Statistics by subject – Children and youth

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  • Table: 85-227-X
    Description:

    This report presents indicators to measure the workload and performance of the criminal justice system, as well as indictors on a number of socio-demographic and economic factors that can be associated with crime and victimization. In this report, workload and volume measures centre on the work of the police, courts, corrections, diversion programs and victim services and changes over time. Examples of workload and volume indicators examined in this report include: the number of criminal incidents known to police; the number of people serviced by alternative measures, mediation, dispute resolution and diversion programs; the number of cases dealt with in court; average counts in corrections institutions, and; the number of persons assisted by victim service agencies. Performance indicators are organized according to the following five general goals of the criminal justice system: 1) Public order, safety and national security through prevention and intervention; 2) Offender accountability, reintegration and rehabilitation; 3) Public trust, confidence and respect for the justice system; 4) Social equity and access to the justice system for all citizens, and; 5) Victim needs served. Examples of performance indicators examined in this report are: the overall cost of administering the sectors of the criminal justice system; the type and length of sentences ordered in court; public satisfaction with the police, the courts, and the correctional and parole systems; the number of applications for legal aid, and; the number of services for victims of crime. The various socio-demographic and economic indicators included in this report are presented in order to present statistical information on the factors that can be associated with crime. These 'context of crime indicators are organized into three broad categories: Community and society, Family, and Individual. Examples of such indicators examined in this report are: the age and sex distributions of the population; income levels and labour force participation; levels of social engagement; levels of gang activity; family structures; levels of child support; levels of education; the rate of literacy, and; the rate of alcohol and drug abuse among the adult and youth population.

    Release date: 2005-12-20

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008646
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey, the following chapter examines the different circumstances and characteristics of family-related homicides in Canada which occurred. The analysis includes details about spousal homicides, child and youth homicides and family homicides of older persons (65+). This chapter will present data on the characteristics of the accused, the incident and the victim in these homicides.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008648
    Description:

    This chapter will focus on the physical and sexual assaults against children and youth (under the age of 18) that were reported to police services. In addition, other forms of child maltreatment and child abuse are presented including the extent to which children and youth witness violence in the home. System responses to the issue of child maltreatment and violence will be examined, using information from the Transition Home and Victim Services Surveys. As well, recent policy developments to address and improve the situation of family violence against children and youth in Canada will be highlighted.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Public use microdata: 82M0011X
    Description:

    The main objective of the 2002 Youth Smoking Survey (YSS) is to provide current information on the smoking behaviour of students in grades 5 to 9 (in Quebec primary school grades 5 and 6 and secondary school grades 1 to 3), and to measure changes that occurred since the last time the survey was conducted in 1994. Additionally, the 2002 survey collected basic data on alcohol and drug use by students in grades 7 to 9 (in Quebec secondary 1 to 3). Results of the Youth Smoking Survey will help with the evaluation of anti-smoking and anti-drug use programs, as well as with the development of new programs.

    Release date: 2004-07-14

  • Table: 89-597-X
    Description:

    This article presents information on health, education and language for Métis, Inuit and North American Indian children living in non-reserve areas. It uses the 'children and youth' component of the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS).

    Release date: 2004-07-09

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006983
    Description:

    The definition of child abuse varies among researchers, criminal justice, health and social service professionals. As an example, child abuse is defined differently for criminal law and child protection purposes and, moreover, definitions in the child protection context vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006985
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey, this chapter examines the prevalence of and trends in family homicide .It also explores the circumstances surrounding homicides, and the demographic characteristics of accused persons and victims. Finally, information on the aftermath of family homicide will be presented by examining what happened to the accused following the homicide.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006986
    Description:

    Until recently, charging and prosecution policies emphasized the need to treat family violence 'like any other crime.' These policies translated into significant challenges for police and prosecutors who became aware of the unique characteristics of family violence such as the sharing of a home and the emotional and financial relationships between the victim and the offender.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 89-577-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities may be limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS Survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private and some collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data was collected after the 2001 Census, in the fall of 2001.

    This paper presents initial results on the number of persons with disabilities, disability rates as well as the type and severity of disability, by age and sex, for Canada and the provinces.

    Release date: 2003-12-19

  • Table: 89-586-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered " Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories or Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    These tables contain PALS data on children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to help; formal and informal-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and household income.

    Tables are presented by severity of disability of children with disabilities, for Canada and provinces.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006543
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on physical and sexual assaults and homicides committed against children and youth (under the age of 18) and reported to police forces across the country. In addition, system responses to the problem of child maltreatment are examined.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Table: 89-579-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private and some collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, in the fall of 2001.

