Statistics by subject – Children and youth

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All (21)

All (21) (21 of 21 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000035387
    Description:

    This article looks briefly at changes in health in the 20th century, with special focus on the concerns of Canadians in childhood, mid-life and old age.

    Release date: 2000-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000141
    Description:

    Using three waves (1982, 1986, 1990) of the National Graduate Survey (NGS) we analyze the time it takes graduates of Canadian universities to start a full time job that lasts six months or more. We analyze duration to first job using the Cox proportional hazards model. Our results suggest large differences in the speed of the transition to work both within and between cohorts. They also suggest that the differences in duration to first job across NGS cohorts are not just driven by differences in business cycle conditions at the time of graduation. Over certain segments of duration the patterns of job-starting are similar across cohorts. Within cohorts the differences in the school-to-work transition across certain demographic groups are small, and for some the differences remain stable across cohorts.

    Release date: 2000-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000088381
    Description:

    This Juristat presents and analyzes information on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (secure custody, open custody, remand) and probation, and key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status, and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody, and open custody by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented and analyzed at the national and provincial/territorial level.

    Data summarized in this Juristat are primarily drawn from the national Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The scope of the survey is to collect and analyze information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs.

    Release date: 2000-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000025166
    Description:

    This article looks at the household characteristics of children aged 5 to 14 who play sports, with special focus on their parents' involvement in sport.

    Release date: 2000-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000152
    Description:

    There has been for some time substantial concern regarding the loss of young people in rural communities. There is a sense that most rural communities offer few opportunities for their younger people, requiring them to leave for urban communities, most likely not to return. While there is a considerable body of research on interprovincial migration, relatively little is currently known about migration patterns in rural and urban areas in Canada.

    According to our analysis, in virtually all provinces young people 15 to 19 years of age are leaving rural areas in greater proportions than urban areas - in part to pursue post-secondary education. While there are more complex migration patterns affecting the 20-29 age group, the net result of all migration is that the Atlantic provinces - as well as Manitoba and Saskatchewan - are net losers of their rural population aged 15-29. The problem is particularly acute in Newfoundland. In the Atlantic provinces, rural areas which fare worse than the national average - in terms of net gains of youth population - do so not because they have a higher than average percentage of leavers but rather because they are unable to attract a sufficiently high proportion of individuals into their communities.

    Of all individuals who move out of their rural community, at most 25% return to this community ten years later. The implication of this result is clear: one cannot count on return migration as a means of preserving the population size of a given cohort. Rather, rural areas must rely on inflows from other (urban) areas to achieve this goal. Some rural communities achieve this; that is, they register positive net in-migration of persons aged 25-29 or older, even though they incur a net loss of younger people.

    Individuals who move out of rural areas generally experience higher earnings growth than their counterparts who stay. However, it remains an open question in which direction the causality works: is the higher earnings growth the result of the migration process itself or does it reflect the possibility that people with higher earnings growth potential are more likely to become movers?

    Release date: 2000-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990045143
    Description:

    This article explores regional differences among students who drop out of Canadian universities and community colleges.

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990045145
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of young people who responded to the 1991 School Leavers Survey (SLS), but who subsequently failed to respond to the 1995 School Leavers Follow-up Survey (SLF).

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000078380
    Description:

    This Juristat from the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics analyzes recent trends in the sentencing of young offenders, those aged 12 to 17, who have been convicted of a federal offence. The analysis is based on data released earlier in May of this year.

    It provides information on the characteristics of young offenders sentenced in court, the nature of dispositions, trends in sentencing, and comparisons of young offenders on the basis of age, sex, nature of charge, number of charges and prior convictions. In addition, this report compares the sentencing of adult and young offenders.

    Release date: 2000-08-01

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005257
    Description:

    Mistreatment of children and youth is a complex issue that can have devastating consequences and not only the children and youth involved, but on society in general. However, there is no single source for national data on the nature and extent of child mistreatment in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005259
    Description:

    From 1979 to 1998, there were 12,767 victims of homicide in Canada. One-third of the victims were killed by family members, another 36% were committed by acquaintances, and 12% by strangers.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005333
    Description:

    This section highlights innovative court responses to the problem of family violence in the two provinces which currently have specialized courts to deal with family violence cases; Manitoba and Ontario.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005261
    Description:

    Manitoba was the first jurisdiction in Canada to develop a specialized criminal justice system response for family violence cases.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000015087
    Description:

    This article considers the degree to which organized activities in youth may influence community involvement in adulthood.

