provide residential services to abused women in every province and territory. Information is collected on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during the previous 12 months (April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004). Cross-sectional comparisons and comparisons using time-series data from the THS Trend File are also included. The THS Trend File contains only those facilities that participated in the survey in each of the following years: 1997/98, 1999/00, 2001/02 and 2003/04.

    Release date: 2005-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050018064
    Description:

    This issue of Juristat presents statistical information on the extent and nature of violent victimization of children and youth in Canada in 2003 as reported to a subset of police services. Rates of victimization are presented for each age and sex. Data describes the different types of assaults perpetrated against children and youth, the weapons used to inflict injury, the injuries sustained and the location and time of the assault relative to various age groups. Other topics included in the report are child pornography, sexual exploitation of children, kidnapping and abduction of children. Data used in this report include police statistics from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey and court data from the Adult Criminal Court Survey.

    Release date: 2005-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040118410
    Description:

    This report, based on data from the 2002/03 Victim Services Survey, provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada and the clients they served. Data are presented on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, criminal injuries compensation applications and awards, and client characteristics such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization.

    The report also contains some information on transition homes and shelters for abused women and their children that was collected by Statistics Canada's 2001/2002 Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2004-12-09

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006983
    Description:

    The definition of child abuse varies among researchers, criminal justice, health and social service professionals. As an example, child abuse is defined differently for criminal law and child protection purposes and, moreover, definitions in the child protection context vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006986
    Description:

    Until recently, charging and prosecution policies emphasized the need to treat family violence 'like any other crime.' These policies translated into significant challenges for police and prosecutors who became aware of the unique characteristics of family violence such as the sharing of a home and the emotional and financial relationships between the victim and the offender.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016876
    Description:

    Profiling children who witnessed violence at home, this article assesses concurrent and longer-term impacts on their levels of aggression and anxiety, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20030048418
    Description:

    This report provides the most recent information from the 2001/02 Transition Home Survey. It surveys facilities providing residential services for abused women conducted every two years. Questionnaires are mailed to every known facility identified as providing residential services (shelter) to abused women in each province and territory. Information is collected on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during the previous 12 months. The survey also provides a one-day snapshot of the characteristics of women and children residing in shelters on a specific day. For the 2001/02 survey, the snapshot day was April 15, 2002. In 2001/02, some 92% of shelters responded to the survey. Where possible, comparisons are made with the 1997/98 and 1999/00 Transition Home surveys.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006543
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on physical and sexual assaults and homicides committed against children and youth (under the age of 18) and reported to police forces across the country. In addition, system responses to the problem of child maltreatment are examined.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2003002
    Description:

    This research paper explores the effect of witnessing violence in the home on aggressive behaviour among children, controlling for other important influences such as parenting practices, community and social support available to the parent and child, child emotional problems, and other socio-demographic factors.

    Release date: 2003-06-19

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006457
    Description:

    Over the past two decades, the negative consequences of child maltreatment have been extensively studied. Sexual and physical assault, emotional abuse and neglect can have a tremendous impact on the lives of victims and lead to physical health complications, long-term mental health issues, and problems with relationships or social functioning (Latimer 1998). Increasingly, exposure to spousal violence is being recognized as harmful and as putting children at risk for long-term negative effects.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015808
    Description:

    Using the results of the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, this chapter examines the characteristics of those who are at greatest risk of violent victimization and the environment in which these incidents occur.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010068392
    Description:

    This Juristat presents estimates of the number of children in Canada who have witnessed violence in their homes in recent years, and compares the characteristics of these children and their families to children who have not witnessed violence. This analysis also examines links between witnessing violence and behavioural outcomes among children.Estimates of the extent of family violence witnessed by children in Canada are available through three national surveys conducted by Statistics Canada: the 1999 General Social Survey on Victimization, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. The GSS and the VAWS are victimization surveys that ask a random sample of adults (men and women in the case of the GSS and women only in the case of the VAWS) about their experiences of spousal violence and whether their children witnessed the violence. In the NLSCY, a random sample of children are selected and the person most knowledgeable about the child responds to a wide range of questions about the child and the household, including whether the child sees adults or teenagers in the home physically fighting, hitting or otherwise trying to hurt others.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006461
    Description:

    The reactions of children who witness violence by one parent against the other can include emotional, social, cognitive, physical and behavioural maladjustment problems (Jaffe, Wolfe and Wilson 1990). These children tend to show lower levels of social competence; higher rates of depression, worry and frustration; and are more likely than other children to develop stress-related disorders and to show lower levels of empathy (Fantuzzo, et al. 1991; Graham-Bermann and Levendosky 1998; Moore and Pepler 1998; Edleson 1999b).