    These tables contain data on the number of adults and children with disabilities, disability rates, as well as the type and severity of disability, by age and sex, for Canada and the provinces.

    Release date: 2002-12-03

  • Table: 89-511-X
    Description:

    For youths, the ages 15 to 19 are a transition period. Most still live at home and a growing percentage are enrolled in academic institutions. At the same time, however, they are beginning to experience problems and characteristics usually associated with adult life. Many, for example, have begun to leave home; others are entering the labour market for the first time. Youths have the highest unemployment rate of any age group in the country. In addition, those who head families or live alone have very low incomes. These characteristics and others - demographic, family status, education, labour force characteristics, income, health, time-use patterns, criminal activity and victimization - are described in this report, which has drawn upon many sources.

    Release date: 2002-10-30

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006457
    Description:

    Over the past two decades, the negative consequences of child maltreatment have been extensively studied. Sexual and physical assault, emotional abuse and neglect can have a tremendous impact on the lives of victims and lead to physical health complications, long-term mental health issues, and problems with relationships or social functioning (Latimer 1998). Increasingly, exposure to spousal violence is being recognized as harmful and as putting children at risk for long-term negative effects.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006463
    Description:

    One measure taken to assist abused women and their children leaving violent situations has been the development of an ample system of shelters. Shelters offer abused women and their children a temporary and safe place to live. Currently, shelters exist in every province and territory and they provide services to children and female victims of various types of abuse.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006459
    Description:

    The Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS) is the first national study on the incidence of child abuse and neglect reported to, and investigated by, child welfare services in Canada. Prior to this study, available data had been largely limited to police-reported incidents of assault and homicide. However, because of the secrecy that often surrounds cases of child abuse, many cases never come to the attention of the police.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006461
    Description:

    The reactions of children who witness violence by one parent against the other can include emotional, social, cognitive, physical and behavioural maladjustment problems (Jaffe, Wolfe and Wilson 1990). These children tend to show lower levels of social competence; higher rates of depression, worry and frustration; and are more likely than other children to develop stress-related disorders and to show lower levels of empathy (Fantuzzo, et al. 1991; Graham-Bermann and Levendosky 1998; Moore and Pepler 1998; Edleson 1999b).

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006460
    Description:

    Children and youth are most likely to be killed by family members. Of the 1,990 solved homicides of children and youth recorded by police in Canada between 1974 and 1999, family members were responsible for 63% of the deaths. The remaining solved homicides committed against children and youth were carried out by acquaintances and strangers (27% and 10%, respectively). In contrast, 50% of adults were killed by acquaintances, followed by family members (34%) and strangers (16%). Between 1974 and 1999, the annual rate of homicides of children and youth fluctuated from year to year, ranging from a high of 14 per million in 1981 to the previous low of 8 per million in 1993.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Public use microdata: 89M0015X
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), developed jointly by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a comprehensive survey which follows the development of children in Canada and paints a picture of their lives. The survey monitors children's development and measures the incidence of various factors that influence their development, both positively and negatively.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005259
    Description:

    From 1979 to 1998, there were 12,767 victims of homicide in Canada. One-third of the victims were killed by family members, another 36% were committed by acquaintances, and 12% by strangers.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005257
    Description:

    Mistreatment of children and youth is a complex issue that can have devastating consequences and not only the children and youth involved, but on society in general. However, there is no single source for national data on the nature and extent of child mistreatment in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005333
    Description:

    This section highlights innovative court responses to the problem of family violence in the two provinces which currently have specialized courts to deal with family violence cases; Manitoba and Ontario.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005261
    Description:

    Manitoba was the first jurisdiction in Canada to develop a specialized criminal justice system response for family violence cases.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

Analysis (389)

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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5052
    Release date: 2018-04-19

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5233
    Release date: 2018-03-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3824
    Release date: 2017-12-19

  • Index and guides: 98-200-X2016015
    Description:

    This Census in Brief article focuses on children with an immigrant background, that is, children aged 0 to 14 who were born abroad or who have at least one foreign-born parent. Children with an immigrant background are examined by country of ancestry (country of birth of the foreign-born children or the foreign-born parents) and by selected household and family characteristics.