    Release date: 2000-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000015089
    Description:

    This article examines the time parents spend with their children in families where both mother and father are employed full-time.

    Release date: 2000-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000028375
    Description:

    In 1998/99, 106,665 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 4% decrease from the previous year and a decrease of 7% from 1992/93. It also represents a 13% decrease in the number of cases per 10,000 youths from 1992/93; since that year, the rate has dropped from 500 cases to 435 cases.

    From 1992/93 to 1998/99, the rate of property crime cases decreased annually, dropping 31% over this period. On the other hand, the rate of violent crime cases has increased by 2% since 1992/93.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000014889
    Description:

    Using data from the Labour Force Survey, this article compares school and work activities, as well as the unemployment and part-time employment rates, of students and non-students. (Adapted from the Autumn 1999 issue of Labour Force.)

    Release date: 2000-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024899
    Description:

    This article explores the role of parents in the learning environment of children aged 6 to 11 years, using results from the first cycle of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024897
    Description:

    This article focusses on children who receive special education because of a physical, emotional, behavioural or other problem. It uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024898
    Description:

    This article explores children's academic achievement, behaviour, classroom environment and other school-related experiences, using the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-553-X
    Description:

    The contributors to this book examine two broad themes related to the well-being of Canadian youth. First, they document the nature of the labour market facing young adults and how it has changed since the early 1970s. Second, the authors examine how families, communities, and the public sector influence some of the ways in which children become successful and self-reliant adults. The motivation for bringing these essays together has to do with the increasing importance of child well-being in public discourse and the development of public policy. The major message to emerge is that the future of Canada's children is both a good news, and a bad news story. Labour markets have changed dramatically, and on average it is now more difficult to obtain a strong foothold that will lead to increasing prosperity. Many young Canadians, however, are well prepared by their family and community backgrounds to deal with these new challenges, and as young parents are in a position to pass this heritage on to their children. However, this has not been the case for an increasingly larger minority, a group whose children in turn may face greater than average challenges in getting ahead in life. A companion volume published in February of 1998 by Statistics Canada called Government finances and generational equity examines the operation of government taxes and transfers from a generational perspective, focusing on the conduct of fiscal policy and the relative status of individuals in successive generations.

    Release date: 2000-01-18

Data (5)

Data (5) (5 of 5 results)

Analysis (16)

Analysis (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000035387
    Description:

    This article looks briefly at changes in health in the 20th century, with special focus on the concerns of Canadians in childhood, mid-life and old age.

    Release date: 2000-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000141
    Description:

    Using three waves (1982, 1986, 1990) of the National Graduate Survey (NGS) we analyze the time it takes graduates of Canadian universities to start a full time job that lasts six months or more. We analyze duration to first job using the Cox proportional hazards model. Our results suggest large differences in the speed of the transition to work both within and between cohorts. They also suggest that the differences in duration to first job across NGS cohorts are not just driven by differences in business cycle conditions at the time of graduation. Over certain segments of duration the patterns of job-starting are similar across cohorts. Within cohorts the differences in the school-to-work transition across certain demographic groups are small, and for some the differences remain stable across cohorts.

    Release date: 2000-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000088381
    Description:

    This Juristat presents and analyzes information on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (secure custody, open custody, remand) and probation, and key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status, and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody, and open custody by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented and analyzed at the national and provincial/territorial level.

    Data summarized in this Juristat are primarily drawn from the national Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The scope of the survey is to collect and analyze information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs.

    Release date: 2000-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000025166
    Description:

    This article looks at the household characteristics of children aged 5 to 14 who play sports, with special focus on their parents' involvement in sport.

    Release date: 2000-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000152
    Description:

    There has been for some time substantial concern regarding the loss of young people in rural communities. There is a sense that most rural communities offer few opportunities for their younger people, requiring them to leave for urban communities, most likely not to return. While there is a considerable body of research on interprovincial migration, relatively little is currently known about migration patterns in rural and urban areas in Canada.