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006460
    Description:

    Children and youth are most likely to be killed by family members. Of the 1,990 solved homicides of children and youth recorded by police in Canada between 1974 and 1999, family members were responsible for 63% of the deaths. The remaining solved homicides committed against children and youth were carried out by acquaintances and strangers (27% and 10%, respectively). In contrast, 50% of adults were killed by acquaintances, followed by family members (34%) and strangers (16%). Between 1974 and 1999, the annual rate of homicides of children and youth fluctuated from year to year, ranging from a high of 14 per million in 1981 to the previous low of 8 per million in 1993.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

Data (36)

Data (36) (25 of 36 results)

  • Table: 85-224-X
    Description:

    This is the thirteenth annual Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile report produced by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics under the Federal Family Violence Initiative. This annual report provides the most current data on the nature and extent of family violence in Canada, as well as trends over time, as part of the ongoing initiative to inform policy makers and the public about family violence issues. Each year the report has a different focus. This year, the focus of the report is on self-reported incidents of spousal victimization from the 2009 General Social Survey on Victimization. In addition, using police-reported data, the report also presents information on family violence against children and youth, family violence against seniors, and family-related homicides. The Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile will now be produced as an article in Juristat, catalogue no. 85-002-X , as such the old product number (85-224-X) associated with the report is now terminated.

    Release date: 2011-01-27

  • Table: 85-227-X
    Description:

    This report presents indicators to measure the workload and performance of the criminal justice system, as well as indictors on a number of socio-demographic and economic factors that can be associated with crime and victimization. In this report, workload and volume measures centre on the work of the police, courts, corrections, diversion programs and victim services and changes over time. Examples of workload and volume indicators examined in this report include: the number of criminal incidents known to police; the number of people serviced by alternative measures, mediation, dispute resolution and diversion programs; the number of cases dealt with in court; average counts in corrections institutions, and; the number of persons assisted by victim service agencies. Performance indicators are organized according to the following five general goals of the criminal justice system: 1) Public order, safety and national security through prevention and intervention; 2) Offender accountability, reintegration and rehabilitation; 3) Public trust, confidence and respect for the justice system; 4) Social equity and access to the justice system for all citizens, and; 5) Victim needs served. Examples of performance indicators examined in this report are: the overall cost of administering the sectors of the criminal justice system; the type and length of sentences ordered in court; public satisfaction with the police, the courts, and the correctional and parole systems; the number of applications for legal aid, and; the number of services for victims of crime. The various socio-demographic and economic indicators included in this report are presented in order to present statistical information on the factors that can be associated with crime. These 'context of crime indicators are organized into three broad categories: Community and society, Family, and Individual. Examples of such indicators examined in this report are: the age and sex distributions of the population; income levels and labour force participation; levels of social engagement; levels of gang activity; family structures; levels of child support; levels of education; the rate of literacy, and; the rate of alcohol and drug abuse among the adult and youth population.

    Release date: 2005-12-20

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008646
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey, the following chapter examines the different circumstances and characteristics of family-related homicides in Canada which occurred. The analysis includes details about spousal homicides, child and youth homicides and family homicides of older persons (65+). This chapter will present data on the characteristics of the accused, the incident and the victim in these homicides.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008648
    Description:

    This chapter will focus on the physical and sexual assaults against children and youth (under the age of 18) that were reported to police services. In addition, other forms of child maltreatment and child abuse are presented including the extent to which children and youth witness violence in the home. System responses to the issue of child maltreatment and violence will be examined, using information from the Transition Home and Victim Services Surveys. As well, recent policy developments to address and improve the situation of family violence against children and youth in Canada will be highlighted.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006983
    Description:

    The definition of child abuse varies among researchers, criminal justice, health and social service professionals. As an example, child abuse is defined differently for criminal law and child protection purposes and, moreover, definitions in the child protection context vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006986
    Description:

    Until recently, charging and prosecution policies emphasized the need to treat family violence 'like any other crime.' These policies translated into significant challenges for police and prosecutors who became aware of the unique characteristics of family violence such as the sharing of a home and the emotional and financial relationships between the victim and the offender.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006543
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on physical and sexual assaults and homicides committed against children and youth (under the age of 18) and reported to police forces across the country. In addition, system responses to the problem of child maltreatment are examined.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006457
    Description:

    Over the past two decades, the negative consequences of child maltreatment have been extensively studied. Sexual and physical assault, emotional abuse and neglect can have a tremendous impact on the lives of victims and lead to physical health complications, long-term mental health issues, and problems with relationships or social functioning (Latimer 1998). Increasingly, exposure to spousal violence is being recognized as harmful and as putting children at risk for long-term negative effects.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006461
    Description:

    The reactions of children who witness violence by one parent against the other can include emotional, social, cognitive, physical and behavioural maladjustment problems (Jaffe, Wolfe and Wilson 1990). These children tend to show lower levels of social competence; higher rates of depression, worry and frustration; and are more likely than other children to develop stress-related disorders and to show lower levels of empathy (Fantuzzo, et al. 1991; Graham-Bermann and Levendosky 1998; Moore and Pepler 1998; Edleson 1999b).

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006460
    Description:

    Children and youth are most likely to be killed by family members. Of the 1,990 solved homicides of children and youth recorded by police in Canada between 1974 and 1999, family members were responsible for 63% of the deaths. The remaining solved homicides committed against children and youth were carried out by acquaintances and strangers (27% and 10%, respectively). In contrast, 50% of adults were killed by acquaintances, followed by family members (34%) and strangers (16%). Between 1974 and 1999, the annual rate of homicides of children and youth fluctuated from year to year, ranging from a high of 14 per million in 1981 to the previous low of 8 per million in 1993.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006463
    Description:

    One measure taken to assist abused women and their children leaving violent situations has been the development of an ample system of shelters. Shelters offer abused women and their children a temporary and safe place to live. Currently, shelters exist in every province and territory and they provide services to children and female victims of various types of abuse.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006459
    Description:

    The Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS) is the first national study on the incidence of child abuse and neglect reported to, and investigated by, child welfare services in Canada. Prior to this study, available data had been largely limited to police-reported incidents of assault and homicide. However, because of the secrecy that often surrounds cases of child abuse, many cases never come to the attention of the police.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005261
    Description:

    Manitoba was the first jurisdiction in Canada to develop a specialized criminal justice system response for family violence cases.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005257
    Description:

    Mistreatment of children and youth is a complex issue that can have devastating consequences and not only the children and youth involved, but on society in general. However, there is no single source for national data on the nature and extent of child mistreatment in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005333
    Description:

    This section highlights innovative court responses to the problem of family violence in the two provinces which currently have specialized courts to deal with family violence cases; Manitoba and Ontario.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005311
    Description:

    Physical and sexual assaults are among the most pervasive causes of harm and death to children and youth, yet the most difficult to document. Assaults by family members account for a substantial portion of all assaults against children and youth.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19980005281
    Description:

    In 1996, 21, 901 cases of spousal assault were recorded in a sample of 154 police departments across the country. The proportion of male victims of spousal assault was relatively small (11%) compared to female victims (89%).

    Release date: 1998-05-28

  • Table: 85-224-X19980005286
    Description:

    Child abuse and neglect often result in physical, emotional and developmental problems which can affect victims throughout their lifetime.However counting cases of child abuse is fraught with many difficulties.

    Release date: 1998-05-28

  • Table: 89-541-X
    Description:

    This publication presents the results of a number of activities and projects undertaken by Statistics Canada to identify the nature and extent of family violence in Canada. It is divided into four chapters: the first chapter presents the prevalence of wife assault and spousal homicide; the second addresses child abuse; the third focuses on the abuse of seniors; and the final chapter reports on criminal justice processing of family violence cases.

    Information on these areas is derived from various national studies, including: a national survey on violence against women; a national survey on transition homes; a survey to examine cases of child abuse reported to pediatric hospitals; a descriptive study of legislation and services provided by provincial child welfare systems; and police reported data on cases of family violence and domestic homicides. Tables, graphs and analysis present the nature and extent of family violence according to the results of the various studies. Also included are brief descriptions of the methodology of each of these studies.