    Release date: 2017-10-25

  • Index and guides: 98-200-X2016020
    Description:

    This Census in Brief article describes the diverse family characteristics of Aboriginal children aged 0 to 4, including children living in two-parent families, in lone-parent families, and with grandparents, as well as foster children in private homes. Results are presented for First Nations, Métis and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2017-10-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3312
    Release date: 2017-09-25

  • Index and guides: 98-200-X2016012
    Description:

    This Census in Brief examines children younger than 18 living in low-income households in 2015. It sheds light on the incidence of low income for Canadian children of different ages, across different family circumstances and household living arrangements. It also provides information on child low income at different levels of geography, including provinces, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    Release date: 2017-09-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5185
    Release date: 2017-06-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3313
    Release date: 2017-03-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3323
    Release date: 2017-03-01

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2016002
    Description:

    Statistics Canada currently measures low-income using three low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs), and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). This publication provides a description of the methods used to arrive at each of these thresholds. It also explains how low-income status and various low-income statistics are determined. Tables presenting thresholds and low-income statistics are available on CANSIM.

    Release date: 2016-07-08

  • Index and guides: 92-140-X
    Description:

    Before each Census of Population, Statistics Canada carries out a three- to four-year process to review the content of the census questionnaires in consultation with census data users, performing tests and developing questionnaire content to ensure that it takes into account the evolution of Canadian society. Factors considered in developing the content include legislative requirements regarding information, program and policy requirements; the burden placed on respondents to respond to questions; concerns about privacy; feedback from consultations and tests; data quality; costs and operational considerations; the comparability of data with earlier data and the availability of alternative data sources. Before each census, Statistics Canada tests the questionnaire content through an extensive test. The content report presents the analyses conducted from the data collected from this test and the results that are used to fine tune the questionnaires, the methodology and the systems used for the Census Program.

    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Index and guides: 92-140-X2016001
    Description:

    The 2016 Census Program Content Test was conducted from May 2 to June 30, 2014. The Test was designed to assess the impact of any proposed content changes to the 2016 Census Program and to measure the impact of including a social insurance number (SIN) question on the data quality.

    This quantitative test used a split-panel design involving 55,000 dwellings, divided into 11 panels of 5,000 dwellings each: five panels were dedicated to the Content Test while the remaining six panels were for the SIN Test. Two models of test questionnaires were developed to meet the objectives, namely a model with all the proposed changes EXCEPT the SIN question and a model with all the proposed changes INCLUDING the SIN question. A third model of 'control' questionnaire with the 2011 content was also developed. The population living in a private dwelling in mail-out areas in one of the ten provinces was targeted for the test. Paper and electronic response channels were part of the Test as well.

    This report presents the Test objectives, the design and a summary of the analysis in order to determine potential content for the 2016 Census Program. Results from the data analysis of the Test were not the only elements used to determine the content for 2016. Other elements were also considered, such as response burden, comparison over time and users’ needs.

    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2015002
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Employment and Social Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    This update presents revised LIMs for 2006 to 2011 resulting from the reweighting of SLID data. This reweighting makes it possible to compare results from CIS to earlier years.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2015001
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Employment and Social Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    Release date: 2015-07-08

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2014002
    Description:

    Statistics that depict the movements in the bottom end of the income distribution, such as the proportion of low-income persons exiting low income from one year to the next, provide important information for developing policy on poverty and income inequality. Since the mid 1990s, these statistics have been generated using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). The longitudinal component of the SLID was discontinued in 2010. This paper examines new and alternative time series on low income dynamics that can be created using the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD).

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2014003
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Employment and Social Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    Release date: 2014-12-10

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2013002
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Human Resources and Skill Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    Release date: 2013-06-27

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2012002
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Human Resources and Skill Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    Release date: 2012-06-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5179
    Release date: 2012-04-16

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2012001
    Description:

    This study examines low income in Canada over a 34-year period from 1976 to 2009 with a multi-line, multi-index approach using data from the Survey of Consumer Finance (1976 to 1995) and Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (1996 to 2009). Three different low income lines are used: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs); the Low Income Measure (LIM) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). In addition, three indexes are used to measure the incidence, depth and severity of low income in the study.

    We first examine the evolution of low-income at the national level. This is followed by an investigation of the low income experiences of children, seniors, lone-parents, unattached non-elderly individuals, recent immigrants, off-reserve aboriginals and persons with activity limitations. Next, we compare low incomes across the ten provinces as well as seven Census Metropolitan Areas (CMA). Finally, we study low income mobility in Canada during the 1993-to-2009 period.

    Release date: 2012-03-07

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4435
    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4450
    Release date: 2010-11-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3309
    Release date: 2010-07-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2010001
    Description:

    Summary of the technical workshop on Estimates of Research and Development in the Higher Education Sector (HERD), held in Ottawa on October 16, 2009. Data users and experts from universities and colleges, granting councils and provincial and federal government departments proposed general and detailed recommendations for the methodology applied in estimating the HERD.

    Release date: 2010-02-26

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