Statistics by subject – Children and youth

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All (6)

All (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1997007
    Description:

    This paper examines the patterns of the intergenerational transmission of education and socio-economic status among immigrants, visible minorities and Aboriginal workers using the 1993 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) data.

    Release date: 1997-12-31

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19970118230
    Description:

    The abuse of children and youth in the family is a serious concern for Canadians. Child abuse and neglect often result in physical, emotional and developmental problems which can affect the victims throughout their lives. There are currently no national estimates of child abuse in Canada. Only those incidents that come to the attention of officials, such as the police and child welfare agencies, are known. Efforts to understand the nature and the scope of child abuse should therefore take into account the fact that available data reflect only a portion of the total. This Juristat uses statistical databases of police reported incidents across Canada to describe what is currently known from a criminal justice perspective about violence against children and youth in the family. Although these police reported incidents account for only a portion of all abuse that occurs, they nonetheless provide an important tool for profiling the more serious cases. For the purposes of this analysis, "children" include all young persons under 18 years of age, and "family members" include persons related to the victim by kniship, either through blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, as well as legal guardians such as foster parents.

    Release date: 1997-11-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19970108167
    Description:

    Providing effective treatment and rehabilitation of young offenders and ensuring the safety of Canadian communities are primary objectives of the youth justice system. Increasingly, this system has felt the pressure of public and media scrutiny. The recent parliamentary review and the media have focused on the most serious criminal events involving youths. The Youth Court Survey, through the collection and dissemination of youth court information, assists policy-makers and program managers as they struggle to redefine the nature of Canada's youth justice system. The Youth Court Survey provides data to monitor the current practice of the courts to deal with youths, aged 12 to 17 at the time of the offence, in the criminal justice system. This Juristat provides information on the nature and volume of cases processed by the youth courts of Canada, on accused characteristics, and on case outcomes during the 1995-96 fiscal year (April to March). National caseload trends are also included.

    Release date: 1997-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19970023227
    Description:

    Many studies have examined the influence of children's upbringing, and home and school experiences on their development. These studies, however, often suffer from several limitations. They either examine children in other countries, use local samples that are not representative of Canadian children in general, or examine a limited number of factors in a single area of development.

    Release date: 1997-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M1997001
    Description:

    This paper examines the distribution of literacy skills for Canadian youth aged 16 to 25, and the underlying factors that influence literacy, such as family background, level of schooling, employment experiences, age and sex.

    Release date: 1997-09-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960043221
    Description:

    This article previews the findings of the 1995 School Leavers Follow-up Survey. The information will interest people in areas such as education or youth employment: policy makers, community advocates, teachers, counsellors, administrators, and young people themselves. Included is basic information about the education, training and labour market experiences of youth during the first few years after leaving or graduating from high school. A comprehensive report on school-work transitions among youth will follow later in 1997.

    Release date: 1997-01-27

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  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19970118230
    Description:

    The abuse of children and youth in the family is a serious concern for Canadians. Child abuse and neglect often result in physical, emotional and developmental problems which can affect the victims throughout their lives. There are currently no national estimates of child abuse in Canada. Only those incidents that come to the attention of officials, such as the police and child welfare agencies, are known. Efforts to understand the nature and the scope of child abuse should therefore take into account the fact that available data reflect only a portion of the total. This Juristat uses statistical databases of police reported incidents across Canada to describe what is currently known from a criminal justice perspective about violence against children and youth in the family. Although these police reported incidents account for only a portion of all abuse that occurs, they nonetheless provide an important tool for profiling the more serious cases. For the purposes of this analysis, "children" include all young persons under 18 years of age, and "family members" include persons related to the victim by kniship, either through blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, as well as legal guardians such as foster parents.

    Release date: 1997-11-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19970108167
    Description:

    Providing effective treatment and rehabilitation of young offenders and ensuring the safety of Canadian communities are primary objectives of the youth justice system. Increasingly, this system has felt the pressure of public and media scrutiny. The recent parliamentary review and the media have focused on the most serious criminal events involving youths. The Youth Court Survey, through the collection and dissemination of youth court information, assists policy-makers and program managers as they struggle to redefine the nature of Canada's youth justice system. The Youth Court Survey provides data to monitor the current practice of the courts to deal with youths, aged 12 to 17 at the time of the offence, in the criminal justice system. This Juristat provides information on the nature and volume of cases processed by the youth courts of Canada, on accused characteristics, and on case outcomes during the 1995-96 fiscal year (April to March). National caseload trends are also included.

    Release date: 1997-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19970023227
    Description:

    Many studies have examined the influence of children's upbringing, and home and school experiences on their development. These studies, however, often suffer from several limitations. They either examine children in other countries, use local samples that are not representative of Canadian children in general, or examine a limited number of factors in a single area of development.

    Release date: 1997-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M1997001
    Description:

    This paper examines the distribution of literacy skills for Canadian youth aged 16 to 25, and the underlying factors that influence literacy, such as family background, level of schooling, employment experiences, age and sex.

    Release date: 1997-09-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960043221
    Description:

    This article previews the findings of the 1995 School Leavers Follow-up Survey. The information will interest people in areas such as education or youth employment: policy makers, community advocates, teachers, counsellors, administrators, and young people themselves. Included is basic information about the education, training and labour market experiences of youth during the first few years after leaving or graduating from high school. A comprehensive report on school-work transitions among youth will follow later in 1997.

    Release date: 1997-01-27

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