    Release date: 1994-07-20

Analysis (21)

Analysis (21) (21 of 21 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-02-16

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201300111805
    Description:

    This Juristat article profiles intimate partner violence (including both spousal and dating violence partners), family violence against children, and family violence against seniors. The special focus this year is family-related murder-suicides, which highlights trends, risk factors, underlying motives, and characteristics of the victims and accused. This annual article is designed to help monitor changes in family violence over time and identify emerging issues.

    Release date: 2013-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201200111643
    Description:

    The annual publication is designed to help monitor changes in family violence over time and identify emerging issues. The special focus of this year's report is a comparative analysis of family violence incidents and other forms of violent crime. This analysis will help broaden the current understanding of the factors that make violence within the family a unique type of victimization.

    Release date: 2012-05-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0033M
    Description:

    This series of profiles provides analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning victimization, offending and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. The profiles primarily draw on results from the General Social Survey on victimization. Where applicable, they also incorporate information from other data sources, such as the Census of the Population and the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey.

    Examples of the topics explored through this series include: Victimization and offending in Canada's territories, Canadians use of crime prevention measures and victimization of older Canadians. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 2010-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800310566
    Description:

    This report analyzes police-reported data on crimes committed by youth aged 12 to 17 in Canada in 2006. An examination of trends in youth crime since the 1991 peak as well as more recent trends with particular reference to the period following the implementation of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) in 2003 is also presented.

    The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, 'other' Criminal Code offences and drug-related offences. Changes in the use of formal charges versus alternate means to handle youth accused of a crime following the introduction of the YCJA are also examined. Other topics discussed include youth crimes occurring at school, the presence of weapons in youth crime, and changes to youth court caseloads and youth correctional services after the implementation of the YCJA. Data from the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) are presented within the context of both short and long term trends and at the national, provincial and territorial levels. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of youth crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-05-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050037946
    Description:

    This Juristat presents a profile of all shelters in Canada that provided residential services to abused women and their children in 2003-2004. Additionally, through the use of a snapshot day survey (April 14, 2004), selected characteristics of residents (i.e., reasons for coming to the shelter, age group, parenting responsibilities, relationship to abuser, involvement of the criminal justice system, etc.) are presented. Data for this Juristat come primarily from the Transition Home Survey (THS), a biennial census of all residential facilities for female victims of domestic violence conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative. Questionnaires are mailed to all shelters known to provide residential services to abused women in every province and territory. Information is collected on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during the previous 12 months (April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004). Cross-sectional comparisons and comparisons using time-series data from the THS Trend File are also included. The THS Trend File contains only those facilities that participated in the survey in each of the following years: 1997/98, 1999/00, 2001/02 and 2003/04.

    Release date: 2005-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050018064
    Description:

    This issue of Juristat presents statistical information on the extent and nature of violent victimization of children and youth in Canada in 2003 as reported to a subset of police services. Rates of victimization are presented for each age and sex. Data describes the different types of assaults perpetrated against children and youth, the weapons used to inflict injury, the injuries sustained and the location and time of the assault relative to various age groups. Other topics included in the report are child pornography, sexual exploitation of children, kidnapping and abduction of children. Data used in this report include police statistics from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey and court data from the Adult Criminal Court Survey.

    Release date: 2005-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040118410
    Description:

    This report, based on data from the 2002/03 Victim Services Survey, provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada and the clients they served. Data are presented on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, criminal injuries compensation applications and awards, and client characteristics such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization.

    The report also contains some information on transition homes and shelters for abused women and their children that was collected by Statistics Canada's 2001/2002 Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2004-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016876
    Description:

    Profiling children who witnessed violence at home, this article assesses concurrent and longer-term impacts on their levels of aggression and anxiety, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20030048418
    Description:

    This report provides the most recent information from the 2001/02 Transition Home Survey. It surveys facilities providing residential services for abused women conducted every two years. Questionnaires are mailed to every known facility identified as providing residential services (shelter) to abused women in each province and territory. Information is collected on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during the previous 12 months. The survey also provides a one-day snapshot of the characteristics of women and children residing in shelters on a specific day. For the 2001/02 survey, the snapshot day was April 15, 2002. In 2001/02, some 92% of shelters responded to the survey. Where possible, comparisons are made with the 1997/98 and 1999/00 Transition Home surveys.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2003002
    Description:

    This research paper explores the effect of witnessing violence in the home on aggressive behaviour among children, controlling for other important influences such as parenting practices, community and social support available to the parent and child, child emotional problems, and other socio-demographic factors.