    According to our analysis, in virtually all provinces young people 15 to 19 years of age are leaving rural areas in greater proportions than urban areas - in part to pursue post-secondary education. While there are more complex migration patterns affecting the 20-29 age group, the net result of all migration is that the Atlantic provinces - as well as Manitoba and Saskatchewan - are net losers of their rural population aged 15-29. The problem is particularly acute in Newfoundland. In the Atlantic provinces, rural areas which fare worse than the national average - in terms of net gains of youth population - do so not because they have a higher than average percentage of leavers but rather because they are unable to attract a sufficiently high proportion of individuals into their communities.

    Of all individuals who move out of their rural community, at most 25% return to this community ten years later. The implication of this result is clear: one cannot count on return migration as a means of preserving the population size of a given cohort. Rather, rural areas must rely on inflows from other (urban) areas to achieve this goal. Some rural communities achieve this; that is, they register positive net in-migration of persons aged 25-29 or older, even though they incur a net loss of younger people.

    Individuals who move out of rural areas generally experience higher earnings growth than their counterparts who stay. However, it remains an open question in which direction the causality works: is the higher earnings growth the result of the migration process itself or does it reflect the possibility that people with higher earnings growth potential are more likely to become movers?

    Release date: 2000-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990045143
    Description:

    This article explores regional differences among students who drop out of Canadian universities and community colleges.

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990045145
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of young people who responded to the 1991 School Leavers Survey (SLS), but who subsequently failed to respond to the 1995 School Leavers Follow-up Survey (SLF).

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000078380
    Description:

    This Juristat from the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics analyzes recent trends in the sentencing of young offenders, those aged 12 to 17, who have been convicted of a federal offence. The analysis is based on data released earlier in May of this year.

    It provides information on the characteristics of young offenders sentenced in court, the nature of dispositions, trends in sentencing, and comparisons of young offenders on the basis of age, sex, nature of charge, number of charges and prior convictions. In addition, this report compares the sentencing of adult and young offenders.

    Release date: 2000-08-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000015087
    Description:

    This article considers the degree to which organized activities in youth may influence community involvement in adulthood.

    Release date: 2000-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000015089
    Description:

    This article examines the time parents spend with their children in families where both mother and father are employed full-time.

    Release date: 2000-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000028375
    Description:

    In 1998/99, 106,665 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 4% decrease from the previous year and a decrease of 7% from 1992/93. It also represents a 13% decrease in the number of cases per 10,000 youths from 1992/93; since that year, the rate has dropped from 500 cases to 435 cases.

    From 1992/93 to 1998/99, the rate of property crime cases decreased annually, dropping 31% over this period. On the other hand, the rate of violent crime cases has increased by 2% since 1992/93.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000014889
    Description:

    Using data from the Labour Force Survey, this article compares school and work activities, as well as the unemployment and part-time employment rates, of students and non-students. (Adapted from the Autumn 1999 issue of Labour Force.)

    Release date: 2000-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024899
    Description:

    This article explores the role of parents in the learning environment of children aged 6 to 11 years, using results from the first cycle of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024897
    Description:

    This article focusses on children who receive special education because of a physical, emotional, behavioural or other problem. It uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024898
    Description:

    This article explores children's academic achievement, behaviour, classroom environment and other school-related experiences, using the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-553-X
    Description:

    The contributors to this book examine two broad themes related to the well-being of Canadian youth. First, they document the nature of the labour market facing young adults and how it has changed since the early 1970s. Second, the authors examine how families, communities, and the public sector influence some of the ways in which children become successful and self-reliant adults. The motivation for bringing these essays together has to do with the increasing importance of child well-being in public discourse and the development of public policy. The major message to emerge is that the future of Canada's children is both a good news, and a bad news story. Labour markets have changed dramatically, and on average it is now more difficult to obtain a strong foothold that will lead to increasing prosperity. Many young Canadians, however, are well prepared by their family and community backgrounds to deal with these new challenges, and as young parents are in a position to pass this heritage on to their children. However, this has not been the case for an increasingly larger minority, a group whose children in turn may face greater than average challenges in getting ahead in life. A companion volume published in February of 1998 by Statistics Canada called Government finances and generational equity examines the operation of government taxes and transfers from a generational perspective, focusing on the conduct of fiscal policy and the relative status of individuals in successive generations.

    Release date: 2000-01-18

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