    Release date: 2003-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015808
    Description:

    Using the results of the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, this chapter examines the characteristics of those who are at greatest risk of violent victimization and the environment in which these incidents occur.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010068392
    Description:

    This Juristat presents estimates of the number of children in Canada who have witnessed violence in their homes in recent years, and compares the characteristics of these children and their families to children who have not witnessed violence. This analysis also examines links between witnessing violence and behavioural outcomes among children.Estimates of the extent of family violence witnessed by children in Canada are available through three national surveys conducted by Statistics Canada: the 1999 General Social Survey on Victimization, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. The GSS and the VAWS are victimization surveys that ask a random sample of adults (men and women in the case of the GSS and women only in the case of the VAWS) about their experiences of spousal violence and whether their children witnessed the violence. In the NLSCY, a random sample of children are selected and the person most knowledgeable about the child responds to a wide range of questions about the child and the household, including whether the child sees adults or teenagers in the home physically fighting, hitting or otherwise trying to hurt others.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001005
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of children and youth in Canada as victims and offenders in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010048390
    Description:

    Using data from the 1994/95 and 1996/97 National Longitudinal Survey on Children and Youth, this Juristat examines problem behaviour and delinquency as reported by a representative sample of youths between 10 and 13 years of age. Specifically four different issues are explored. First, the demographic variation in delinquency is assessed. Second, to understand life-course trajectories of children and youth involved in aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property, stability in delinquency is examined. Third, to understand why young people commit offences, it is important to differentiate aggressive behaviour from other types of delinquency. Therefore, the relationship between aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property is examined. Finally, the most common risk factors in childhood and early adolescence are presented.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010018387
    Description:

    This report provides the most recent information from the 1999-2000 Transition Home Survey. It is a census survey of facilities providing residential services for abused women conducted every 2 years. Questionnaires are mailed to every known facility identified as providing residential services (shelter) to abused women in each province and territory. Information is collected on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during the previous 12 months. The survey also provides a one-day snapshot of the characteristics of women and children residing in shelters on a specific day. For the 1999-2000 survey, the snapshot day was April 17, 2000. In 1999-2000, 92% of shelters responded to the survey. Where possible, comparisons are made with the 1997-1998 Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2001-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990138307
    Description:

    This report measures the scope of violent crime by female and male youths at the national and provincial levels and in selected metropolitan areas, determines the degree of change observed between 1988 and 1998, identifies the characteristics of violent crime by youths and compares it to that of adults, and creates a portrait of violent young offenders (male and female) and their victims. To this end, police-reported data from the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey have been used.

    Release date: 1999-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034785
    Description:

    This article examines the family circumstances of 8- to 11-year-old youngsters to assess the link between behaviour and certain family characteristics.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19980028260
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on the major areas of the criminal justice system (police, courts, legal aid, prosecutions and correctional services), as well as on a variety of current topics and issues related to justice in Canada.

    Release date: 1998-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19970118230
    Description:

    The abuse of children and youth in the family is a serious concern for Canadians. Child abuse and neglect often result in physical, emotional and developmental problems which can affect the victims throughout their lives. There are currently no national estimates of child abuse in Canada. Only those incidents that come to the attention of officials, such as the police and child welfare agencies, are known. Efforts to understand the nature and the scope of child abuse should therefore take into account the fact that available data reflect only a portion of the total. This Juristat uses statistical databases of police reported incidents across Canada to describe what is currently known from a criminal justice perspective about violence against children and youth in the family. Although these police reported incidents account for only a portion of all abuse that occurs, they nonetheless provide an important tool for profiling the more serious cases. For the purposes of this analysis, "children" include all young persons under 18 years of age, and "family members" include persons related to the victim by kniship, either through blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, as well as legal guardians such as foster parents.

    Release date: 1997-11-06

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